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TO 
FRANK EDGAR FARLEY 

WHO HAS BEEN A FAITHFUL TEACHER, A WISE COUNSELLOR 
AND A TRUE FRIEND 

THE CLASS OF 1917 GRATEFULLY DEDICATES THIS BOOK 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/microcosm1917simm 



Ox JVIicrocosm 




Cbe Simmone College Hnnual 

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 
OF SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON : : MASSACHUSETTS 



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VOLUME EIGHT 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 

1917 




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Administrative Board 

Advertising Section 
Index to Advertisers 

Afterword 

Alumnae . 

Athletics 
Basketball 
Hockey 
Tennis 
Track . 

Christmas Vesper Service 

Class Baby .... 

Classes 
1917 . 



19 1 8 .... 

1919 .... 

1920 .... 

College Graduates 
Unclassified Students 
Commencement, 191 6 
Convocation Day . 



Page 

34 

237 
238 
236 

36 

155 
159 
16S 
169 
165 

195 
123 

39 

96 

102 

109 

117 

120 

173 
193 



Corporation .... 

Faculty 

Foreword .... 

Former Members of 19 17 

Just Good Times 

Microchaos . 

Miracle Play . 

Organizations 

Student Government 
Dormitory Government 
Dramatic Association 
Microcosm 
Persimmons 
Y.W.C.A. . . . 
State Clubs 

Social and Civics Club 
Endowment Fund . 
Menorah Society . 
Silver Bay Club 
Musical Association 
Athletics 



Page 

8 

9 
6 

92 
181 
199 

i95 
125 
127 
129 

I3 1 

i33 
135 
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141 

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HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 20, A.B., Boston, Treasurer 

JOHN WASHBURN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Milton, Clerk 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D., Boston 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Boston 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, Newton 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Newbury 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B., Brookline 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D., Cambridge 

HENRY BUCKLAND SAWYER, Boston 



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HENRY LEFAVOUR, President. A.B., 
Williams College, 1883; Ph.D., Williams 
College, 1886; LL.D., Williams College, 
1902; Tufts College, 1905; Additional 
course, University of Berlin. 

Formerly : Instructor in Williston Seminary ; Pro- 
fessor and Dean, Williams College ; President of Sim- 
mons College from 1902. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa ; Trustee, Williams Col- 
lege ; Trustee, Boston State Hospital ; Fellow, American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences ; Fellow, American 
Association for the Advancement of Science ; Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts ; American Political Science 
Association ; New England Historic Genealogical So- 
ciety ; American Economic Association ; American So- 
ciological Association ; Chairman of Trustees, Women's 
Educational and Industrial Union ; Member, Executive 
Committee, North Bennet Street Industrial School ; 
St. Botolph Club; Boston City Club; City Club of 
New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean, Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of Edu- 
cation. A.M., Tufts College. 

Formerly : Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vt. ; 
Director of Training School for Teachers, Saratoga, 
New York ; for seven years Supervisor of Primary 
Schools, Minneapolis, Minn. ; for seven years Super- 
visor of Schools, Boston, Mass. ; for five years member 
of the Massachusetts State Board of Education ; Dean 
of Simmons College since its opening in 1902. 

Publications: Waymarks for Teachers; Reading, 
How to Teach it; Stepping Stones to Literature Series 
(with C. D. Gilbert) ; The Mother Tongue, Lessons in 
Composition (with George Lyman Kittredge) ; Manual 
of Composition and Rhetoric (with George Lyman Kit- 
tredge and John Hayes Gardiner) ; With Pencil and 
Pen; See and Say Series. 

Societies : The Mayflower Club ; Executive Com- 
mittee, Women's City Club; Executive Committee of 
Women's Education Association; Member of Board of 
Trustees, Women's Educational and Industrial Union ; 
American Home Economics Association ; American 
Sociological Association. 



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ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Associate Pro- 
fessor in Household Economics, and 
Chairman of the Department. S.B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1903; Ph.D., Yale University, 1910. 

Formerly : Private Assistant to Dr. S. P. Mulliken, 
1903-1904; Instructor in Simmons College, 1904-1908; 
Assistant Professor in Chemistry in Simmons College, 
1910-1914. 

Publications: Sonic Peculiarities of the Proteolytic 
Activity of Pappain (with L. B. Mendel) ; The Ercpsin 
of the Cabbage. 

Societies : Sigma Xi, American Chemical Society, 
Associate of Collegiate Alumnae. Association of the 
Women of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
American Home Economics Association. 




SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Assistant Professor of Household 
Economics. A.M., Brown University. 

Formerly: Providence and Boston Public Schools; School of Housekeeping, Boston; 
Simmons College, 1902- 

Publications : Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning (joint author with Mrs. Ellen H. 
Richards) ; Household Bacteriology; Household Hygiene; Articles in magazines and papers. 

Societies : Health Education League, Teachers' School of Science, Women of Tech- 
nology Association, New England Home Economics Association, American Home Eco- 
nomics Association. 



ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Assistant Professor of Domestic Art. 
Graduate of Framingham Normal School; Harvard Summer School, 
1898 and 1913-1914; Simmons College, 1905-1906; Columbia Sum- 
mer School, 1909 and 191 1. 

Formerly: Instructor, Perkins Institution for the Blind; Private Teaching, Boston 
Trade School for Girls, Andover Guild Evening Classes ; Andover Guild Summer School, 
1908 and 1910. 

Societies : American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics 
Association, Eastern Manual Training and Art Teachers' Association, Society for the Pro- 
motion of Industrial Education, Alumnae Council of Framingham Normal School, National 
Education Association. 



11 



ULA M. DOW, Assistant Professor of Household Economics. B.S., Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, 1905; M.S., Columbia University, 
1913; Additional courses at the Framingham Normal School, 1905- 
1906. 

Formerly : Instructor at Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906-1914 ; Head of the 
Department of Domestic Science at Kansas State Agricultural College, 1914; Extension 
work at Kansas Agricultural College and at Cornell University. 

Society: American Home Economics Association. 

ALICE N. DIKE, Instructor in Household Economics. B.L., Smith 
College; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; School of House- 
keeping. 

Formerly : Teacher, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Teacher, School of House- 
keeping, Boston ; Experiments and Recipes in Cookery I, Simmons College, 1912. 

AMY M. SACKER, Special Instructor in Interior Decoration. 

Principal of the Amy H. Sacker School of Design for Women. 
Societies : Society of Arts and Crafts, Copley Society. 

BEULAH CEARK HATCH, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College. 

Formerly : Instructor in Domestic Science, Pennsylvania State College. 
Societies : American Home Economics Association ; New England Home Economics 
Association ; Simmons Club of Boston. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, Lecturer on Architecture. A.B., Har- 
vard University. 

ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAR, Instructor in Millinery. Special Courses, 
Columbia University, N. Y., Summer Session, 191 1 ; Special Courses, 
Harvard University, Summer Session, 1913; Special Courses, Sim- 
mons College, 1915-1916. 

Formerly: Instructor in Millinery at the Garland School of Homemaking, Boston. 
Society : New England Home Economics Association. 

MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Instructor in Household Economics. 
S.B., Simmons College; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1916. 

Formerly: Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111.; Assistant in Household Economics. Simmons 
College; Teacher of Domestic Science, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Lectures, Pri- 
vate Classes. 

Societies: American Home Economics Association. Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 
New England Home Economics Association, Simmons Club of Boston. 



12 




BLANCHE LEONARD MORSE, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 
A.B., Smith College, 1892. 

Interior Decorator. Assistant at the Amy H. Sacker School of Decorative Design. 

JANET RITCHIE, Special Assistant in Decoration and Design. 

Amy H. Sacker School of Decorative Design." 

ELIZABETH MAY GOODRICH, Special Instructor in Institutional 
Management, and House Superintendent of the Simmons College 
Dormitories. 

Formerly : Assistant House Superintendent. 

AMY MARGARET FACKT, Instructor in Household Economics. Ill- 
inois Woman's College, 1903; S.B., Simmons College, 191 2. 

Formerly : Assistant in Household Economics, Simmons College, 1912-1913. 

Societies : American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics 
Association, Simmons Club of Boston, Women's Educational and Industrial Union, Ameri- 
can Red Cross Society. 

EMMA REID SOUTHWORTH, Instructor in Household Economics. 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1902. 

Formerly: Offord School, Maiden, Mass.; Derby Academy, Hingham, Mass.; Tech- 
nical High. Springfield. Mass.; Columbia University, Summer School, 1914-1915-1916. 

ETHEL ST1LZ, Instructor in Sewing. Summer School, Butler College, 
Indianapolis; Domestic Arts Course, Pratt Institute, 19 14. 

Formerly : Assistant and Substitute Teacher in the Manual Training High School, In- 
dianapolis. Ind. ; Teacher in Marion County, Indiana, for two years ; Vocational Sewing, 
Indianapolis. 

KATHARINE LORENZ POWEL, Instructor in Domestic Art. Ph.B., 

University of Chicago, 191 2. 

Formerly : Assistant Instructor, Household Arts, University of Chicago, Summer 1912 ; 
Instructor, Household Arts, University of Wyoming, 1912-1914; Instructor, University of 
Chicago, Summer 1914. 

ELLEN C. WOOD, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 191 2; Additional courses at College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Columbia University, 1914; Harvard Summer 
School, 1 9 14. 

Taught at Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 



13 



ALICE EVANNAH PHILBRICK, Special Instructor in Institutional 
Management and Assistant House Superintendent of the Simmons 
College Dormitories. Course in Institutional Management, Sim- 
mons College, 1 9 14. 

Formerly : Assistant to the House Superintendent and Assistant Matron ; Dietitian 
at George School, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1915-1916. 

GERTRUDE WARREN, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Columbia University; Geneseo State Normal School; Cornell Uni- 
versity Summer School. 

Formerly : Teacher in Public Schools of New York, New Jersey, and Iowa ; Assistant 
at Teachers' College, Columbia University. 

Societies : American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics 
Association, Teachers' College Alumnae Association, Women's Educational and Industrial 
Union. 

MABEL WILKERSON, Assistant in Sewing. Ph.B., University of Ari- 
zona, 1909; University of California Summer School, 1 9 13. 

MARCIA CURRIER OSGOOD, Assistant in Household Management. 
A.B., Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College, 1 9 1 5. 

HELEN ELIZABETH MARTIN, Assistant in Sewing. S.B., Simmons 
College, 191 6. 

JULIA EMERY TURNER, Lecturer on Institutional Management; 
Director of the New England Kitchen, Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union. A.B., Vassar, 1895; Graduate work at Yale, 
1906; A.M., Columbia, 1908. 

Formerly: Teacher in High Schools in Illinois; Normal School, Oshkosh, Wis.; Packer 
Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; in charge of a dormitory, Wellesley and Smith 
Colleges. 



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EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Profes- 
sor of Secretarial Studies, and Director 
of the School of Secretarial Studies. A.M., 
Temple University, 1903 ; Ph.D., Temple 
University, 1907; Special work in Psy- 
chology at L T niversity of Chicago, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Clark University. 
Two years at Amherst College. 

Formerly : Stenographer in a business house ; Sec- 
retary to President Conwell. Temple University ; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology. Temple University ; Director of 
School of Business, Temple University. 

Publications: Hypnotism. Penn Publishing Com- 
pany, 1910; Shorthand Dictation Exercises, American 
Book Company. 1909; Expert Typewriting, co-author 
with Miss Rose L. Fritz, American Book Company, 
1912 ; Business Speller, American Book Company, 1913. 

Societies: Delta Upsilon; Vice-President, Alumni 
Association of Temple University; Ex-President of the 
Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association ; Treasurer 
of National Shorthand Reporters' Association. 




CHARLES FOREST RITTENHOUSE, 

Assist ant Professor of Accountancy. Gradu- 
ate of the Department of Business, Scio 
College, 1902; Zanerian Art College, 
Ohio; B.C.S., Boston School of Com- 
merce and Finance, 19 14. 

Registered as a Certified Public Accountant under 
the laws of Massachusetts. 

Formerly : Head of the Commercial Department of 
Northampton Commercial School, Northampton, Mass., 
1903-1910; Instructor in Penmanship in Miss Capen's 
School for Girls, Northampton, for five years ; Instruc- 
tor in the High School of Commerce, Boston, for two 
years. 

Publications: Elements of Accounts, A. D. Mac- 
lachlan. 1915. Various articles on Accounting and 
Commercial Education. 

Societies : American Economic Association, Ameri- 
can Institute of Accountants. Massachusetts Society of 
Certified Public Accountants, Inc., Eastern Commercial 
Teachers' Association , Ex-President New England 
High School Commercial Teachers' Association , Bos- 
ton City Club. 




15 



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GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Secretarial 
Studies. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Formerly : Secretary, President National Biscuit Company ; Secretary, Advertising 
Manager Review of Reviews; Secretary, Commercial Department of the American Book 
Company. 

Societies : Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association, New England High School 
Commercial Teachers' Association. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B., 
Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly: Assistant to the Registrar, Wellesley College; Secretary to the President's 
Secretary, Wellesley College. 

BERTHA METCALF EMERSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons College, 1910. 

Formerly : Assistant to the Editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society ; Secretarial 
Assistant in the President's Office at Harvard University. 

HELEN GOLLER, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Wellesley 
College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly: Secretarial position in Philadelphia. 

CHARLES FREEMAN ROWLEY, Lecturer on Commercial Law. A.B., 
Harvard University, 1905; LL.B., Harvard University, 1907. 

General Practice. Representative in the Legislature from Brookline. 
Formerly : Assistant in Economics, Harvard University. 

JENNIE BLAKENEY WILKINSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons College, 191 1. 

FLORA McKENZIE JACOBS, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. Sim- 
mons College, 191 1. 

Formerly: Private Secretary, 1911-1914. 

HELEN CELIA HEATH, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Vas- 
sar, 1902. 

Formerly : Instructor in Mathematics, St. Mary's School, Concord, New Hampshire. 
Society : Phi Beta Kappa. 

MILDRED ELLA FOYE, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke, 191 1. 

Formerly : Instructor, Woodstock High School, Woodstock, Conn. 



16 



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JUNE RICHARDSON DONNELLY, As- 
sociate Professor of Library Science', and 
Director of Library School. B.S., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1895 ; B.L.S., 
New York State Library School, 1907. 

Formerly : Cataloguer and Reference Assistant, 
Cincinnati Public Library ; Instructor Library Science, 
Simmons ; Director of the Drexel Institute Library 
School and Librarian of the Drexel Institute ; Teacher 
of Library Economy, Washington Irving High School, 
New York City. 



*CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, Lec- 
turer on the History of Libraries. A.B., 
Harvard University. 

Librarian. Boston Athenaeum; Chairman of Sub- 
committee in Art Museum Educational Work. 

Publications: The Librarian's Canons of Ethics; 
Saskin, the Wife of Rc;:ibraudt; The Private Soldier 
under Washington; Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster 
and America. Two Chapters in A. L. A. Manual of 
Library Science; Editor, Letters of Hugh Earl Percy 
and of the Athenaeum Centenary. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa (honorary) at Har- 
vard ; President, Society for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities ; Chairman, Visiting Committee to 
Library Museum of Fine Arts ; Chairman, Sub-com- 
mittee in Educational Work at Art Museum ; Member, 
Visiting Committee to Library, Harvard University ; 
Vice-President. Trustees of Donations for Education 
in Liberia : Member. Massachusetts Historical Society ; 
Senior Warden, Christ Church, Boston ("The Old 
North") ; Trustee, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 





ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem Normal 
School. 

Medford Public Library. 

Formerly : Librarian, Wilmington. N. C. ; Middlesex Mechanics Association, Lowell. 

Societies : American Red Cross Society ; Appalachian Mountain Club ; Massachusetts 
Peace Society ; Massachusetts Library Club ; American Library Association ; National Geo- 
graphic Society. 

ALICE MABEL JORDAN, Special Instructor in Library Science. 
Chief of Children's Department, Boston Public Library. 
*On leave of absence. 



17 



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WterrrSfnrrrrrrrWrr] *k."T 
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CHARLES FRANCIS DORR BELDEN, Lecturer on Public Documents. 
LL.B., Harvard University, 1898. 

Librarian, State Library of Massachusetts ; Chairman, Free Library Commission of 
Massachusetts. 

Societies: Member of the Council of the American Library Association; Vice-Presi- 
dent, National Association of State Libraries. 

FLORENCE TOLMAN BLUNT, Instructor in Library Science. B.L.S., 
Mount Holyoke College, 1896; A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 
1899; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1903. 

Formerly: Reference Librarian and Classifier, Haverhill Public Library, 1903-1915; 
Instructor in Simmons College Summer School, 1910-1915. 

Societies : Sigma Theta Chi ; Member, American Library Association ; Massachusetts 
Library Club. 

MARY ELIZABETH HYDE, Assistant Professor of Library Science. 
A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1901; Student, New York 
State Library School, 1902- 1903. 

Formerly: Editorial Assistant, California Academy of Sciences; Assistant Librarian 
and Assistant Secretary, California Academy of Sciences ; Head Cataloguer, San Fran- 
cisco Public Library. 

ALICE LUCILE HOPKINS, Assistant Librarian. A.B., Smith College, 
1905; S.B., Simmons College, 19 13; Graduate Boston Normal 
School. 

Formerly: Assistant Librarian, Radcliffe College Library, 1908-1911; Assistant Li- 
brarian, Smith College Library, 1911-1912; Assistant Librarian, Simmons College Library, 
1912- 

Societies : Massachusetts Library Club, Smith Alumnae Association, American Library 
Association. 



ANITA MAE ALLEN, Assistant in Library Science. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1915. 

ELLA MARGUERITE COATS, Assistant in the Library. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1916. 



JENNIE CLIFTON FROST, Assistant in Library Science. A.B., Tufts 
College, 1 90 1. Salem Normal School, 1903-1904. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1916. 

Societies: Sigma Kappa, Tufts Alumnae Association, Simmons Alumnae Association. 



MARY MARSHALL RAYMOND, Library Assistant and Secretary of 
the Library Department. A.B., Acadia University, Nova Scotia, 
1914; A.M., 1 9 1 5 ; Simmons, 1915-1916. 

Formerly : Secretary to President of Acadia University. 

CHARLES MARTEL, Lecturer on Library Science; Library of Congress 
— Chief of Catalogue Division. Gymnasium, Zurich, 1876. Univer- 
sity of Zurich, 1879. 

Formerly: Reference Librarian. Department of Arts and Letters; Curator Biblio- 
graphical Museum, Newburv Library, 1893-1897; Library of Congress — Chief Classifier, 
1897-1913. 

Publications: Contributions to professional journals. 

Societies: American Library Association, Bibliographical Society of America (Member 
of Council 1916-), District of Columbia Library Association, American Historical Asso- 
ciation. 




19 



Arafomtr Gkmrars 



Sppartmettt of lEnglisIj 




FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Professor of 
English. A.B., Harvard University, 
1893; A.M., Harvard University, 1894; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1897. 

Formerly : Assistant in English, Harvard Univer- 
sity ; Assistant in English, Radcliffe College; Instructor 
in English, Haverford College ; Professor of English, 
Syracuse University. 

Publications : Author of Scandinavian Influences 
in the English Romantic Movement, 1903; Joint author 
with George Lyman Kittredge of an Advanced English 
Grammar, 1913 ; Editor of Milton's Paradise Lost, 
Books I and II. 



MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, Assistant Professor in English. A.B., 
Vassar; A.M., Wesleyan. 

Formerly : Instructor in English, Virginia College, Va. ; Wesleyan Academy, Wilbra- 
ham, Mass. 

BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, Assistant Professor in English. 
A.B., University of Illinois; A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Formerly: Instructor in English, University of Illinois, 1904-1906; Reader in English 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-1908. 

Societies : Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

CHARLOTTE FARRINGTON BABCOCK, Instructor in English. 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Formerly : Teacher at Miss Carroll's School, Boston ; Teacher at Misses Smith's School, 
Cambridge; Private Tutoring; Assistant in English at Simmons College, 1911-1912. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa, Radcliffe Alumnae Association, Radcliffe Union, Modern 



IDA ALICE SLEEPER, Instructor in English. 
1904. 



A.M., Radcliffe College, 



20 







LUCIA RUSSELL BRIGGS, Instructor in English. A.B., R-adcliffe, 
1909; A.M., Radcliffe, 19 12. 

Formerly: Teacher at Miss McClintock's School. Boston, 1909-1911; Theme Reader at 
Simmons, 1909-1910; Assistant in English at Simmons, 1910-1911; Teacher at the Charlton 
School, New York, 1912-1914; Teacher at the Oak Park High School, Oak Park, Illinois. 

CLINTON HENRY COLLESTER, Instructor in English. A.B., Am- 
herst, 1902; A.M., Harvard, 1904. 

Formerly : Instructor in English. Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Sunday Do- 
cent. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

Publications : A r otes on the "New England Short 0," and Narcissus Plays Distinguished, 
in Modern Language Notes. 

Societies: New England Oral English Conference. Appalachian Mountain Club, Bos- 
ton City Club, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Kappa. 




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21 



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[(Smnatt mxh Snmanrp Uattgnagp s ) 

REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages and Chair- 
man of the Department of Modern Lan- 
guages. A.B., A.M., Bowdoin College. 
Additional courses : Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, The Sorbonne, L' Alliance Fran- 
chise. 

Formerly : Instructor, Bowdoin College ; Instruc- 
tor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Publications : Editor of L'Infant Espion and Other 
Stories. 

Societies : Delta Kappa Epsilon ; Phi Kappa Phi ; 
Modern Language Association ; Salon Frangais de Bos- 
ton ; Engineers' Club. 



ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSSMANN, Assistant Professor of 
German. Berlin Normal College; A.B., Harvard University, 1902. 

Instructor : Harvard University. 

Formerly : Instructor, Simmons College. 

Societies : Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft, Deutscher Sprachverein. 

CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages. A.B., Harvard, 1900; A.M., Harvard, 1901. 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1905; University of Paris; University of Grenoble. 

Formerly: Instructor, Harvard University; Dartmouth College; University of Cincin- 
nati ; Simmons College ; Assistant Professor, Simmons College from 1908. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superfeur), 

Instructor in French. A.M., Radcliffe College; College of Mont- 
beliard, France. 

Formerly: Instructor, Wellesley College. 



HANS WALDO RABE, Instructor in German. A.B., c.l., Harvard 
University; Graduate work at Harvard, 191 1, 191^-1916. 

Formerly: Instructor. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1907-1908. 

Societies: Harvard Deutsche Verein. Modern Language Association. Sprachverein. Har- 



vard Club. 






MARION EDNA BOWLER, Instructor in Romance Languages. A.B., 
University of Idaho, 1909; A.M., Radeliffe College, 1912; Univer- 
sity of Paris; Guilde Internationale; University Grenoble, France. 

Formerly: Instructor in French, Simmons College, 1905-1908; Head French Teacher, 
Kent Place, Summit. N. J., 1910-1911; Instructor in French, Wellesley College, 1911-1912. 
Societies : Gamma Phi Beta. 

WINSTON BRYANT STEPHENS, Instructor in German. A.B., Bow- 
doin College, 1910; A.M., Harvard University, 1914. 

Formerly : Master at Holderness School for Boys ; Principal, High School, Jonesport, 
Maine ; Exchange Teacher, Kolberg, Germany ; Assistant Professor of German, Colgate Uni- 
versity. 

Societies : Alpha Delta Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. 



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Bepattmmt af ijtatory 




HARRY MAXWELL VARRELL, Assist- 
ant Professor in History. A.B., Bow- 
doin College, 1897, A.M., 1900; A.M., 
Harvard University, 1909; Ph.D., 191 2. 

Formerly : Instructor in University of New Mexico, 
1897-1898; Instructor in University of Colorado. 1899- 
1901 ; Brooklyn Latin School, 1901-1902 ; Pueblo High 
School, 1904-1908: Austin Teaching Fellow, Harvard 
University, 1909-1912. 

Societies : Delta Kappa Epsilon ; Phi Beta Kappa : 
American Historical Association; National Geographic 
Society. 



RALPH VOLNEY HARLOW, Instructor in History. A.B., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1909; A.M., Yale University, 191 1 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 

I9I3- 

Formerly ; Mr. Leal's School, Plainfield, N. J., 1909-1910. 
Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical Association. 

HAYES BAKER-CROTHERS, Instructor in History. A.B., Monmouth 
College, 1904. 

Formerly: Principal of High School, Ashland, Wis.. 1905-1913; Assistant in History, 
University of Wisconsin, 1912-1913; Bulkley Fellow, Yale University, 1913-1914. 



CWytX IrOw. (WO^ 



fur 




24 



(c^ 1P^ cs) ^ 




Steparttttenl of iErmtomira 

SARA HENRY STITES, Assistant Profes- 
soi of Economics. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1899; A.M., 1900; Ph.D., 
1904; Student in Economics, Geography 
and Ethnography at the Sorbonne and at 
the College de France, 1900-1901; Uni- 
versity of Leipzig, 1901-1902. 

Formerly: Co-principal of the Wilkes-Barre Insti- 
tute, 1901-1912. 

Publications: Economics of the Iroquois, 1904. One 
of the authors of "Five Hundred Practical Questions 
in Economics," 1916. 

Societies : Member of the Committee on the Teach- 
ing of Economics, appointed by the New England His- 
tory Teachers' Association. 

JOHN EMMETT KIRSHMAN, Instructor in Economics. Ph.B., Cen- 
tral Wesleyan College, 1904; Ph.M., Syracuse University, 1908. 

Formerly: Assistant and Graduate Student at the University of Wisconsin, 1908-1909; 
Assistant Professor, North Dakota Agricultural College, 1909-1914 ; Teaching Fellow, Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1914-1915; Austin Scholar, Harvard University, 1915-1916; Training 
School, New York Bureau of Municipal Research, Summer 1913. 

ALBERT J. KENNEDY, Instructor in Economics. A.B., University of 
Rochester, 1901. S.T.B., Rochester Theological Seminary, 1904. 
Harvard University, 1905-1908. 
Formerly: Assistant Secretary, National Federation of Settlements, 1911; Instructor, 
School for Social Workers, 1914. 

Publications: Jointly with Robert K. Woods, "Handbook of Settlements"; "Young 
Working Girls;' 1913. 




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25 



Ir^ L <^> <g fof> 





ilruartmrut of ^lutnlinuj 

JEFFREY R. BRACKETT, Professor of 
Sat iiil Economy and Director oj the 
School for Social II inkers. A.B., Har- 
vard University, 1883; Ph.D., Julius 
Hopkins University, [899. 

Formerly: President, Department of Charities of 
Baltimore, Mil.. 1900-1903; President, National Con- 
ference of Charities and Correction, 1904; Director of 
School for Social Workers, Boston, from 1904. 

Publications: Supervision and Education in Charity, 
1901 : Occasional articles in "Proceedings of National 
Conferences of Charities." 

Societies: Massachusetts State Board of Charity, 
Director. Massachusetts Civic League, Boston Associ- 
ated Charities, Union Club, City Club, Twentieth Cen- 
tury Club. 

ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Assistant Professor of Social Economy. 

General Secretary, Associated Charities of Boston, for about twenty-five years. 

Publications: Occasional articles in National Conference of Charities, The Survey, etc. 

Societies: Monday Evening Club ; Board of Tucherman School: one of the Trustees 
of Esther Hawks Trust (educational); now and then Examiner for Civil Service positions 
related to Social Work, 

PRESIDENT LEFAVOUR, Instructor in Sociology. 

1 UCI1 E EAVES, Lecturer on Sociology. AB., Stanford University, 
i St>4 ; Graduate Student and lecturer in Extension Department, 
Chicago University, [898-1899; M.S., University of California, 
1 1). 19 : Ph. D., Columbia University, 1 9 1 o. 

Formerly: Head of Historj Department, San Diego High School, San Diego, Cali- 
fornia, 1894-1898; Instructor in History, Stanford University, 1899-1901'; Head Worker, 
San Francisco Settlement Association, 1901-1905; Director of Industrial Bureau, San 
Francisco Relief. 1906-1907; Fellow in Economics; Member of the Summer Session Faculty 
and Lecturer in Economics at the University of California: Associate Professor of Practical 
Sociology, University of Nebraska. 

Publications: ./ History of California Labor Legislation, with Introductory Sketch 
of the San Francisco Laboi Movement, Vol. II of University of California Publications in 
Economics; Women and Children Wage-Earners, in Report of California Labor Bureau; 
Numerous newspaper and encyclopedia articles. 

Societies: American Sociological Society; American Economics Association; Ameri- 
can Association for Labor Legislation; National Child Labor Committee ; Phi Beta Kappa: 
Association of Collegiate Alumnse. 

[DA MAUD CANNON, Special Assistant in Social Economy. Graduate 
rraining School for Nurses, City and County 1 lospital, St. Paul, 1 898 : 
Graduate Boston School for Social Workers, 1907. 
Publications: "Social Work in Hospitals." published by Russell Sage Foundation. 



26 



CHRISTIAN CARL CARSTENS, Special Assistant in Social Economy. 
A.B., Grinnell College, [891; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1900; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1903. 

Publications: "Public Pensions to Widows with Children," published by Russell Sage 
Foundation. 

ALICE HIGGINS L( >T1 1 R( )P, Special Assistant in Social Economy. New 
York School oi Philanthropy, 1902. 



Spparinwni nf Piujrl^iLnuj 

HAROLD ERNEST BURTT, Special I us Inn- lor in Psychology. In- 
structor at Harvard College. A.B., Dartmouth College, 191 1; 
A.M., Harvard, 1 9 1 3 ; Ph.D., Harvard, 191 5. 

Formerly: Instructor in Mathematics at Mount Hermon Boys' School, 1911-1912. 

Publications: Factors Which Influence the Arousal of the Primary Visual Memory 
Image; The Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform Lighting on Attention and Reaction 
Times, with Especial Reference to Street Illumination; A Study of the Behavior of the 
White Rat by the Multiple Choice Method; Auditory Illusions of Movement; So-ne Psy- 
chological Aspects of Aviation; Sex Differences in College Students in the Adult Point 
Scale (written jointly with R. M. Yerkes.) 



Hrpartuuntt nf ipijyBtral SJratnituj 

FLORENCE S. DIALL, Assistant Professor of Physical Training. 
Graduate of Sargent Normal School of Physical Education; Woods 
Hole Marine Biological Laboratory; De Pauw University. 

Formerly: Physical Director, Y.W.C.A., Terre Haute, Ind. ; Instructor, Vassar College. 
Societies: American Physical Education Association. Kappa Alpha Theta. 




27 



Sfpartntrnt of iEouratton 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean of the College, and Professor of the 
Theory and Practice of Education. 

ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, Lecturer on the History of Education. 
LL.B., Normal University, 1894; A.M., Columbia University, 1896; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1898. 

Formerly: Instructor in Philosophy, 1897-1901; Instructor in Education, 1902-1906; 
Dean of the Summer Session. 1905-1907, University of California ; Superintendent of Schools 
in Los Angeles. 1906-1910; Professor of Education, Yale University, 1910-1914; Investi- 
gated Schools, East Orange, N. J., 1911-1912; Professor of Education, Harvard University, 
1913. 

Publications: Hozv New York City Administers Its Schools. 

CASSIE LUCRETIA PAINE, Instructor in Salesmanship. S.B., 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 191 2. 

Lecturer in Pedagogy, Applied Psychology, and Textiles. 

Formerly : Teacher in Public Schools of Massachusetts and New York ; Model Teacher 
in Practice School, Salem, Mass. ; Supervisor of Practice Teaching, State Normal School, 
Salem, Mass. 

Publications : An article on Arithmetic, Elementary School Teacher, April, 1913 ; an 
article on the Origin and Growth of the Movement to Train Teachers of Salesmanship, 
published in Manual Training and Vocational Education. 

ANTOINETTE ROOF, Instructor in Education and Director of the 
School of Industrial Teaching. Director of Practice, Women's Edu- 
cational and Industrial Union. Graduate of Framingham Normal 
School. 

Formerly : Teacher in Grammar Schools in Pennsylvania ; Waltham, Mass. ; Newton, 
Mass. ; Instructor in Royal Normal College for the Blind, London ; Principal of Practice 
Department and Supervisor of Practice in State Normal School, Framingham, Mass. 

HELEN E. LOCKWOOD, Instructor in Education. Graduate Framing- 
ham Normal School. Summer Course Teachers' College. 

Formerly : One year at House of Seven Gables Settlement in Salem. Two years at 
Jacob Tome Institute in Maryland. Two years' teaching in Public Schools of Dedham, Mass. 

LUCINDA WYMAN PRINCE, Lecturer on Salesmanship and Director 
of the School of Salesmanship. 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 

HARRIET A. NIEL, Instructor in Education. Kindergarten Training 
Teacher. 



28 



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Scpartnuutt of UUnloyu 



CURTIS MORRISON HILLIARD, As- 
sistant Professor of Biology and Public 
Health. A.B., Dartmouth College, 
1909; Additional courses at Institute of 
Technology, 1909-19 10. 

Formerly: Instructor, College of the City of New 
York. 1911-1912; Assistant Professor of Biology, Pur- 
due University, 1912-1914. 

Societies : Gamma Alpha, Sigma Xi, American Pub- 
lic Health Association, American Bacteriologists, Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Science, Mas- 
sachusetts Board of Health Association, Fellow in the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Boston Bacteriological Society, Executive Committee 
Massachusetts Anti-tuberculosis League. 




EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, Special Instructor in Municipal Labor- 
atory Methods. S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Bacteriologist, Massachusetts Department of Health. 

JANE BOIT PATTEN, Special Instructor in Botany and Horticulture. 
S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1916; Additional 
courses at Technische Hochschule, Dresden, Germany; Course at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole ; Course at the Botanical 
Garden and Experiment Station, Dresden, Germany. 

CAROLINE MAUDE HOLT, Instructor in Biology. A.B., Wellesley; 
Graduate work at Harvard ; A.M., Columbia. Two years' gradu- 
ate work at University of Pennsylvania. 

Formerly : Instructor in Biology, Wellesley College. 

ELIZABETH FAITH GENUNG, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Cornell 
University, 19 1 1 ; M.S. A., Cornell University, 1914. Cortland 
Norman School, 1905. 

Formerly : Instructor at Cornell University and Iowa State Teachers' College. 

MILDRED ANGIE DAVIS, Special Assistant in Biology. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1 9 1 5. Research work in Biology in 1916. 



29 



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ALVALYN E. WOODWARD, Instructor in Biology. Ph.B., Univer- 
sity of Rochester, 190:;; Cold Springs Harbor Summer School, 1906; 
M.S., University of Rochester; Two years' study at University of 
Michigan; two summers' study at University of Michigan Biological 
Station; Three summers' study at Marine Biological Laboratory at 
Woods Hole. 

Formerly : Instructor for two years at Michigan Central Normal School ; Two years 
at Vassar College. 

Publications: Articles in Michigan Academy of Science, and Biological Bulletin. 
Societies: Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi. 

BESSIE L. JOST, Instructor in Bacteriology. S.B., Simmons College, 
1915. Assistant in Hygiene, Wellesley College, 1915-1916. 

EVANGELINE W. YOUNG, M.D. Special Lecturer in Social Hygiene. 

A. VINCENT OSMUN, M.S. Special Lecturer on Plard Diseases. 




30 



HrpartntMtt of QUirmtatrii 



KENNETH LAMARTINE MARK, Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, and Director of the 
School of General Science. A.B., Har- 
vard, 1898; A.M., Harvard, 1900; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1903. 

Formerly : Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard Uni- 
versity : Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College, 
1904-1906; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, 1906- 
1914; Associate Professor, Simmons College, 1914-1916. 

Publications: "Thermal Expansion of Gases"; 
"Salinity of Sea Water." 

Societies : Delta Upsilon ; American Chemical So- 
ciety. 




ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Associate Professor of Household Econo 



mics. 



GORHAM WALLER HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., 
Harvard, 1907; A.M., Harvard, 1909; Ph.D., Harvard, 1915. 

Formerly: Teacher of Latin, Greek, and Geometry, Medford High School, Medford, 
Mass.. 1907-1908; Assistant and Teaching Fellow in Chemistry at Harvard University, 
1908-1910; Instructor in Chemistrv at Simmons College, 1910-1913; Assistant Professor 
from 1914. 

Publications : "Floating Equilibrium." 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa (Harvard), American Chemical Society, American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, Association of Harvard Chemists, Intercollegiate 
Socialist Society, various reform organizations. 

BESSIE MARION BROWN, Instructor in Organic Chemistry. S.B., 
Simmons College, 1907; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 19 13. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College, 1907-1911. 
Society : American Chemistry Society. 



LESLIE BRIGGS COOMBS, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Harvard 
University, 1909; M.S., Harvard University, 191 1. 

Formerly: Head Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, Harvard University, 1909-1911; 
Research work in the Wolcott Gibbs Laboratory, Harvard University. 

Publications : "A New Method of Measuring the Pressure of Corrosive Gases at Con- 
stant Volume" (with Dr. G. S. Forbes) ; "The Surface Tension of Water, Methyl, Ethyl 
and Isobutyl Alcohol, Ethyl Butyrate, Benzine, and Toluene" (with Prof. T. W. Richards). 

Societies : Alpha Phi Sigma, American Chemical Society. 



31 



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l © ^y^ c^ <£=$> ^5 ii^^iT 


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HARRIET ISABELLE COLE, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Middle- 
bury College, 1906; A.M., Radcliffe College, 191 1; Graduate work 
at Yale, 1913-1914. 

Formerly : Instructor in Science, Hopkins Academy, Hartley, Mass., 1906-1908 ; Alding- 
ton High School, Abington, Mass., 1908-1910; Wellesley College, 1910-1913. 

Publications: Use of Telluric Acid in Estimation of Bromine Associated with Chlorine 
in Haloid Salts, in the Zeitschrift fur Anorganische Chcinie, vol. 86, and in the American 
Journal of Science, vol. 217; The Estimation of Iodine and Bromine in Haloid Salts by 
Means of Telluric Acid, in the American Journal of Science, September, 1914. 

EARLE OVANDO WHITTIER, Instructor in Chemistry. B.S., 191 1, 
University of Maine; M.S., 1913, University of Maine. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, University of Maine, 1911-1915. 

Societies : Phi Kappa Phi, Tau Beta Pi, Alpha Chi Sigma, American Chemical Society. 

EVA ADELAIDE JACOBI, Assistant in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons 
College, 191 6. 

FLORENCE CELIA SARGENT, Instructor in Chemistry. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 191 1. 

Formerly : Research Assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 



Skpartutrnt of 3fiim Arts 

FRANCIS MELBOURNE GREENE, Lecturer on the Appreciation and 
History of Art. B.L., University of California, 1892; Ph.D., 
Berlin, 1908. 

The Appreciation of Art, thirty lectures; The History of Art, thirty lectures. 
Formerly: University Extension Lecturer, University of California, 1901. 
Publications: In course of completion: The Work of Art, a System of Aesthetic 
Appreciation ; An Aesthetic Guide to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 




32 



Srpartnuuit of Pjpfaa 



LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Associate 
Professor of Physics. A.M., Ph.D., 
Washington and Lee University; A.M., 
Harvard University. 

Formerly : Assistant in Mathematics, Washington 
and Lee University : Assistant in Physics, Harvard 
University ; Professor in Physics, Westminster. 

Publications: Thomson Effect, Hall Effect, Nernst 
Effect, Ledue Effect, Ettingshausen Effect in Soft Iron, 
Thenno-Electric Heterogeneity in Alloys, etc.; Disin- 
tegration of the Alit-'ininni Cathode, in the Philosophi- 
cal Magazine. September. 1914. 

Societies : Fellow, American Association for Advance- 
ment of Science; American Physical Society; Eastern 
Association of Physics Teachers ; Mathematical and 
Physical Club ; National Geographical Society ; Congo 
Reform Association; Phi Beta Kappa. 



GEORGE PRESTON BACON, Assistant 
Professor of Physics and ISIathematics. 
A.M., Dartmouth College; Graduate 
work at the University of Michigan and 
the University of Berlin. 

Formerly: Instructor in Science, Peekskill Military 
Academy; Assistant Principal. Beloit College Academy; 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Beloit College; 
Professor of Physics. University of Wooster. 

Societies : Theta Delta Chi ; Phi Beta Kappa ; 
American Physical Society ; American Astronomical 
and Astrophysical Society. 




MARGUERILE DOROLHEA TSCHALER, Instructor in Physics. 
A.B., Boston Lhiiversity, 191 1: A.M., Boston University, 1913. 

Formerly : Cambridge Evening Schools. 

Societies : Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Gamma Delta, Massa- 
chusetts Society for the University Education of Women. 

WALLACE F. POWERS, Instructor in Physics. A.B., Clark College, 
1 9 10; Ph.D., Clark University, 19 14. 

Formerly: Laboratory Assistant. Clark College. 1910-1913; Associate Professor of 
Physics and Mathematics. Richmond College, Ya., 1914-1916. 
Society : American Physical Society. 

ELIZABETH MacGREGOR, Assistant in Physics. A.B., Smith Col- 
lege, 1913 ; Graduate work at Smith College, 1915-1916. 
Formerly : Assistant in Physics, Smith College, January 1915-June 1916. 



33 



($ffim*s of AommtBtratton 

HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., President. 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, A.M., Dean. 

EVELYN WALKER, A.B., Registrar. 

LYSSON GORDON, A.B., Bursar. 

MARJORIE BURBANK, A.B., Recorder. 

GERTRUDE JANE BURNETT, S.B., Secretary to the President. 

ALICE IRENE MANDELL, Ph.B., Secretary to the Dean. 

MARGARET MUNRO GRIMSHAW, A.B., S.B., Assistant Registrar. 

GRACE BARBER LEONARD, Cashier. 

MARJORY CORWIN, Secretary to the Director of the School of House- 
hold Economics. 

ALICE CATHERINE McMANAMA, Assistant to the Registrar. 

MABEL ADDISON SPEAR, S.B., Assistant to the Recorder. 

HELEN MARGARET CLARK, A.B., S.B., Secretary to the Director 
of the School of Library Science. 

LEAH CLARK, Assistant to the Registrar. 

MARGARET SIMS, S.B., Assistant to the Bursar. 

ALICE THERESA GRAY, S.B., Secretary to the Director of the School 
of Secretarial Studies. 

SYBIL HUNTINGTON PEASE, A.B., Secretary to the Director of the 
School for Social JJ'orkers. 



34 



ALUMMM 



President, Beulah C. Hatch 

Vice-President, Gertrude Ford 

Secretary, Bertha M. Emerson 

Treasurer, Theodora Kimball 



Prrattonts of tire i>tmmnttB GJnllwje (Ehtha 



Boston 


Dorothy Fay 


Cleveland .... 


Marion Johnson 


Connecticut Valley 


Helen C. Bailey 


Grand Rapids 


Emma Foote (Mrs. C. S. ) Dexter 


Hartford 


Marjorie A. Goddard 


Illinois 


Margaret Ridlon 


Maine 


Louisa I. Pryor 


New York City . 


Dora B. Sherburne 


Rhode Island .... 


Rebecca S. Sackett 


Southern New Hampshire 


Hannah Shepard 


Tacoma-Seattle . . 


Marion Lovis 


Western New York . 


Mary Curtis (Mrs. H. P. Jr.) Kendall 


Worcester County 


. Marion Loring (Mrs. A. W.) Wood 



36 




seniors 



(Elaaa of 131 X 




QDfftrrrH 

Eleanore F. Keith 

President 

Lucy Nash Elisabeth Miller 

Vice-President Secretary 

Marguerite Bond 

Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Helen M. Foster Mary Pollard 

Louise P. Johnson Alma M. Smith 

Class Color: Pink 




39 




Beulah C. Hatch 

"Inexhaustible good-nature is the most precious gift 
of Heaven ; it spreads itself like oil over the troubled sea 
of thought, and keeps the mind smooth and equable in 
the roughest weather." 




Frank E. Farley 

"Self-culture in its broadest sense carries with it many 
blessings ; it tempers the body, elevates the mind, and 
lifts the soul into realms of refined thought, it creates a 
world of happiness of which the ignorant have no con- 
ception." 




Reginald R. Goodell 

"The crown and glory of life is character; it is the 
noblest possession of a man, constituting a rank in itself 
and an estate in the general good-will, dignifying every 
station, and exalting every position in Society." 



40 



Barbara M. Abbott 



"Barb" 



"Babbitts" 



Barbara is a cheerful, business-like little person, equally 
qualified to become a teacher or a secretary, tor she can 
think of most complicated exam questions and is so at- 
tached to her typewriter that she comes over immediately 
after breakfast every day to see that it is still in its 
place. Surely such thoughtfulness will not go unre- 
warded. 

Reading High School. 
North Reading". Mass. 
Secretarial. 
Dormitory Council (4). 



Marion Pearl Ayer 

"She takes things as they come and go, 
And of complaint is chary." 

If you don't think Marion is fleet of finger, as well as 
of foot, look at her typewriting medal. And her ac- 
complishments do not end here, as her marks testify. As 
auditor of Treasurer's accounts she has much trouble in 
getting us straightened out, especially such of us as are 
Household Ecs. Marion is one good all-round girl whom 
we have all liked to be with during our four years. 

Biddeford High School. 

15 Kossuth Street, Biddeford, Me. 

Secretarial. 



Hannah Baldwin 

"Hannie B" 

"Oh. it's nice to get up in the morning, 
But it's nicer to lie in your bed." 

Poor Hannie is aroused from that sweet dream of 
peace each morning by the loud crow of a rooster. Our 
Hannah has very decided likes. Expressed geometri- 
cally thev are summed up as follows: 

Given: No tea, no sauce tartare, no French fries, no 
theatres. 

Problem: To make Hannah happy. 

Schenevus High School. Emma Willard School. 
Schenevus, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 
Mandolin Club (1). 




41 




Ione Baldwin 

"Here's to the girl with the eyes of gray 
Whose sunny smile drives care away." 

lone, wherefore your fondness for strolls to the Ar- 
boretum? Are they prompted bv love of Nature and 
Man? 

Ione's wit is keen and entertaining at all times, but 
its flow is best when she is playing solitaire on the eve 
of a mid-year exam. 

University of California. 

135 Locust Street, Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Household Economics. 



Edith Alice Barton 

"Ede" 

Edith is one of those enviable creatures who possess 
a beautiful disposition. She never grumbles or complains 
when things go wrong, but is as serene and sunshiny as 
if she had not a care in the world. Sometimes we wish 
she would assert herself a little more boldly, but ne'er 
is the peaceful current of Edith's course through Simmons 
ruffled. 

New Milford High School. 
New Milford, Conn. 
Household Economics. 




Marian Bathgate 

Marian is without doubt the most enthusiastic girl in 
the class. This admirable quality coupled with her ex- 
treme politeness will surely carry her successfully through 
life over all obstacles. Her originality and loyal class 
spirit have ever been in evidence, and 1917 has had a valu- 
able member in Marian. Here's to the finest luck in 
rhe world ! 

Dearborn Morgan School, Orange, N. J. 
254 Roseville Avenue. Newark, N. J. 
Household Economics. 

Dramatic Committee (3, 4). Tennis Champion (3), 
Choir (2. 3, 4), Senior Prom Usher (3). 



42 



Ada Bauer 

"Gus" "Polly" 

Ada conies to college once in :i while to see how the 
classes are progressing. Then when she is satisfied that 
her presence is not absolutely essential to the progress of 
college, she vacates, so to speak, and takes a rest. She 
left us for a year to sojourn at the University of Maine, 
but she just had to come back for the happiness of all 
parties concerned, for her gay humor makes her a fa- 
vorite with all. 

Miss Guilds' and Miss Evans' Schools. 
340 First Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 
Library Science. 

Honor Committee (1). Glee Club (1. 2), Cheer Leader 
(2). 




Constance Beal 

"Connie" ' 

"Blest with a taste exact, yet unconfined, 
A knowledge both of books and humankind." 

We have realized your knowledge of books, Con- 
stance, ever since the beginning of Freshman year. Now 
that your skillful management of the lunch room has 
shown itself, we find that you have an equal knowledge 
of humankind, and how to manage them in large quan- 
tities. 

Hyde Park High School. 

1.3 Floral Place, Newlon Highlands, Mass. 

Library. 

Chairman of the Lunchroom Committee (4). 




Esther Beckford 

"Becky" 

Have you ever seen a person who could take tiresome 
everyday trips in hot trains and crowded street cars and 
still have an ever-ready smile for all? 

Have you ever seen a person who could go from day 
to day, from class to class, calmly, quietly, saying little, 
doing much, helping her classmates, loving her classmates? 
No ? Then vou've never seen our Esther. She fills 
the bill. 

Woodward Institute. 

300 Washington Street, Quincy, Mass. 

Library. 

Y.W.C.A. Missionary Committee (4). 




43 




Natalie Betts 

Some people's special work in life seems to be in keep- 
ing happy, and we all admit their value in this sober old 
world. Perhaps this is why we all like to have Natalie 
M&rop in to see us. 

Scranton Central High School. 

1419 Gibson Street, Scranton, Pa. 

Household Economics. 

Endowment Fund Committee (1), Glee Club, Choir 

(1, 4), Honor Committee (2), Secretary-Treasurer 

Pennsylvania Club (3). 



Dorothy May Black 

• "Dot" 

Dorothy is an odd mixture of the old and the new. 
She is an ardent suffragette, yet she is domestic and makes 
the most delicious fudge ever; she can converse intelli- 
gently on all kinds of up-to-date topics, yet she loves to 
read Jane Austen. A mind with such a broad scope, 
having its subject matter so well classified, and probably- 
arranged according to subject headings, will surely lead 
Dorothy into the high places of the library world. 

Stamford High School. 

16 Clark's Hill Avenue, Stamford, Conn. 

Library. 

House Chairman (2), Executive Board (3). 




Mildred Bliss 

To Mildred we say greetings and farewell in one 
breath. She came to us in this our last year, and in her 
we have one more friend. What can express our feelings 
more exactly than the proverb, time-worn but with a 



wealth of meaning 
apropos. 



"Better late than never.' 



Tis 



Classical High School, Providence. R. I. 
35 Boylston Avenue, Providence, R. I. 
Secretarial. 



44 



Marguerite Bond 

"Peg" 

A very pleasant person, whose jollity is often evidenced 
by tiny lurking dimples! Our Peg is a dignified young 
lady who is highly respected, deeply trusted, and gener- 
ally beloved. 

Adams High School. 

9 Crandall Street, Adams, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Choir (1), Accompanist for Glee Club (2), Executive 
Eoard (3), Class Treasurer (4), Chairman Second 
Hand Book Committee (4), Peterborough House 
Chairman (4). 




Marion Clarissa Boorn 

"Mary Anne" 

Marion has shown of late a most passionate liking for 
But pray do not think her a 
"Mary Anne" loves fun and 
lets studv interfere with any 



the poetry of English 7. 
grind ! On the contrary, 
a good time, and seldom 
pleasures. 



Brattleboro High School. 

24 Brook Street, Brattleboro, Vt. 

Household Economics. 




Marion Bowman 

"Her words are simple and her soul sincere." 

A tall slender girl is our Marion, who is a constant 
source of surprises to her friends even after four years. 
She admits that she plays tennis — a little. But just you 
go play with her and let her serve you a "swift one." 
Then you'll have to hurry and be the swift one. She 
admits that she plays the mandolin — a little. But just 
try to find a tune she can't play ever so sweetly to vou ! 

Sharon High School. 

Sharon, Mass. 

Library. 

Basketball (1. 2). Track (2), Mandolin Club (3, 4). 




45 




Helen Rosson Boyce 

It is still a mystery how the "Boys" enrolled at Sim- 
mons for we always thought this was a strictly female 
college. At any rate we are glad the "Boys" did come, 
for they made friends with George at once, and have 
chummed together for four years. 



Northfield Seminary. 
Stoneham, Mass. 
Household Economics. 



lAwiR, 



^ CA - 




Frances Mary Bradley 

"Fran" "Frannie" 

Fran is an authority on all affairs of the heart. In fact, 
at present she is writing a book which she expects to pub- 
lish at Senior Luncheon, entitled, "A Man's Heart, and 
How to Capture it." We recommend it as a book that 
should be included in every girl's education. 

Branford High School. 
75 Church Street. Branford, Conn. 
Household Economics. 
President Connecticut Club (4). 




Beatrice O. Brown 

"B" 

We have great hopes of "B." She is the budding de- 
signer — costume designer — of our class. Her ambition, 
so we are told, is to design the costumes for the Ziegfeld 
Follies. Mav we be there to see the results, Bea, when 



you realize this ambitic 



■ I 



We know it will be worth it. 



Holten High School. 

Old Berry Tavern, Danvers, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Usher Senior Prom (3), Varsity Hockey (4). Social 

and Civics Executive Board (4). Usher Junior 

Prom (2). 



46 



Lela Brown 

"Such joy ambition finds." 

Lela's ambition is to be a Social Worker and she'll 
be a good one if she is as good at that as she was in 
everything she took with us at the college building. The 
good wishes of 1917 go with her in her philanthropic 
work. 

Rochester High School. 

21 Cordis Street. Charlestown, Alass. 

Social Service. 




Marion Burnes 

"Something attempted, something done. 
Has earned a night's repose." 

We should not deem you the most talkative member 
of our class, were we to hold a contest for such an en- 
viable position, Marion, for we know that you are too 
busy plucking fruit from the tree of knowledge to in- 
dulge in words, mere idle words. 

Hyde Park High School. 
Hyde Park. Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Marie Chaplin 

"Hail to thee, blithe spirit." 

May your laughter be as contagious as it has been 
since 1917 has known you, Marie, and may your life be 
as happy as your laughter! 

Pawtucket High School. 

107 Mineral Spring Avenue. Pawtucket. R. I. 

Household Economics. 




47 



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Blanche Elinor Childs 

"Cerrie" 

Here's to the girl who is sweet and petite, 
Here's to the girl who is true; 

Here's to the girl who is always a sport, 
In other words, here's to you! 

Waltham High School. 

68 Dale Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Helen Irene Clancey 

"H-tick" 

If ever you desire a good clever comedian, with a large 
repertoire, adaptable to any scene, although showing a 
slight preference for spiritualistic settings, "Hie" is to 
be highly recommended. 

Her education has been singularly broad for she is an 
excellent performer on the kazoo and shows a rare ap- 
preciation of art, especially of Mic photographs. 

Milford High School. 

145 West Street, Milford, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



Helen M. Clark 

"Hel" 

Our definition of "Hel" is "a sweet, dignified member of 
1917." .How inapplicable nicknames can be! She's some li- 
brarian, too — so if you are looking for someone to cata- 
logue your library, don't forget "Hel." It's very con- 
Vvenient to have her around as we can give vent to our 
feelings without alarming our neighbors. 

Hebron Academy. 
Madison. Maine. 
Library. 



48 



Else A. Claussen 

"Els" 

Our advice to the world in general is, that if you 
want anything done that requires system, get Else to do 
it. She can make a consecutive plan and have it carried 
out to the last detail, and in the meantime you can 
run away and play. She is a very dignified person, and 
yet, responds to the name of "Old Lady." Perhaps it's 
her humorous sense that responds. However, lead on 
more Minnesotans like her. 

Central High School. 
525 Laurel Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 
Household Economics. 

Chairman Junior-Senior picnic (3). House Chairman 
(4), Chairman Class Day Committee (4). 




Ruth B. Corwin 

"Ruins" 
Genius + a sympathetic nature , r Simmons 



"Oh dear" + a giggle 



X 



New York 



= Ruth. 



She wanders lowly here and there 

To help us in our work ; 
Inspiring us with all her might, 

Doing what others shirk. 

She always is our friend in need ; 

She does what we have planned ; 
And touched by all our pleas for aid, 

She lends a helping hand. 

Blair Hall. 

146 Second Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Household Economics. 

Secretary New Jersev Club (3), President New Jersey 

Club (4), Microcosm Board (4), Y.W.C.A. 

Cabinet (4). 

Alma Cottrell 

"Pans" "Pansy" "Almee" 

Those paper cutters are darling, Alma, and the pic- 
tures of the war zone are very interesting and conducive 
to an appreciation of war ambulance/-.?. A dashing actress 
and an efficient and skillful needlewoman is our Alma. 

Gloucester High School. 
9 Foster Street, Gloucester, Mass. 
Household Economics. 
Dormitory Council (4). 



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49 



Ylrv^.r; 




CU~X<« 




Nathalie Cox 

"Nath" "Nat" 

Nathalie's doctrine is, "We are all born for love and 
it is the only principle of existence and its only end." 
She carried out her belief very consistently by announcing 
her engagement last summer. We all send Nat out into 
the world with the heartiest good wishes. 

Wakefield High School. 

8 West Water Street, Wakefield, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Marion Tenny Craig 

"M. T." "Empty" 

M.T.'s initials are the exact antithesis of M.T. her- 
self for her auburn tresses cover a decided amount of gray 
matter, otherwise how could she have filled those re- 
sponsible positions? Seventeen has not had a truer friend, 
a more loyal member, or a harder worker than Marion — 
not to mention her fame as an untiring story-teller. Sim- 
mons will indeed be M.T. without her. 

Portsmouth High School. 

500 Broad Street, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Secretarial 

Dormitory Council (4), Mic Board (3. 4). Dramatic- 
Committee (3), Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (3), Chair- 
man Sophomore Play (2), Athletics Toast Sopho- 
more Luncheon (2), Usher Senior Prom (3), 
Basketball (1, 2). 




Phebe Currier 

"Phebe" 
"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance.' 

Ready for work and ready for play. 
Always happy, good-natured, and gay. 
"Who is this maiden?" I hear you say, 
"Couldn't you guess? — Why, Phoebe." 

Colebrook Academy. 
Colehrook. N. H. 
Household Economics. 



50 



Carolyn Rosamond Davis 

"Carol" 
"Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds." 
She has a happy faculty of being ready to give sus- 
tenance to living beings. When you are hungry Carol 
can always supply something in the line of "eats." We 
wonder if this practice on humans is what enables her 
to get along so well with biological specimens. We look 
to Carol for some startling discovery in the biological 
world for she is happiest when delving into the mysteries 
of Room 218. 

Everett High School. 
160 Garland Street, Everett, Mass. 
General Science. 

Executive Board (2), Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (4), Chairman 
Senior Events (4), Choir. Glee Club (3. 4). 



Ruth Almira Davis 

"But the kind hosts their entertainment grace 
With hearty welcome and an open face ; 

In all they did you might discern with ease 
A willing mind and a desire to please." 

If you have ever seen Ruth's model note book, compact 
and neat, if you have ever gone up to her room, tired, 
discouraged and hungry, and been wonderfully refreshed 
by reassuring words quietly spoken, and a cup of tea, you 
don't wonder that the Brookline Public Library can't 
part with her. 

Xorthfield Seminar}'. 

Royalston, Mass. 

Library. 

Dormitory Council (4). 



Helen M. Decelle 

"Billy" 

Helen is one of our most competent members, 
carries herself with such a dignity that only her 
acquaintances know of her merry giggle,--, an 
love of frivolity which said giggle implies.l \ 



Somerville High School 
46 Marshall Street, Winter Hill, -Mats. 
Secretarial. v\i " 

President Simmons Somerville ClupM^3). 



51 








Mary Frances Dittmer 

"Polly" "Ditty" 
We see in Polly all the dignity and serenity that we 
like to think we ourselves possess but don't. If you ob- 
serve her leading Y.W. or shooting baskets, you will find 
her equally efficient and unflurried. 

B.M.C. Durfee High School. 

36 Frances Street. Brookline, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

House Chairman (2, 3), Class Basketball (2, 3), Track (2, 
3), Tennis Doubles Champion (2), Mandolin Club (2, 
3), Usher Senior Prom (3), Vice-President Y.W.C.A. 
(3), Secretary-Treasurer Musical Association (3), Pres- 
ident Y.W.C.A. (4), Student Government Council (4). 

Ethel Dole 

"Brom" "Doley" 
Such a sweetness ! 
Such a neatness ! 
How she shows in all completeness 
All the knowledge 
Learned in college, 
In four years of Household Ec ! 
Concord High School. 
6 Merrimac St., Concord, N. H. 
Household Economics. 

Junior Prom Usher (2), Vice-President New Hampshire 
Club (3), Senior Prom Usher (3), President New 
Hampshire Club (4), Chairman Bulletin Board Com- 
mittee (4), Dormitory Government Council (4). 

Marion Doten 

"Dotie" 
"The heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, or the 
hand to execute." 
Don't think because we seldom say 
As we see you day by day, 
Planning all you have to do 
And always carrying it through, 
That we do not really know 
Things you have to undergo. 
But Seventeen is proud of you 
And of the many things you do. 

We look to Dotie to make a success. As a ruler we 
know she'll do, whether it be in the Senate or in a 
cottage. 

Somerville High School, Wheaton Seminary. 

Somerville, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Class President (2), President of Student Government (4), 
Vice-President Dormitory Government (3), Vice-Presi- 
dent Dramatic Association (3). Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (3), 
Honor Committee (3), Chairman Welcoming Commit- 
tee (3), Chairman Accommodation Committee Junior 
Prom (3), Junior Prom Usher (2). Senior Prom Usher 
(3), Delegate to Intercollegiate Conference at Cleve- 
land (3), at Mt. Holyoke (.4). 

52 



Marion Agnes Driscoll 

"Alary Anne" "Driskey" 

Youi clothes, Driscoll, are at once our joy and our 
despair. Would that we had some such. Yet you are 
so many things besides a charming fashion barometer! 
In athletics you are a loyal and successful booster. But 
most of all we envy you the come-hithery look in your 
eyes. 

Brookline High School. 
21 Kent Street, Brookline, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Track (1), Manager (2, 3), Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Manager (2), Captain Sub- Varsity Hockey (4), 
Manager (3), S.A.A. Executive (2, 3), S.A.A. 
Vice-President (3), Chairman Refreshment Com- 
mittee Junior Prom (3), Usher Senior Prom (3), 
Publicity Committee of Dramatics (4). 

Nellie Gertrude Dunmore 

Gertrude is the lady's name, 

Well-known ever. 
Great and far-reaching her fame. 

Wherefore ? — Discover ! 

Gertrude is a suffragette ! Rumor has it that she wore 
out five pairs of shoes last year in the suffrage campaign. 
She delights in holding "Votes for Women" banners on 
the street corners. A great career is prophesied for her, and 
whether it be making stump speeches for the presidential 
candidate, or teaching the young idea how to cook, we 
know that she will enjoy herself. She always does. 

267 Alabama Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

Household Economics. 

Endowment Fund Committee (2), Glee Club (2, 3). 





Marjorie Eastman 

"Marj" "Ole" 

M is for Marjorie so quiet and true; 

A for admiration we all know is due ; 

R her reserve which hides gifts manifold ; 

J for opinions most cautiously told ; 

is for optimism always at hand ; 

R for reports which meet any demand ; 

1 for her interest in all college affairs; 
E the esteem which everyone shares. 

Union Academy. 

Belleville. N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Vice-President New York Club (3), President New 
York Club (4), Chairman Endowment Fund Com- 
mittee (4). 

53 





Nettie V. Eastman 

As Schiller said, 

"Spat kommt ihr — doch ihr kommt!" 
As Simmons would have it — 

"Better late than never, but better never late. 1 

Gushing Academy. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Household Economics. 




Gertrude J. Ellis 

"G" "Gellis" 

We don't know whether G. will be a florist and have 
enormous greenhouses in the country and beautiful florist 
windows in the city, or whether she will run a farm, in 
the years after college, but she is quite sure to do one or 
the other if she follows her evident natural tendencies. 
We know, however, that she will succeed in her work, 
no matter what she chooses. She has proved it by her 
industry at college. 

Ansonia High School. 
Ansonia, Conn. 
Household Economics. 
Executive Board (2). 





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■ ^^ 


If- 




■ 



-^m 



Evelyn Emerson 

"Bussie" 

"What can say more than this rich praise, that you alone 
are you." 

"Bus" is a girl just "full of pep." She enjoys good 
lectures, likes an argument, is an advocate of Suffrage, 
has a keen interest in social work and Socialism, appre- 
ciates good fun and is a friend worth while. 

Brattleboro High School. 

44 Putney Road, Brattlehoro. \'t. 

Household Economics. 

Senior Prom Usher (3), President Vermont Chili (4), 

Dormitory Government Council (4), Assistant 

Chairman Vespers Committee (4). 



54 



Anna Helen Enarson 

We have reason to congratulate ourselves upon rescu- 
ing Anna, with some difficulty, from the sad fate of being 
a "high-brow." Anna's chief trait is her sincerity, which 
is rather startling at times. She has many minor ac- 
complishments of a culinary character, being an excellent 
coffee maker. 

Montclair High School. 
Montclair, N. J. 
Secretarial. 



Lillian C. Fee 



"Bubbles" 



'Babe" 



"What greater or better gift can we offer the republic than 
to teach and instruct our youth." — Cicero. 

Perhaps, Lillian, Cicero might have helped you with 
"that settlement class." Who knows what pearls of 
wisdom dropped from your tongue have found settings ! 
Lillian is one of our sweetest girls, one whom we all love 
and shall remember. 

West Roxbury High School. 

156 Forest Hills Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Basketball (2, 3), Endowment Committee (3), S.A.A. 

Committee (4), Mandolin Club (3, 4), Glee Club 

(4), Choir (4). 




Marion Gertrude Fish 

"Gibby" "Fishie" 

"For she is pretty, and she is cheery, 
No matter what the weather ; 
The world is good and the people are good 
And we are all good fellows together." 

If Marion did have any clouds in her life, we're sure 
they would all have silver linings. Pray tell us, my dear, 
how you preserve a cheerful mien and unsoured disposi- 
tion amidst all the trials and tribulations of a college 
course ! 

Somerville Latin School. 

16 Fosket Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




55 




Florence Flanders 

Florence's motto is "Perseverance conquers all"- — es- 
pecially when she's tatting and studying. But it's a good 
motto, for she gets results. 

Hampton Institute. 
New Hampton, N. H. 
Household Economics. 




Esther Foster 

"The Sex is ever to a Soldier kind." 

sang Homer, but we guess Esther had a hard time mak- 
ing them remember to be kind, when she tried to garner 
in the Comfort bags made by the Quarantined Girls. 

Point Pleasant High School. 
Bay head ; N. J. 
Secretarial. 




Helen Miller Foster 

This is a sketch of what Helen is not, rather than 
what she is. First, dear reader, she is not as conscientious 
as she looks even though she did on one occasion return 
a nickel in a telephone booth. She isn't at all solemn al- 
though she takes charge of our Sunday vespers, she isn't 
a grind, but one thing she is — a might)' fine girl. 

Hingham High School. 

Hingham Centre, Mass. 

Librarv. 

Mandolin Club (2, 3, 4), Chairman Corridor Commit- 
tee (3), Chairman Decoration Committee. Junior 
Prom (3), Assistant Chairman Vespers Commit- 
tee (3), Chairman (4). Executive Hoard (4). 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (4), ,Usher Senior- Prom (3). 



56 



1\„\<~JJK<Ao>.<M4, 



Doris Isabel Frizzell 

"Dottie" "Dosie" 

Her fingers are not blunted. 

Though you'd almost think they'd be, 
From rapid and long hammering 

On the typewriter key. 
And really, though to some unknown, 

In all her work and schemes 
She has wit and capability 

Far greater than our dreams. 

Colebrook Academy. 
Colebrook, N. H. 
Secretarial. 




Harriet Louise Fuller 

"Four things a man must learn to do 
If he would make his record true: 
To think without confusion clearly ; 
To love his fellow men sincerely ; 
To act from honest motives purely ; 
To trust in God and heaven securely." 

This describes Harriet to a T. She's a good student, 
a splendid example of the "Northfield" type of girl, and 
above all, the truest friend ever! 

Northfield Seminary. 
64 Davis Street, New Haven, Conn. 
Household Economics. 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet and Chairman of Mission Study 
Committee (3). 




Winifred R. George 

"Winnie" 
"She loves her work and shuns no duty." 
Winnie is the busiest member of this most wonderful 
class. And how she revels in her activities! She cuts 
stencils with a vengeance, she literally haunts the type- 
writing rooms, and carries off excellent marks in class 
work. Her leisure moments she devotes to gathering in 
ads for the "Mic." Yet Winnie is never too busy for 
a laugh, a joke, and a good time. 

Maiden High School. 

58 Waite Street, Maiden, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Business Manager Persimmons (3), Advertising Man- 
ager Microcosm (4), Chairman Prom Invitation 
Committee (3), Endowment Fund (4). 




Yrua . V%v,. ^.pWa^ 



57 




Louise A. Giblin 

The first of the triumvirate of the General Science 
"Lou's"! She's very clever and very witty, but — oh, 
how she giggles. Whether it be at the discovery of a 
wrong chemistry experiment or of a person's mental 
status as revealed by intelligence tests, she scatters her 
contagious mirth everywhere. 

Girls' Latin School. 

37 Mayfield Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

General Science. 

Speaker Sophomore Luncheon (2), Executive Board 
(3). Senior Prom Usher (3), President of Dra- 
matic Association (4). 




Helen Hawthorne Gillette 

"Gill" "Gilly" 

To really appreciate Gill you must work beside her in 
Chem Lab. or cooking lab., or some such disposition-try- 
ing place. In the four long troublous years she has failed 
absolutely to develop one single bona fide grouch ! ! As a 
result we others suffer by comparison. 

Revere High School. 

113 Fenwood Avenue, Revere, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Sophomore Luncheon Committee (2). Track Walk 
(2), Glee Club Choir (2, 3, 4), Manager Class 
Basketball (3), Secretary-Treasurer Musical As- 
sociation (4), Y.W.C.A. (4), Hockey Varsity (4). 




Margaret L. Gladwin 

"Peg" 

Oh, Peg, that we had one tenth your poise! We are 
always glad to claim you for a friend, for it truly seems 
an honor. In small and great things you are equally 
efficient ; in tripping the light fantastic toe you have no 
superior, and in managing our Glee Club you are just 
as capable and dependable. 

Westfield High School. 

Westfield. Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Class Secretary (1), Basketball (1), Choir (3. 4). Glee 

Club (3.4). Manager (4), Junior Prom Usher (2). 

Senior Prom Usher (31. 



58 



Abbie G. Glover 

"A. G." 

"A merry heart makelh a cheerful countenance." 

Abbie surely possesses an enviable disposition — even 
the early morning rides from Somerville on late and 
crowded cars have never been known to disturb her 
equanimity. She is good-natured — always. 

Somerville High School. 

36 Tufts Street, Somerville; Mass. ; 

Library. 



MHJ^^.wnthJ. 




Bertha Madeline Govan 

Bertha is another speedy Secretarial Senior, the happy 
possessor of a Remington medal, but so unassuming is 
she in all that she does, that only her close friends know 
of her accomplishments. And dignity! The tall figure 
of our Bertha coming along the corridors is to the Fresh- 
men as twenty "Ssh" signs are to the same proverbially 
verdant class. 

Cambridge Latin School. 

47 Wendell Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



Helen Gertrude Grady 

We are all familiar with Helen's smile, for it is one 
that won't come off. Whenever you want anything done, 
Helen will do it. Surely this good nature of hers will 
make her an ideal "skret" (secretary). 

Medford High School. 

19 West Street, Medford, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



59 








Marion Elizabeth Grady 

Ever ready as a friend, 

Doing kind things without end, 

Modest, generous, glad to lend, 

That's our Marion. 
Possessed of knowledge always clear, 
Forever steadfast and sincere, 
Yes, in fact, she's quite a dear, 

Is our Marion. 

Medtord High School. 

19 West Street, Medford, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Lillian B. Graham 

"Lilly Ann" 

You would never think to look at this quiet, unassum- 
ing child that real honest-to-goodness artistic talent lurked 
therein. Yet 'tis there as you will see if you but glance 
through this book. Lillian's sunny nature and marvelous 
disposition make her loved by eveiyone, and all 1917 
wishes her the highest success the world can give. 

East Boston High School. 
372 Meridian Street, East Boston, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Choir (3), Art Editor Microcosm (4), Endowment 
Fund Committee (4). 




Eleanor R. Gregory 

"El" "Twin" 
"Youth is the proper time for love." 

"A-choo, a-choo!" "What's the matter, El? In love 
again ?" 

El believes in rest, both physical and mental. She 
regularly sleeps from four to six. Then at dinner she 
-entertains us with her dreams. Never mind, El, you 
are four-fifths intelligence, as has been proved. 

Portsmouth High School. 

317 Park Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Secretarial. 

Tennis (1), Secretary-Treasurer New Jersey Club (2). 
President New Jersey Chili (3). Executive Com- 
mittee (1). 

60 



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Esther Ryerson Gregory 

"Twin" 

"I count myself in nothing else so happy 
As a soul remembering my good frieTuls." 

Esther has the distinction of being a half of our 
only pair of twins. She is an interested student of cur- 
rent eyents and deserves the credit of arousing the in- 
terest of many of us. 



Portsmouth High School. 

317 Park Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Household Economics. 



;.H^f% 




Katherine Marie Hagerty 

"Kay" "Kate" 

Busy time goes the fastest 

So we learn in Psych ; 
But how to make time fairly fly, 

Ask Kay, she knows all right. 

Never a minute to spare 

Lessons to do, not done, 
But when th' instructor says "Who knows?" 

Katherine's always the one. 

Roxbury High School. 
Walnut Court. Roxbury, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Elizabeth Stickney Hammond 

"Betty" 

A maid yvho's neat 

And rather petite, 

Very fond of sports and fun ; 

Her smile's a treat. 

She's very sweet, 

And all of our hearts has yvon. 

Dana Hall. 

.34 France Street, Norwalk, Conn. 

Household Economics. 

Cheer Leader (2), Chairman Junior-Senior Party (3). 




61 






Kathleen M. Haney 

"Kay" 

Four long years have made us all acquainted with 
Kathleen's smile and wit, which is only exceeded by her 
excellent typewriting. Some day we expect to hear of 
her rivalling Miss Fritz in an international speed con- 
test. 

Girls' High School. 

29 Beech Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Helen Louise Harlow 

"Hel" 

By vote of the class of 1917 Helen will be presented 
with a book of synonyms when she leaves Simmons, for 
how can anyone think of seven different ways of saying 
the same thing in a week? This will supply the in- 
genuity which Helen, as well as all Simmons, lacks, ac- 
cording to recently discovered intelligence tests. 

N.B. In this all-too-brief sketch we very carelessly 
forgot to mention Helen's hearty laugh. She has one. 

Leavenworth High School. 

Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Secretarial. /^-- 

Prom Usher (3, 41, Class Vice-Presidfitfc f3T, Student 
Government Council (3), ^hair/nan Senior Lun- 
cheon (4). - |. (J 

U ' ' ^ 
Elvira Pena Hass 

E veryone loves her 
L oyal and true 
V ery good fun 
I assure you. 
R eady for jokes, and 
A lways in a mess, 

H aving a smile 
A nd giving a caress; 
S ure of a welcome, 
S aucv too, 



El 



vira Hass — this means you. 



Taunton High School. 
Rehoboth. Mass. 
Household Economics. 



62 



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Ina Hawes 

Ina is surely one of the broad-minded girls of our 
class. Ask her about current events or ancient history ; 
about Ballet Russe or amateur theatricals — on all live 
topics you will find her well posted. Discussions — she 
dotes on them ; and as for questions — oh, what crimes are 
committed in your name ! 

Oxford High School. 
Oxford. Mass. 
Library. 




Edna Fairfield Haynes 

" Tis love that makes the world go round." 

Edna has a very taking way and possesses valuable 
knowledge on the all-important Man. But she is seen 
at her best explaining rules and awful penalties to be- 
wildered, terror-stricken Freshmen. 

Townsend High School. 
15?/2 Central Street. Methuen, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Glee Club, Choir (1, 2), House Chairman (2, 3. 4), 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (4). 




^ 



Madge Marie Heald 

Madge makes a "Dearie" of us all, enjoys the gay mo- 
ments and finds pleasure in fuming over her troubles. 
She serves as a very excellent medium for the transmis- 
sion of the wishes of the Secretarial Department to the 
Secretarial Seniors and vice versa. 

Brighton Academy. 
Lovell, Maine. 
Secretarial. 




63 




Pauline Steele Hitt 



"Paulinelet" 



•Paul" 




Why is it, Pauline, that you score a hit on every oc- 
casion? Because you're a Hitt by nature? (A very 
poor pun. ) We who know you think it's rather your 
fascinating nonchalance, your all-round good fellowship, 
and your God-given sense of humor. 

Margaretville High School. 
Margaretville. N. Y. 
Household Economics. 



Grace A. Hodges 

Unlike the lilies of the field, 

Who neither toil nor spin, 
Is our Grace Hodges, undisturbed 

By all the noise and din 
Of college halls and college mates, 

A bustling, busy mob, 
Who talk and think and plan and fret 
About a far-off job. 
She does her work while they sit and 

Indulge in idle chatter; 
She wins her goal with calm content 

And too — with some gray matter. 

Foxboro High School. 
Foxboro, Mass. 
Household Economics. 



Jennie Louise Holbrook 

"Jane" 

East Douglas possesses the unique distinction of being 
the home of a leading weather prophet, for Jane can ob- 
tain an olfactory image of a storm days in advance. 
When Jane says, "It smells like rain," then rain we surely 
have. 

If you write to Jennie desiring an immediate reply, 
remember that violet stationery produces the best re- 
sults. More information on this subject will be given 
gratis to interested parties. 

Uxbridge High School. 

20 Pleasant Street, East Douglas, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



64 



Mabel Helen Holland 

Unruffled? Goodness, yes! This is Mabel's most 
salient characteristic. Why, after a morning of Short- 
hand, Typewriting and Accounts, she emerges calm and 
undisturbed as ever. Her pleasant smile is a mighty 
friendly greeting in the morning, something we have come 
to look for and expect. 

Oliver Ames High School. 
North Easton, Mass. 
Secretarial. 



>> 



\KA.. 



(Uc^Lu 




Olive Hopkins 

"Bunny" 

We all wish that we had Olive's enviable trait of not 
worrying as well as her enthusiasm for life in general, 
especially for life in a dormitory, which to her has the 
charm of a new picture book. 



Waltham High School. 

210 Ash Street, Waltham, Mass 

Secretarial. 

Glee Club, Choir (4) 



o^ 



> 



^ 



Ruth Allison Hudnut 



"Imp" 



"Peanut" 



"Here's to the bachelor girl. 

The maid with a fearless soul, 

Who's equal to every emergency, 

And always reaches her goal." 

And here we have the champion defender of our rights ! 
As the Gentle ( ?) woman from Massachusetts Ruth would 
be a valuable asset and add much zest to Congressiona 
debates, for her special forte lies in argumentation. There 
are many courses here that she doesn't approve of and 
doesn't "see any sense in at all," but she gets a whole lot 
of fun out of everything, nevertheless, and always lias 
a joke to make us laugh. 

Brookline High School. 

155 William Street. New Bedford, Mass. 








>lrS. JrU -Vl.llcJMtrtfe. 




Louise Patricia Johnson 

"Lou" 
"The only way to have a friend is to be one." 
She makes a great impression on the Freshmen, for 
they think she's dignified. Not that we wish to deprive 
her of their good opinions, but oh — if they could only 
hear her string of jokes and ditties! To do Louise jus- 
tice we must admit that if you want anything done, from 
/die mere selling of tickets to winning the shot put event 
on Track Day, you'll have to "let Louise do it." Do 
you wonder she's so popular among her numerous friends? 
Brookline High School. 
205 Davis Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 
General Science. 

Baseball Manager (1), Basketball (1, 2). Captain (2), 
Track (1, 2), Class Vice-President (2), Treasurer 
Student Government (2), Prom Usher (2), Execu- 
tive Board (4). 

Anna N. Jones 

"Anne" 
"Compel me not to toe the mark 
Be ever prim and true. 
But rather let me do these things 
That I ought not to do." 

But do not judge Anne perverse from the sentiment 
of these lines. They merely signify that she likes to put 
her own individuality into her work, that is, to go to 
Shorthand the third hour when her schedule says it should 
be the second. Anne has the happy faculty of being in- 
terested in a good many things. Therefore, we think 
she ought to succeed in any line of work she may devote 
herself to. 

Northboro High School, Dean Academy. 

Northboro, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Student Editor of the Quarterly (4). 

Rose Winchester Karnan 

"Our deeds determine us as much as we determine our deeds." 

A rose has blossomed in our midst, 
A modest, unassuming flower ; 

Whose smile, as if by sunshine kissed, 
Has made us happier every hour. 

She's energetic, cool, and calm ; 

Each duty is a pleasure. 
Her thoughts she does not all confide, 

But guards them like a treasure. 

Hyde Park School. 

48 Birch Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

66 



Eleanore Frances Keith 

Gentle reader, words are superfluous when we come 
to the president of the best class that ever went out of 
Simmons' halls! The statistics below have a wealth of 
meaning; they tell of Eleanore's popularity as well as 
capabilities. But she has one striking weakness really 
to be deplored in one so young, that is a passionate lean- 
ing toward bright hosiery! Time, no doubt, will correct 
this giddy tendency. 

New High School. 
"Jackson Homestead," Newton, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Class President (4), Chairman Sophomore Luncheon 
(2), Persimmons Board (2), Microcosm Board 
(3, 4), Class Treasurer (3), Glee Club (1, 2, 3), 
Class Hockey (3, 4), Varsity Hockey Team (4). 



Katherine Kimball 

"Kay" "Katink" 

Music is Kay's long suit. Besides organizing a Sim- 
mons orchestra, she finds time to play in the Mandolin 
Club, have a good time, and of course — drink of the 
Pierian Spring. 

Littleton High School. 

Harwood Ave., Littleton, Mass. 

Library. 

Leader of Orchestra (4), Mandolin Club (2, 3, 4). 




Frances Elizabeth King 

"Fran" 

Sure and steady 

Always ready 
Her knowledge to impart, 

We soon depend 

Upon this friend 
With her loving, loyal heart. 



Holyoke High School. 

2 Magnolia Avenue, Holyoke, 

Household Economics. 



Mass. 




67 



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Anna M. Kirby 

Sing a song of sewing, 
Stitches small and neat. 

By a dainty maiden, 
Who is ever sweet. 

Pretty is she to walk with, 
Pleasant to dance with too, 

Witty of course to talk with, 
And to all her classmates true. 

South Boston High School. 

88 G Street, South Boston, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Ruth Lander 

You mystified us, Ruth, when you elected every sew- 
ing course in the curriculum, but now we know and un- 
derstand. Seventeen offers her hearty good wishes to 
her merry, cheery classmate. 

Farmington State Normal, Maine. 
235 The Fellsway, East Maiden. Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Edna Pomeret Lane 

"Ed" 

We wonder why Edna thinks Amherst is one of the 
largest cities in A-Iassachusetts. Surely it is not because 
of its historical merit or its commercial importance! 
Someone has suggested that it is a center of learning. 
Edna herself will not admit her reasons for coming to such 
a conclusion, but we think that we have finally found 
the solution. 



Girls' Latin School. 

469 Meridian Street, East Boston, Mass. 

Secretarial^, ' 

ir Committee (4). Secretary of Student 
Council (4). 



C h airJKTTTTo n o r 
^5"Tji>vernment 



68 



Phyllis Lapham 

"Phyl" "Phyd" 

A "bigger, better, and busier" Phyllis would be an 
impossibility. We don't want her any bigger, for good 
things always come in small packages. We couldn't find 
a better friend, and no one could be any busier than Phyl 
with her music, Y.W., and "what not." 

Dorchester High School. 

20 Milwood Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Mandolin Club (1, 2. 3. 4), Leader (4), Secretary 
Y.W.C.A. (3), Chairman Baccalaureate Commit- 
tee (4). 




Fay A. Lawrence 

"Fifi" 

A well-loved young lady who is both cute and sen- 
sible — that's Fifi. She is a quiet body, yet one who seems 
always to entertain any group in which she may be. Se- 
crets are safe with Fi ; she is one who does not tell all 
she knows, and is even given to forgetting much. 

Tilton Seminary. 
Tilton, N. H. 
Secretarial. 

Chairman Guest Committee, Junior Prom (3), Class 
Flower Committee (3). 




Eva Leland 

She came to us when we were half way through, this 
charming athlete. We congratulate her for her success 
in the world of sports ; we also congratulate the owner of 
the Deke pin. 

Holliston High School. 
4 Curve Street, Holliston, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Class Delegate to Silver Bay (3), Basketball (3, 4), 
Captain (3), Track (3), Varsity Hockey (4). 




69 





Julia Alice McCabe 

"Julie" "Judy" 

Julie has a joke for every occasion and a smile for 
everyone. She scatters little kindnesses everywhere, is 
true blue, and a mighty good friend. Here's to the high- 
est success in whatever path you turn, Julie! 

North Attleboro High School. 

370 Smith Street, Providence, R. I. 

Secretarial. 

Speaker Sophomore Luncheon (2), 

Dramatic Committee (4), Cheer 

Glee Club, Choir (4). 



Dramatics (3), 
Leader ("3, 4), 



C*-^*y^X.v 



Cecilia R. McCarthy 

A sweet, calm, quiet, pleasant, fun-loving bunch of 
lovableness is our Cecilia — one we are glad to have 
known and shall never forget. 

Haverhill High School. 

129 Kenoza Avenue, Haverhill, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Student Conduct Committee (2). 




Mabel Linton Mackenzie 

"Mibs" 

Mabel certainly does her share in keeping up the motto 
behind the show-case, for she "keeps smiling" all the 
time, no matter whether dictation is at 70 or at 120. 
However, we believe that her policy has made the show- 
case a very popular place, and has won much trade for it. 

West Roxbury High School. 

101 Ardale Street, Roslindale. Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Executive Board (3), Sophomore Play (2). 



70 




Mary Margaret McLotjghlin 

"Alary Mac" "Merry" 

Although Mary has proved herself efficient as a Secre- 
tarial student, we cannot help thinking that her natural 
love for biology and chemistry would have made her feel 
more at home in the General Science Department. 

We often wonder how Mary stands the strain of car- 
rying all the manuscripts necessary in editing the Mic, 
and would suggest that she buy a Ford, which we heard 
she could get at reduced rates, to carry them back and 
forth to college. 

Worcester Classical High School. 

110 Vernon Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Editor-in-Chief of the Microcosm (4), Microcosm 
Board (3), Dramatics (3), Sophomore Play (2), 
Chairman Cap and Gown Committee (4), En- 
dowment Fund Committee (3), Chairman Prom 
Invitation Committee (4). 

Jessie McMullin 

"Jess" 
Jess is one of our most energetic and versatile mem- 
bers. There is nothing she can't do, from pursuing 
diphtheria germs to playing basketball and hockey. We 
hear now that she even has a desk in the English office. 
In her spare moments she helps run the show-case, boosts 
the Y.W.C.A. and sings in the Glee Club. When does 
she study? We don't know. We have only one thing 
against her. She is a man-hater ! 

Cambridge Latin School. 

123 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Tennis (1). Track, Easketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Manager 
Basketball (4). Secretary S.A.A. (3), Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet (2, 3, 4), Microcosm Board (4), President 
Silver Bay Club (4), Hockey (4), Glee Club (3, 4), 
Prom Usher (2, 3), Speaker Sophomore Luncheon 
.2). 

Katharine Manning 

"Kay" 
We are so sorry to suspect that Katharine has entirely 
given up her ardent ambition for a position in South 
America! However, if one wishes to practice the "outer 
edge"' and other fancy skating during spare moments, per- 
haps one would do better to remain in her vicinity. Two 
things are very noticeable in Kay's actions — she has a 
tendency to accompany instructors on her waj' to college,, 
and she believes in common-sense shoes. 

East Orange High School, N. J. 

204 Langley Road. Newton Centre, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

71 




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C. 




Pearl Lillian Mason 



"P. L." 



•Pearlygig" 



"Come and manage a library 
Pearl Mason will show you how." 
(With apologies to "Simmons College.") 

She's studied Book Selection and Continental Lit. ; 
And Reference, and Catalogues — Home Lib'ries bit by bit 
Till she's found out to perfection how everything is run, 
And can tell you in a moment just how it should be done. 
The fruits of all her knowledge she's giving to the West. 
Best wishes, Pearl, go with you. We know they'll get 
the best. 

Adams High School. 

1 Newark Street, Adams, Mass. 

Library. 




Beatrice Mauk 

Beatrice made a happy choice of courses at Simmons, 
for she had scarcely started upon her theoretical work 
when she decided to apply it practically as soon as she left 
college. For this same mysterious reason she's all ab- 
sorbed in cooking and sewing and all the domestic arts. 

Van Wert High School. 
Van Wert, Ohio. 
Household Economics. 



M 


| 




w 



Elisabeth Miller 

"Betty" 

Her cheeks are pink, 

Her eyes are blue. 

Her smile is winning, 

Her heart is true. 

Betty is our most famous class member. She it is who 
spent six weeks in solitary confinement in Boston City 
Hospital. Seventeen rejoiced when she came back as 
lively as ever, for Betty is a popular young person. To 
meet her is to like her; to know her is to love Iter. 

Warren High School. 

315 Mahoming Avenue, Warren. Ohio. 

Household Economics. 

Secretary Dormitory Government (3), Chairman Pro- 
gramme Committee, hinior Prom (3), Secretary 
Class (4), President Ohio Club (4). 



72 



B. ROMAYNE MlLLIKEN 

"Billie" 

Romayne is tall, 
And is loved by all. 
She has an entrancing smile. 
She's a mighty fine sport, 
An all-round good sort, 
But, reader dear, oh how she grinds ( ?) 
If 'twixt study and pleasure, 
'Twixt working and leisure 
She must choose between the ways, 
She decides on the latter 
And yet — I don't flatter — 
She comes out with bright gleaming A's. 

Girls' Latin School. 

106 Fayerweather Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Sophomore Pla} r (2). 

Mildred Morton 

"Mil" "Millie'' 

"She doesn't lose her head, even for a minute ; 
She plays well the game and knows the limit, 
And still gets all the fun there's in it." 

This describes Mil perfectly. She's the dependable 
kind of girl who doesn't say half as much as she does — 
hence her admirable capability in all she undertakes. 
Other equally important features are her neatness and 
her curly hair. 

Newton High School. 
80 Elm Street, West Newton, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Business Manager Microcosm (4), Glee Club, Choir 
(X 2). 

Harriet Mower 

"Hat" 

Although Harriet didn't join us till our Junior year, 
we're more than glad she chose '17, for a more loyal, 
sincere friend is not found among our ranks. Harriet 
drinks deep of the Pierian spring and shows marvelous 
conscientiousness in everything she attempts. 

Girls' High School. 

7 Fottler Road, Mattapan, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Choir (4). 

73 




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Catherine Ferguson Munt 

"Kitty" "Kay" 

"Tell me, pretty maiden, are there 
Any more at home like you?" 

How will the Secretarial Department ever keep house 
without Kitty? Is there anything she can't do, and find 
enty of time to do it in ? And the funny part of it 
she thinks there's fun in it ! ! ! From eight to five she 
works all day. Then humming she puts her work away, 
and trips home to "Pete." 






Northbridge High School. 
46 Hill Street, Whitinsville, 
Secretarial. 



Mass. 





Louise Wilton Murphy 

"Easa" 

"Otherwise known as the rejuvenating influence." 

Louise has the delightful characteristic of excusing all 
the faults of her friends except "peevishness." She prac- 
tices what she preaches, too, for she is always cheerful 
herself. She has the sort of humor which has stood four 
years of constant usage here and yet has never grown tire- 
some. We regret that more of her classmates haven't had 
the pleasure of, at least, her acquaintance. But Louise 
is too absorbed by the burdens of a "bud" to devote any 
extra time to college. 

Girls' High School. 

27 Cordis Street, Charlestown, Mass. 

General Science. 

Chairman Music Comnjittee, Junior Prom (3). 



"YVU* . <ft<r^<: 






~1 



Mary Janet Murphy 

"May" 

Whenever you see Mary J. coming you may 
Edna is not far away, for 

Mary has a little Lane, 

And everywhere that Mary goes 

That Lane is sure to go. 

Natick High School. 

4 Grove Street, Natick, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



74 



Lucy H. Nash 

"Lu" 

And now we come to the Eurydice of 1917 ! She leads 
in all our musical activities and is responsible for the 
success of our Glee Club concerts. And what persistence 
Lu has ! Ask her how many times she has tried out for 
soloist — she won't mind, she can take a joke. 

Brighton High School. 

9 Mansfield Street, Allston, Mass. 

Household Economics. 



Glee Club. Choir (2. 3. 4), Junior 
Vice-President of Class (4), 



Prom Usher (2), 
President Musical 



Association (4), Class Hockey (4). 



Louise O'Malley 

Oh here comes Louise in a hurry and rush, 
She's so very ambitious, she makes us all blush. 
With her settlement class of nine sturdy boys 
Her life is bereft of all peace and joys. 
With biology, sewing, and histories galore 
She is not contented, but cries out for more. 
If we miss any meetings she sternly upbraids, 
And she's always right there for the suffrage parades. 

Gorliam High School. 
Gorham. N. H. 
Household Economics. 



Margaret Ormond 

"Peg" 
"Of their own merits modest men are dumb." 

One has to know Margaret real well to gain the priv- 
ilege of her confidences. And then what interesting tales 
she tells of other climes, and how graphically she por- 
travs them ! Peg is one of the most broad-minded girls 
of 1917. 

Randolph-Macon Institute, Ecole de Jeunes Filles, 

Switzerland. 
Princeton, New Jersey. 
Library. 



75 




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Ernestine Packard 

"Some sweet employ for leisure minutes choose, 
And let your very pleasures have their use." 

Behold another Library senior pursuing knowledge 
ruthlessly, and delving into the dusty volumes of an- 
tiquity! Such is Ernestine. But — added to this praise- 
worthy interest in school work is a positive weakness for 
Vmovies and talking. How Ernestine does love to talk! 
My, how that girl's dulcet tones float over the transom ! 

Watertown High School. 
4 Park Avenue, Winchester, Mass. 
Library. 

Baseball (1, 2), Track walk (2), Mandolin Club (4), 
Dormitory^ Council (^)-,i 




Alice Parker 

"Al" "Sleepy" 

From a demure little Freshman to a Senior tall, Alice 
has grown beloved by us all. And she asks such ques- 
tions and propounds such theories that Dr. Moore stops 
his lecture to laugh, and even Dean Arnold smiles. 

Woodward Institute. 

15 Hancourt Court, Quincy, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Mary Frances Parker 

Few people are as skillful as Mary not only in physical 
but in mental gymnastics. Mary broke the broad jump 
record at track our Freshman year, and she has been 
busy breaking records ever since. It's just as easy for 
her to jump thirteen feet, four and one-half indies, as it 
is to feed the French war orphans and inoculate all her 
friends against typhoid. 

Roxbury High School. 

Cooksville, Md. 

Track, Basketball, Hockey. 



76 



Arabelle Parnell 

"Belle" 

It Belle doesn't get a position in which she can as- 
sume entire responsibility and preside over the stove we 
fear all happiness will flee. You know she's a very 
capable sort, who doesn't lend a gracious ear to excessive 
frivolity and yet has managed to have a lot of fun out of 
her four years in college. 

Manchester High School. 

327 Orange Street. Manchester, N. H. 

Household Economics. 

Secretary-Treasurer New Hampshire Club (4), Dormi- 
tory Council (4), Chairman Senior-Faculty Com- 
mittee (4). 



Abby Elizabeth Partridge 

"Part" "Patty" 

Way back in Sophomore days Patty showed us her 
histrionic ability, and as keeper of our official records 
in our Junior year, she showed what a secretarial course 
at Simmons can do. A very capable girl leaves us in 
June with hearty wishes from all of us. 

Bluehill George Stevens Academy. 

Bluehill, Me. 

Secretarial. 

Toastmistress Sophomore Luncheon (2), Vice-Presi- 
dent Maine Club (3), President (4), Class Secre- 
tary (3). 



Mary Sophia Peters 

Mary doesn't think this is a hard old world, but she 
does think there is a lot to do in it. So say we all of us. 
But never mind. Alary, remember that "filled time is 
shorter in living through it, and longer in memory." 
Think of the good time we are going to have looking 
back on our Senior year, Mary, and rejoice. 

Abbot Academy. 

37 Lowell Street. Andover, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



77 




Margaret Peirce 

"How irksome is this music to my heart : 
When such strings jar, what hope of Harmony?" 

We suppose these to be Margaret's sentiments during 
the tedium of rehearsal, but we know that no such 
thoughts could enter her head when the Mandolin Club 
plays in public. 



o- 




Chelsea High School. 

36 Cary Avenue, Chelsea, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Mandolin Club (2), Manager (3). 

Mary V. Pollard 

"Polly" 

"We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, but 
others judge us by what we have already done." 

Until Mary was elected Junior president, we hadn't 
fully realized her manifold capabilities. Then we all 
decided that anyone who could safely lead the class 
through the pitfalls of Junior Prom was the only one to 
guide Dormitory government in the way it should go. 
It's superfluous to say that we all love and admire her, 
so we'll just wish her the very best success possible. 

Black River Academy. 

Proctorsville. Vt. 

Household Economics. 

President Dormitory Government (4), Class President 
(3), Delegate to Silver Bay (3), Delegate to In- 
tercollegiate Student Government Conference (4), 
Class Executive Board (3. 4), Varsity Hockey 
(4), Senior Prom Usher (3), Sophomore Play 
(2), Secretary Vermont Club (3). 



Cordella Rose Potter 

Steadfast and purposeful she wins her way through all 
her lessons and everyone's heart as well. Cordelia has 
a very convincing manner, as all who heard her forceful 
arguments for Wilson can testify. 

Almonte High School. 

53 Couch Street, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 



78 



Dorothea N. Rice 

"Dot" 

Dot's chief weaknesses are said to be a fondness for her 
teachers and a tendency to slumber peacefully during 
Psych. We wonder if her admiration for the faculty is 
caused by what Dr. Burtt might term the "soporific ef- 
fect'' of their lectures. 

Brighton High School. 

16 Elko Street, Brighton, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Gladys Estelle Richardson 

Gladys often worries a lot 
When truly there is no need, 

For lacking in brains she surely is not 
And we envy her them indeed. 

Conscientious she is, to be sure, 
But that's a very good trait, 

Quiet, too, and very demure. 

Unselfish, staunch, and straight. 



Woburn High School. 

53 Warren Avenue, Woburn, 

Secretarial. 



Mass. 



Christine I. Ricker 

"Chris" 

Tall and stately is our Chris, 
Dependable ever. 
Never ruffled, always calm, 
A true friend forever. 

She has one secret, overwhelming, never-to-be-satisfied 
passion in life — to wear pink! Perhaps she can in Hono- 
lulu where the sun is bright. 

Cambridge Latin School. 

42 Prentiss Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

President Athletic Association (4), Treasurer (2), 

Class Secretary (2), Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), S.A.A. 

Silver Bay Delegate (3), Chairman Dormitory 

Christmas Party (3), Junior Prom Usher (2). 

Senior Prom Usher (3), Student Government 

Council (4). 




79 




Margaret Riegel 

"Dutch" "Heinrich" 

Dutch is one of our many-sided girls. If she is not 
teaching a settlement class, she is at Symphony or at 
Ford Hall. Yes, she has a big heart and wide and 
varied tastes. We expect to hear great things of you 
after you leave Simmons, Dutch. 

Harrisburg High School. 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Household Economics. 

House Chairman (2), President Suffrage Club (2), 

Chairman Social and Civic Club (4), Treasurer 

Student Government (4). 



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Reena Roberts 

"To be a demonstrator was never my intention" — but 
all the same she can demonstrate, as her calmness and ac- 
curacy might suggest. A loyal classmate, always eager 
to help, and responsive to suggestions ! 

Somerville High School. 
11 Willow Street, Belmont, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Chairman Membership Committee, Simmons-Somer- 
ville Club. 



Helen Ruggles 

"Polly" 

"At sight of thee my gloomy soul cheers up, 
Mj' hopes revive and gladness dawns within me." 

Polly always has a smile. Even if she has twelve 
hundred pages of the "History of Modern Egypt" to 
read, she smiles. Even after she has read those twelve 
hundred pages and then learns there is an abridged copy, 
she smiles. We have guessed that the following must 
be Polly's motto: 

"Smile a while and while you smile another smiles and 
soon there are smiles and miles of smiles and life's worth 
while because you smile." 

Jamaica Plain High School. 

107 Richmond Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Library. 

Mandolin Club (3, 4). 

80 



Grace Huntington Rutan 

The year that Junior Prom makes memorable to all 
marked Grace's advent to Simmons from Wheaton. 
We're thankful for all favors, but we wish more of us 
could have become better acquainted with this fair ad- 
dition to our ranks. 

Maynard High School. 
Maynard. Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Etta Sara Sadow 

"Ettie" "Jess" 

She sews ; 
And still the wonder grows 
That Sewing 3 has taught her all she knows. 

Etta vowed that when she finished sewing she would 
never do any more, but she went to settlement and gave 
instructions about making boys' coats. Such is the 
frailty of woman ! But this shows Etta's unselfish dis- 
position. She is never too busy to help friends in need. 
Etta has some very decided opinions on class etiquette, 
and engages in heated debates at any time upon request. 

Plymouth High School. 

29 Russell Street. Plymouth, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

President Menorah Society (4), Hockey (4). 



Ethel M. Schuman 

"Schuie" 
''Whatsoever a girl seweth, that shall she also rip." 

Such is the decree of our Sewing Department. But 
cheer up, Ethel, lots of us have had the same troubles, 
and besides this practice makes you a "ripper of a girl." 

Columbia City High School. 
Columbia City, Indiana. 
Household Economics. 





81 




Miriam Segel 

From Household Ec to Social Science 
The step is not so long, 
And Miriam's spanned it to fulfill 
A purpose high and strong. 

One of the best friends a girl can have, and always 
at her post. 

Melrose High School. 

391 Pleasant Street, Melrose, Mass. 

Social Service. 




Gladys Anna Sheldon 

"Glad" 

Evidently Glad does not believe in the saying that 
"a ring on the hand is worth two on the phone." As 
she is awaj' most of the week-ends we never get a chance 
to ask her about it ; and therefore we must be content to 
remain in the dark depths of ignorance. 



Lee High School. 
Housatonic Street, 
Secretarial. 
Mandolin Club (1), 
eminent Counci 



Le 



Ma 



Basketball (1, 3), Dormitory Gov- 
(4), Chairman Senior Events (4). 



Adele R. Shohan 

"To those who know thee not, no words can paint — 
To those who know thee all words are faint." 

Those who know Adele can vouch for the applicability 
of these lines. She's our genius — a second Mary Antin 
— and the most promising Senior. Here's to the most 
brilliant success! 

Girls' High School, Boston. 

94 Harrishof Street, Roxbury, ilass. 

Secretarial. 

Socialist Club. Chairman (2). Class Representative (3), 
Executive Board (4). Vice-President Menorali So- 
ciety (4). Pcrsimv.ions Board (4). 



82 



Ruth C. Slade (Mrs. William F.) 

"A countenance in which did meet 
Sweet records, promises as sweet." 

At the beginning of our Sophomore year we were sur- 
prised to find that Ruth had enrolled under the banner 
of Hymen. We have often wondered why she didn't 
take Household Ec until we discovered the importance 
of clerical accounts. Ruth maintains a calm dignity 
on all occasions — except when procuring tickets for Billy 
Sunday. 

Portland High School. 
Southboro, Mass. 
Secretarial. 



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Alma Marie Smith 

"Bangs" 



n 



"Sport that wrinkled care derides 
And laughter holding both her sides." 

Alma's laugh has been a life-saver on many occasions. 
'She has enthusiasm enough to share with every girl in 
college, and when it comes to hustling for Persimmons 
subscriptions, she's "right there." Alma's motto is 
"Work while you work, play while you play, and dance 
while you dance." 

Miss Hall's School, Pittsfield. 

112 North Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Class Treasurer (2), Junior Prom Usher (2), Pel ■ 
simmons Board (3), Business Manager (4), Horse 
Chairman (2), Executive Board (4), S.A.A. Ex- 
ecutive Board (3), Basketball (2, 3). 



Fayetta Elizabeth Smith 

'Ta}-ette" 

We wonder why Fayetta didn't get the vote for the 
most versatile. She carries off" splendid grades and has 
such an outside interest that we feel confident she doesn't 
burn the midnight oil. Neatness and sweetness, thy name 
is Fayette ! 

Hartford High School. 

50 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 

Household Economics. 

Mandolin Club (1), Treasurer Connecticut Club (2). 

S3 







Vera Smith 

"Veazie" 
"There is not a moment without some duty." 
"Veazie" is very conscientious and thorough in ever)'- 
thing she undertakes, and is a firm believer in the max- 
im "Anything worth doing is worth doing well." 

Somerville High School. 

43 Electric Avenue, West Somerville, Mass. 

Household Economics. 



Florence J. Soden 

"Soddie" "Florrie" 

'I awoke before the morning, I was happy all the day, 
I never said an ugly word, but smiled and stuck to play." 

"By their deeds ye shall know them" 
So sang the poet of old. 
But Florence is known by her rollicking laugh 
And her smile is a joy to behold. 

She's especially good at her sewing, 

In hemming and tucking she shines; 
But she's really a star in dramatics 
"If not first, in the very first line." 

Egberts High School. 
Cohoes, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 

Dormitory Council (4), Choir (3, 4), Glee Club (4), 
Hockey (3, 4). 




^.B. 



Una M. Spaller 

"United States" "Uner" 

"Good humor only teaches charms to last 
Still makes new conquests and maintains the past." 

With her needle Una's skillful 

And all sewing does adore. 
She's taken every single course 

And wishes there were more! 

Some are glad she doesn't get her 



Painesville High School. 
89 W. Jackson Street, Painesvil 
Household Economics. 
Secretary and Treasurer Ohio 
Choir (4). 

84 



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wish. 



Club (4). Glee Club 



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Margaretta Ruth Spooner 

"Spooner" "Marge" "Gretta" 
"To know her is to love her." 

Gretta is one of the best evers. She is a sure cure 
for the blues — always jolly and always giving others a 
good time, whether it be in Psych lecture or at Durgin 
Parks (very plebeian taste, Gretta!) Margaretta comes 
from Harrisburg. Yes, we all know it. And, of course, 
Harrisburg is a mighty fine place to come from. It's 
on the Susquehanna River, and there are canoes on the 
river, aren't there, Gretta? And the moon rises over 
the river. Have you ever seen it, Gretta? 

Harrisburg High School, Lasell Seminary. 

117 Locust Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Household Economics. 

Basketball (1), Glee Club. Choir, 3, 4), Vice-President 

Pennsylvania Club (3), President (4), Religious 

Committee Y.W.C.A. (4). 

Katherine Gorham Sprague 

"Kay" 
"Today is ours; what do we fear? 
Today is ours ; we have it here ! 
Let's banish business, banish sorrow. 
To the gods belongs tomorrow." 

Kay armed with a hockey stick and ready for plav ! 
That's a characteristic picture. Dull cares are banished 
and she sallies forth picking up as many recruits on the way 
as she can. And did you ever see Kay when she wasn't 
having a good time — that is everywhere outside of the 
class-room ? Let us answer the question — No ! 

Newton High School. 

67 Webster Street, West Newton, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Choir (1, 2), Chairman Junior-Freshman Party (3), 
Chairman Snapshot Committee (3, 4), Assistant 
Cheer Leader (3, 4), Varsity Hockey (4), Cap- 
tain and Manager (4). 

Ada Keith Stanley 

"Ada K" 
Life without Hannah B. would be a pretty dull project 
to Ada. This demure looking maid has much "speed" 
— typewriting speed — to her, for she, too, possesses one 
of those rare medals. Ada came to us from Mt. Holyoke 
in Junior year to take all the courses in Spanish that 
the faculty would offer. 

Crosby High School. 

46 Coe Street, Waterbury, Conn. 

Secretarial. 

Mandolin Club (3), House Chairman (3). 



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85 



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Gladys E. Steele 

A quiet little body, 

Without much to say, 
But we who know her best, we think 

We'll hear of her some day. 
For her wonderful neat ways 

She is known throughout our college, 
Her appearance makes us feel it pays 

To chase dirt as well as knowledge. 

Miss Kimball's School for Girls, Bradford Academy. 
28 Flint Street, Somerville, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Alice Stevens 

"Al" 

Should you wander into the gym at noon you will more 
than likely find Alice playing for the dancers. If you 
wander farther you will learn that she plays accompani- 
ments for the Glee Club. Also she plays basketball. In 
short, she is an "all-round girl player." 

West Roxbury High School. 

9 Boxford Terrace, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Basketball (2, 3, 4), Glee Club Pianist (3. 4). 




Clara Louise Stover 

"How doth the busy little bee 
Improve each shining hour?" 

Here is another one of 191 7's little girls. Clara be- 
lieves that a stitch in time saves nine; therefore she burns 
the midnight oil, and accomplishes "sew" many things 
and manages to keep quiet about them. 

Newburyport High School. 

26 Olive Street, Newburyport, Mass. 

Household Economics. 



86 



Lois Idelle Tapley 



She came to us two years ago 

From her home in the "woolly West,' 

And all the girls who her do know 
Sav she's one of the very best. 

Kalamazoo Central High School. 
911 S. Park Street, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Library. 



Gladys Leeson Thompson 

"Tommy" 

"The world is good, and the people are good, 
And we're all good fellows together." 

Whether at work or whether at play 
You're sure to find Phoebe and Madge with Glad T. 
These inseparable three, if you'll let me confide, 
Are the biggest best sports that in North do reside. 

Norwich Free Academy. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Household Economics. 





Mabel H. Thompson 

A tiny maid, blue eyes, light hair, 
A deal of knowledge, a dainty air. 

That's Mabel! She's a busy little person, too — always 
has things done on time and sometimes ahead of time. 
Then she smiles serenely while the rest of us dash madly 
in at the eleyenth hour. "Woe is us, 'twas ever thus!" 
Mabel promises, to be a model secretary. 

n High School. 

51 Lakewood Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Chairman Pin and Ring Committee (2), Tennis 
Champion (2), Junior Prom Usher (2), Micro- 
cosm Board (4). 




87 




WlLLAMAY TOLAND 

"Billy" 

Don't worry; 'tis only Bill, the Socratic questioner! 
But she knows what and why she speaks, and we all 
profit by her inquiries — and incidentally by the time it 
takes to answer them. 

Franklin Academy. 
Burke, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 




Helen I. Tolman 

"Goobs" 

Helen's a jolly sort of girl, full of giggles and smiles, 
neat, ever witty and a regular tease. But she's just the 
kind we can none of us get along without. Just ask her 
about the little red-heads and watch her color change. 

Abington High School. 
Hanover, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




Harriet Dorothy Turner 

"Dot" "H" 

As for our affection you surely did win it 
But all the time you sure are the limit ! 

Yes, Dot, you surely are "the limit," but after all 
you're a mighty nice limit. After the Glee Club dance 
we certainly realize we're not the only ones that — well — 
that seem to approve of you. 

Reading High School. 

31 Woburn Street. Reading. Alass. 

Household Economics. 



88 



Dorothy Van Orden 5&w\ 

"Doit" "Dot" V 

"He is such a sweet man." Dorothy, you must re- 
member that sweetness is not a manly quality, but rather 
belongs to you. If we didn't like you so well we'd be 
frightfully green-eyed of your good looks and modish 
gowns. 

Butler High School. 

Pompton Lakes, New Jersey. 

Household Economics. 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (2), Usher Junior Prom (2). 



Margaret Walker 

"Peg- 
One of our demure maidens. She never seems£io chat- 
ter, and yet, when she does talk — could any Senior Secre- 
tarial take it? Peg is lively despite her demure manner, 
and is renowned for crocheting sweaters. 

Beverly High School. 
Beverly, ilass. 
Household Economics. 





Ida Walkey 

It's hard to picture thee as thou art. 

So fair of feature and warm of heart ; 

But this we can with truth all state, 

For thy kind, thoughtful deeds thou hast no mate. 

Saugus High School. 

37 Whitney Street, Cliftondale, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Honor Committee (4). 




89 




Adele Allen Waterman 

"Ar-delle" 

We know that she is 

An icthyologist of repute. 

A promoter of the Animal Rescue League. 

A successful Crusader. 

An accomplished weeper. 

A keen student of microscopic analysis. 

All these capabilities Adele possesses in the superlative 
degree, which shows that one has time here to develop 
sides equally as important as the scholastic. 

Rockland High School. 

481 Water Street, South Hanover, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



Harriet Weber 

Can you imagine a slightly corpulent maid being any- 
thing but good-natured and happy ? Well, Harriet is no 
exception for she is just as cheery as she looks. Her wit 
is as clear as crystal, and her rollicking laugh a dispeller of 
the deepest gloom. She furnishes amusement at all our 
parties, and portrays the dignified Caesar and the exuber- 
ant L,auncelot Gobbo with equal charm and originality 
of costume. 

West Des Moines High School, Iowa. 

22 Gilman Street, Madison, Wis. 

Secretarial. 

Glee Club (2), Usher Senior Prom (3). 




Helen Whiting 

"Bob" "Blackie" 

Ever since we came to college we have been told that 
it is best to work with diligence during work hours, and 
then be free to play during play hours. Helen, indeed, 
has accomplished this during her four years here. She 
hurries from lessons with such speed and accuracy that 
about the time the rest of us have stopped talking, along 
comes Helen ready to go out and play hockey. 

West Roxbury High School. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
Library. 

Hockey (3. 4). 



90 



Nancy Lillian Winn 



"Winnie 



-Lir 



"Winnie" is our "girl who smiles," smiles while she 
grinds, and grinds while she smiles ; even her daily travels 
to and from the source of all knowledge cast no cloud 
upon her sunny nature. But it's small wonder that she 
is so happy. Look at her intelligence mark! 



Winchester High School. 
514 Washington Street. W 
Secretarial. 



nchester, Mass. 



Margaret Osgood Wood 

"M. O." "Peg" 

"Silent waters are seldom shallow." 

And M.O. is anything but shallow. Peg has many 
capabilities, the most remarkable of which is, perhaps, 
her ability to read letters, oh such lengthy letters, without 
any comment. She's an excellent listener and a "rock 
of ages" for us blustering people who simply must rave 
and rant. 

Middleboro High School. 
Middleboro, Mass. 
Librarv. 




Victoria Zehringer 

"A pleasing countenance is no slight advantage." 

That makes two advantages Victoria has over the rest 
of us, the other being that she is at the end of the alpha- 
bet, and according to recently acquired knowledge in 
Psych we know that the end and beginning are the all- 
important positions to hold. 

Winthrop High School. 

21 Orlando Avenue. Winthrop, Mass. 

Household Economics. 





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' 






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'■ \ / 







91 



3Formw ilemtes of tlj? ©lass of 191 X 

NAME. HOME. 

ABBE, MARY N 279 Squantum St., Atlantic 

ACKERMAN, GRETCHEN 48 Abbott St., Nashua, N. H. 

ALLEN, EDITH R 115 Jackson St., Bangor, Me. 

ANSON, OLIVE E 12 Vesper St., Worcester 

BARKER, ELEANOR 34 Taylor St., Portland, Me. 

BARROWS, OLIVE 164 High St., Hartford, Conn. 

BATES, LILLIAN G : South Hanover 

BAUMLER, JANE I College St., Clinton, N. Y. 

BECKETT, LILLIAN M Trelawnv Bldg., Portland. Me. 

BLANCHARD, CHARLOTTE Barre 

BONZAGNI, ANNA B 67 Byron St., East Boston 

BOYD, ANNE G 11 Grampian Way, Dorchester 

BREESE, MIRIAM R 1403 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Pa. 

BURBANK, ELIZABETH H. (Mrs. Warren C. Weeks) 5 South Green St., Plymouth 

CHASE, MARIETTA L 25 Mechanic St., Webster 

CHURCH, MARGARET G 255 Culver Rd.. Rochester, N. Y. 

CHURCHILL, SALLY 1001 Main St., Berlin, N. H. 

CLARK, LEAH West Boylston 

CLARY, LOUISE V 32 Sprague St., Maiden 

COLBY, RUTH 74 Clinton Ave., Montclair, N. J. 

CONGDON, ANNA M 419 Broadway, Newport, R. I. 

COVELL, PR1SCILLA B. (Mrs. Chester S. Hardy) ... 244 Blossom St., Fitchburg 

CRADDOCK, HELEN G 824 West Onondaga St., Svracuse, N. Y. 

CROSBY, HELEN A 125 Washington Ave., Kingston, N. Y. 

CROSS, MYRA A Colebrook, N. H. 

DAVENPORT, ISABEL W 108 Gaylord Ave., Plymouth, Pa. 

DAVIS, DORRIS Contoocook, N. H. 

DAVIS, RUTH E 62 Beech St., Franklin, N. H. 

DAY, GLADYS C 103 Monument St., West Medford 

DOMERY, MARIAN S 129 Dore St., Albany, N. Y. 

DONNELLY, GLADYS S 808 E. 18th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DUGAN, MAY L 248 West St., Rutland, Vt. 

DUNCAN, MARGARET L Clearwater. Fla. 

ELLIS, STELLA D. (Mrs. Walter E. Snow) East Orange, N. J. 

ENGLUND, FLORENCE L New Sweden Station, Me. 

FARRELL, MAUDE C 88 Franklin St., Watertown 

FERGUSON, RUTH H 54 Pleasant St., Houlton, Me. 

FLEMING, ELIZABETH J Washington St., Norwood 

FRANCIS, RUTH 1 61 Boston Ave., West Medford 

FRENCH, BARBARA F 180 Parkway, Winchester 

FURBER, ROSE L. (Mrs. Ralph Borden) Honolulu, Hawaii 

FURBUSH, ABIGAIL A : 34 Murdock St., Brighton 

GAGE, MARJORIE H Parker St., North Reading 

GATES, LUCY L. (Mrs. Noah Nason) 14 Phillips St.. Westboro 

GILLIS, CLARICE E North Haven. Me. 

GRAY, RUTH A 3028 Wisconsin Ave.. Washington. D. C. 

GREEN, M. AILEEN 420 Union St., Schenectady, N. V. 

GRIFFIN, SYLVIA M 53 Kenwood Ave.. Worcester 

HALLER. PAULINE M 632 State St., Watertown. N. Y. 

HAMILTON, HELEN/E 386 Commonwealth Ave.. Boston 

HARVEY, FLORENCE T 361 Windsor Ave., Hartford. Conn. 

HILL, RUTH L ^ Marcv St., Southbridge 

HILTON. MARY O. (Mrs. Chester Patrick) Chicago. III. 

HODGES, HELEN R Torrington, Conn. 

HOLMES, DOROTHY F 135 Holly St.. Rutland. Yt. 

HUFF. EMMELYN Y North Edgecomb, Me. 

92 



NAME. HOME. 

KELLEHER. MAY F 11 Highland St., Ware 

KERR. FLORENCE E Titusville, Pa. 

KXEELAND, HELEN B Ridgebury, Conn. 

KINTZ. DOROTHY 60 Oakwood Rd„ Newtonville 

LIVINGSTON, DORRIS 64 Walnut St., Abington 

LIVINGSTON. RHODA E. (Mrs. Frank S. Larkin) .... 23 Turner St., Brighton 

MCCARTHY, MARGUERITE K 91 Lowell Rd., Winthrop 

McLOUGHLIN. KATHERINE A 74 Dakota St., Dorchester 

McLEOD, MAUDE L. (Mrs. Justin N. Rogers) . . . : Patten, Me. 

McMANAMA, FRANCES 162 Summer St.. Waltham 

MACY, CORINNE S Box 16, North Pembroke 

MARTIN, MARTORIE A 2 Crawford St., Roxbury 

MERRILL, HAZEL T 24 Stearns Ave., Lawrence 

MONTEITH. EVELYN 29 Lakeville PI., Jamaica Plain 

MOOERS, ELIZABETH M 97 Bovnton Ave., Plattsburg, N. Y. 

MOULTON, GRACE E River St., Norwell 

MUNRO. BERNICE E 8 Primrose St., Roslindale 

NELSON, BLANCHE A . . 30 Mellen St., Dorchester 

NICHOLS, LUCY J. (Mrs. Fred M. Earle) River Rd., Bogota, N. T. 

OELKERS. DOROTHY E 366 Goundry St., North Tonawanda. N. Y. 

PERRY, PHOSA W 241 Lafayette St., Salem 

POLSEY, MADELEINE P. . ' 71 Howland St., Roxburv 

POTTER, ELIZABETH T Sharon 

REEVES. HILDA M 23 Middlesex Ave., Reading 

RIEFKOHL, EMILY A Mannabo, Porto Rico 

ROBINSON. GLADYS S 42 Felton St., Hudson 

SCHENCK. IRENE E .130 Brandywine Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 

SCULLY. PAULINE A 83 3rd St., Manchester, N. H. 

STERN. SELMA Berlin, N. H. 

STOCKBRIDGE. HELEN W 297 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown 

STUPP. EDNA M. K 2924 Shenandoah Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

SUTPHEN, MADELINE Bernardsville. N. J. 

TABOR. MARION E 42 Park St., Haverhill 

TRICKEY, DORIS M Northwood Narrows, N. H. 

UPDEGRAFF. RUTH Vallejo, Cal. 

VAN WINKLE, WILHELMINA A. (Mrs. Allen T. Everett) The Terrace, Rutherford, N. J. 

WARFIELD, RUTH E West Brookfield 

WHITE. LOUISA 287 Highland Ave.. Providence, R. I. 

WHITNEY. MARGUERITE 137 Chestnut St., Needham 

WIGHT, GENEVA A 14 Winnemay St., Natick 

WILLIAMS, FLORENCE M 24 Cherry St., Lynn 

WORTHAM. MERLE 504 North 5th St., Temple, Texas 




93 




JUNIORS 




©Hirers 

Sylvia P. Wallace 
President 
Dorothy Blood Katharine G. McManmon 

Vice-President Secretary 

Anna K. Silver 
Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Ruth D. Gates Ruth H. Lawrence 

Alice M. Klein Harriet Leonard 

Class Color: Red 




96 



(Elass of 101 B 

NAME. HOME. 

ABBOTT, FLORENCE C Melrose 

ABBOTT. MARION 1 Fonda, N. Y. 

ABBOTT. MARTORIE I . _ Franklin 

ADAMS. DOROTHY F Boston 

ALDRICH. MARION A Boston 

ALGER. SALOME W W. Bridgeware!- 

AMES. EDITH M Quincy 

AMSDEN. RUTH M Petersham 

ANDREWS. PEARL ' Orange 

ANNABLE. DOROTHY Salem 

ARMINGTON. DOROTHY F Boston 

BABCOCK, HELEN R Jefferson, Ohio 

BAILEY, FLORENCE E Woodfords, Me. 

BAKER, GRACE A N. Attleborough 

BANCROFT. PRISCILLA Haverhill 

BECK. LUCY P Braintree 

BECKWITH. LOUISE F Stafford Springs, Conn. 

BISHOP. GLADYS S Southington, Conn. 

BLISS, MILLICENT ' Lynn 

BLOOD, DOROTHY C Newton 

BOGGS, R. LOUISE India 

BOSWORTH. HATTIE E Falls Village, Conn. 

BRADY. ELIZABETH C Sitka, Alaska 

BREWER. MARGARET E Upton 

BRIGGS. FREDA M Glens Falls, N. Y. 

BURNES. BESSIE Boston 

BYINGTON, RUTH Boston 

CAMPBELL, MARGUERITE E Ontario, Cal. 

CAUMAN, JOSEPHINE E Boston 

CLIFFORD. ELIZABETH H Newton 

COLLINS. RUTH M Lakeport, N. H. 

CONWAY, EDNA W Quincy 

CRABTREE, LEAH E Island Falls, Me. 

CRAWFORD. LILLIAN Cambridge 

CRAWLEY. ALVRTORIE Gloucester 

CROSWELL. EVELYN A Welleslev 

CURRIN, ALTHEA M Waltham 

DALAND. GENEVA A Wakefield 

DAMON. DAPHNE M Hawaii 

DAVIDSON. CORA B Ramsey, N. J. 

DAY. DOROTHY M Bellows Falls, Vt. 

DEANE. HELEN F Fall River 

DICKSON. CAROLYN M Brookline 

DIKE. ERMA M Stoneham 

DODGE. GLADYS Alton. N. H. 

DOHERTY. LOUISE L Newton 

DUBOIS. RUTH Lynn 

ELLIS. MARY F Westwood 

ELWELL. FRANCES Milford 

FIELD. BERNICE Sharon 

FISHER. ELIZABETH E Dedham 

FITZGERALD, RUTH E Melrose 

FITZGIBBONS. HELEN M Boston 

FLACK. HELEN G Lowell 

FLYNN. ANNIE M Saugus 

FORD. CHARLOTTE E Hanover. N. H. 



97 



NAME. HOME. 

FOSTER, L. HESTER Boston 

FOSTER, LAURA R Swampscott 

FREEMAN, GERTRUDE I Boston 

GALLAGHER, S. ETHEL Newton 

GAREY, ETHEL H Thetford, Vt. 

GARLAND, GLADYS L Great Pond, Me. 

GATES, LILLIAN H Machias, Me. 

GATES, RUTH D Amherst 

GAVIN, MADELINE R Boston 

GERALD, LOUISE W Canton 

GILLIES, ELIZABETH Wakefield, R. I. 

GRANDISON, BERNICE M Lynn 

GREGG, GOLDA M Austin, Minn. 

HADLEY, GLADYS J Newton 

HAMBLETT, MARY S Nashua, N. H. 

HAMILTON, DOROTHY M New Haven, Cona 

HATCH, MARY E Newton 

HAWLEY, ESTHER G Brookline 

HAYDEN, BEULA L Rutherford, N. T. 

HODGES, MILDRED E Maiden 

HOOPER, MARGUERITE Castine. Me. 

HOYT, INEZ W Franklin, N. H. 

JACOBS, E. PAULINE Boston 

JACOBS. HELEN G Boston 

TOB. FLORENCE L Newton 

JONES, DOROTHY E Buffalo, N. Y. 

JONES, DOROTHY M Catskill, N. Y. 

TONES, ELEANOR Watertown 

KEARN, ALICE J Northampton 

KENDALL. MARGARET E Concord, N. H. 

KINGSLEY. MADELEINE D S. Berwick, Me. 

KLEIN, ALICE M Boston 

KNIGHT. THELMA I Somerville 

KNIGHTLY, LORETTA A Amherst 

LAWRENCE, RHODA B Peekskill, N. Y. 

LAWRENCE, RUTH H Whitman 

LENIHAN, MARGARET P Boston 

LEONARD, HARRIET Glover, Vt 

LORRAINE, VIRGINIA L Richmond. Va. 

McCULLOCH, HELEN W Pawtucket. R. I. 

MacDONALD, J. CLAIRE Watertown 

McMANMON, KATHARINE G Lowell 

MACRAE, BLANCHE A Providence. R. I. 

MANDELSTAM. RAE Boston 

MANN, MIRIAM L Everett. Pa. 

MARSH. HAZLE H. . Somerville 

MAYO, SARAH W Bridgewater 

MERRIAM, HELEN E Springfield 

MERSEREAU, VERA L Somerville 

MESERVE, RACHEL T Boston 

MILLS, VERTA I Lynn 

MOIR. GRACE E Arlington 

MONROE, FLEANOR D Boston 

MORAN, ANNA C Milton 

MULCASTFR. ANNE M Philadelphia. Pa. 

MYRON. CLAIRE P Lynn 

NOTTINGHAM. MARGARET B Crozet, \'a. 

O'I'RIFN. MARIE G Boston 

O'CONNOR. MARGARET E Wakefield 



9S 



NAME. HOME. 

O'NEIL. GERTRUDE E. . Boston 

PAGE. SARAH C Richmond. Me. 

PAYSON. HAZEL A Stoneham 

PAYSON. RACHAEL A Quincy 

PERRY, ELEANOR W Weston 

POOLE, SYLVIA r Faribault, Minn. 

POTEAT, PRISCILLA Greenville, S. C. 

POTTER, LYDIA M Apponaug, R. I. 

POWELL, MILDRED Great Harrington 

RANDALL, MARY R Belmont 

RASER, MARGARET H Ashtabula. Ohio 

REILLY, ELINOR F Boston 

RICHARDS, RUTH Winthrop 

RIEGER, ELSIE L Reading, Pa. 

ROBERTS. RUTH E Gorham, Me. 

ROBERTSON. MARION E Worcester 

ROBINSON, GERTRUDE H ' Boston 

ROCKWOOD. MARTORIE R Hopedale 

ROWEN. MADELINE M Boston 

RUSSELL. RUTH E E. Middleburv. Vt. 

RUST. J. HESTER Manchester 

SAMPSON, E. ELIZABETH Framingham 

SANDS, GLADYS F Newton 

SAWIN, OLIVE Southborough 

SCOTT, MARIAN A Gloversville, N. Y. 

SERY1S. OLIVE E Melrose 

SHERMAN. ELIZABETH P Boston 

SILVER, ANNA K Dalton 

SMITH. ISABELLE C Moscow. Vt. 

SOROKER, SIBYL Boston 

SPENCER. ELEANOR M Boston 

STARBUCK, ISABELLA F. . Cambridge 

STORM. CECELIA A Pompton Lakes, N. T. 

STRAUSS, MARCIA M ■ Boston 

STRONG. ELEANOR M Pittsfield 

SWANTON. HELEN F Andover 

SWEETSER, ANNA M Worcester 

TALBOT. ELIZABETH A Somerville 

TANDY. MARY Vevay, Ind. 

THOMPSON. SARAH W Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 

THROSSELL. MARTORIE Lakewood. Ohio 

TIBBETTS. HELENA A. M ' . . . Boston 

TIMMFRMAN. HAZEL B Amsterdam, N. Y. 

TRAVIS. JESSIE C Lvnn 

WADSWORTH, MILDRED W. C Southborough 

WALLACE. SYLVIA P Pasadena. Cal. 

WATERBURY. HELEN N Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

WERFR. HARRIET L Madison, Wis. 

WHITE. FLORENCE H ' Waterbury. Conn. 

WHTTLOCK. HELEN I Calais. Me. 

WIENFR. GLADYS I Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

WIGG T N, MARGARET Sanbornville, N. H. 

WILLARD. GERTRUDE M Somerville 

WTLL T AMS. ESTHER L Boston 

WILSON. GERTRUDE New Bedford 

WISWALL, ELLA F Lvnn 

WOLFF. ESTELLE M New York, N. Y. 

WYANDT. HELEN Bryan, Ohio 

YESNER. SOPHIE M Boston 



99 



H (^ Ir^L <^>^ 





QDfltrpra 

Caeita Hunter 

President 
Rae Finsterwald Florence Crowell 

Vice-President Secretary 

Dorothy McKissick 
Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Mary Coburn Adelaide Mason 

Catharine Litchfield Margaret Pickles 

Class Color: Green 




102 



(UlasH of 1919 

NAME. HOME. 

ALCOTT. MARION D Everett 

ALDRICH. 1ESSIE M Cambridge 

ALLISON, ELLA C ' . . . - Boston 

ALLSTON, HENRIETTA K Saugus 

ANDERSON. MARTHA Norwich, Conn. 

AVERY, PAULINE M Laconia, N. H. 

AYES, HELEN P Portland, Me. 

BAILEY. RUTH D Wiscasset, Me. 

BAKER. DOROTHEA E Jamestown, N. Y. 

BAKER, HELEN M Kansas City, Mo. 

BAMBERG, DOROTHY C Boston 

BARISH, GERTRUDE Boston 

BARNES. RUTH L Boston 

BATCHELDER. MARION F Brookfield, Vt. 

BELT, MARY A Auburn, Me. 

BLANCHARD, HELEN W Montpelier, Vt. 

BONNEY. ETHEL Scituatc 

BRAMSON. ROSE F Worcester 

BREWSTER. ADA Andover 

BRIGGS. ESTHER B Medford 

BRIGHAM. BEATRICE M Fitchburg 

BRITTAIN. HARRIETT A Somerville 

BROWN. CHRISTINE P Poquonock, Conn. 

BUCKLEY. MARION C Boston 

BUNTIN. PRISCILLA Newton 

BUSHELL, C. GRACE Springfield 

BUTTERWORTH, JEANNE Hopedale 

CAHILL, MARTHA M Boston 

CAMPBELL. SARA E Needham 

CASTLEMAN. BLANCHE Rochester. N. Y. 

CATON. ELEANOR R Boston 

CATON. MARION L Foxborough 

CHAPMAN. RUTH Woodfords, Me. 

CHURCH. BEATRICE ' Hampton, N. H. 

CLARK. EUNICE S Newton 

CLOGSTON, GRACE M Boston 

COBURN. MARY Boston 

COHEN. REBECCA Boston 

CONROY. AGNES T Boston 

COUGHLIN. ELSIE M Boston 

COYERLY. ELEANOR Y Troy, N. Y. 

CROSS. ELEANOR E Portland, Me. 

CROWELL. FLORENCE Quincy 

DANIELS. MARGARET E ' Brookhne 

DAWLEY. LENA B Norwich, Conn. 

DF.PUGH. HELEN M Yonkers, N. Y. 

DODGE. TESSIE A Boston 

DOUTHIT. ALISON McG Petersham 

DOWNING. BERNICE B Laconia. N. H. 

DRUMMOND. HTLDEGARD V Waterville, Me. 

DUBOIS. KATHERINE R Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

DUBOIS. MARY E . - ■ ■ Lynn 

DUFF. SUSIE L Arlington 

DUNKS. ABBIE E Worcester 

DUNN. EDITH R Weston 



103 



NAME. HOME. 

DUNN, ISABEL L Exeter, N. H. 

EDDY, JOSEPHINE F Indianapolis, Ind. 

EMERY. BEATRICE A Bar Harbor, Me. 

EVERETT, IRENE ' Boston 

FAUCETT, ETHEL M Glenbrook, Conn. 

FELKER, MILDRED A Nashua, N. H. 

FINSTERWALD, RAE Detroit, Mich. 

FISHER, H. LUTHERA St. Albans, Vt. 

FISHER. MARIE E Washington, D. C. 

FITCH, MARION A : Somerville 

FLEMMING. OLIVE M Cambridge 

FOWLER. HELEN Plymouth 

FRENCH. MARION E Deep River, Conn. 

FRUMSON, RUTH G Boston 

GARDNER, MARGARET E Woodland, Me. 

GARRITY, BEATRICE E Newton 

GILMAN, ALICE I Boston 

GORDON, MILDRED E Providence, R. I. 

GRAUERT, HELEN E Rutherford, N. J. 

GRIFFIN, ALICE H Portsmouth, N. H. 

GRIMES, ELIZABETH P Nantucket 

GROSE, INEZ B Stratton, Me. 

GUPPEY, LILLIS M Salmon Falls, N. H. 

GUPPEY, RIDIE L Salmon Falls, N. H. 

HALL, KATHARINE M N. Adams 

HARRIGAN, MARY C Boston 

HEFFLON, ANNE Winchester 

HENDERSON, CAROLYN E Middleton 

HITCHCOCK, MILDRED E Medway 

HODGES, AUGUSTA R Mansfield 

HOLMES, MARGARET Kingston 

HOLMES. MARION F Rochester, N. H. 

HOLT. ELIZABETH M New Bedford 

HOUSER. ALMA M Berlin Heights, Ohio 

HOWARD, ELIZABETH Melrose 

HOWELL, MARION Stoneham 

HUNTER, CARITA B Brookline 

TOCHUM, JULIA T. . . ■ Marion, 111. 

TONES, CARRIE M Lakeport, N. H. 

KARLOWA, CAROLYN H Davenport. la. 

KAYSER, WILLA D Cincinnati, Ohio 

KELTHER, ESTHER G Boston 

KELLY, RUTH R ' Boston 

KILLELEA, GERALDINE C Leominster 

KLEIN, MARY A Boston 

KNEIL, CAROLINE M Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

KUMMER. GLADYS Cleveland, Ohio 

LADD, MOLLY L • Epping, N. H. 

LANE. BEATRICE F Lynn 

LEARY. LOUISE C Boston 

LEAVITT, ELIZABETH Chicago. 111. 

LEWIS, ELISABETH P Cambridge 

LEWIS, HELEN M Cambridge 

LINAHAN, AGNES M Brookline 

LINCOLN, ELLA M Glens Falls. N. Y. 

LIPMAN, REBECCA E Lynn 

LITCHFIELD. CATHERINE New York. N. Y. 

LOWE. MADELEINE E Boston 

LYONS. MARION G Newton 



104 



NAME. HOME. 

McCANN, MARION F Boston 

McCarthy, Gertrude m ■■ Aver 

MacCONNELL, EDITH B Boston 

McKEE. HAZEL C Haverhill 

MACK IE. DOROTHY Bradford, Pa. 

McKISSICK, DOROTHY Boston 

MacLEOD, FLORENCE L Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McNEIL. EVELYN A Stoughton 

MARBLE, GLADYS W ■ E. Bridgeware!- 

MASON. ADELAIDE F Pawlet, Vt. 

MAXWELL, BERN1CE M Melrose 

MEEHAN. MARY G Salem 

MITCHELL, RUTH Brookline 

MOORE. ALICE E Ashburnham 

MORIARTY. MARGARET E Boston 

MOSHIER, L. MARION Utica, N. Y. 

MUTH, ELEANOR E Lititz, Pa. 

NEFF, GERTRUDE Salem 

NEWELL. HARRIET ......' Tapan 

NICKERSON. PRISCILLA Foxborough 

NICOLL, FLORENCE M Boston 

O'BRIEN, ELEANOR L Williamstown 

O'BRIEN. MARGUERITE M Boston 

O'CONNOR. ALICE K Holyoke 

ORTH, CATHERINE E Steelton, Pa. 

PAINE. FRANCES W Aberdeen, Wash. 

PAINE. TANET E Warwick Neck, R. I. 

PENDLETON, JESSICA E Norwich, Conn. 

PERKINS. VERA A Rutland, Vt. 

PFUND. MARION C Boston 

PHELPS, LILLA M Lowell 

PICKLES. MARGARET L Somerville 

PIPER. MARTORIE B Milton 

POLLYCUTT. HELEN T. P Stoughton 

POULIN. FLORA M Farmington, Me. 

PRESCOTT. KATHERINE Stoneham 

QUINLAN. ROSEMARY S Natick 

RABINOVITZ, NELLIE Boston 

RAMIREZ, MARIA P Porto Rico 

REEVES. BEATRICE A Attleborough 

REYNOLDS. ALICE Canton 

RICE, ALICE E „ . .• Somerville 

RICHARDS. GLADYS L Lynnfield 

ROCK. KATHARINE H Swampscott 

ROGERS. SELMA Boston 

ROMANS. GERTRUDE Boston' 

ROUNDY, SUSAN Worcester 

ROWE. ERNESTINE Cleveland, Ohio 

RUSSELL. MARY E Exeter, N. H. 

RYAN. MARGARET M Stoughton 

SANBORN. RUTH A Cambridge 

SANDERS. A. MILDRED Cleveland, Ohio 

SAVAGE. EDITH A Boston 

SAWYER. HARRIOT B Boston 

SAWYER. MARY N Palmvra, N. Y. 

SCHONFELD. BELLE W Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

SCULLEY. MARGARET A Hamilton 

SELDEN. EVA Plainfield, N. J. 



105 



NAME. HOME. 

SEWALL. H. SYDNEY Old Town, Me. 

SEXTON, VERA A Fitchburg. 

SEYBOLT, LOIS A Portsmouth, Pa. 

SHAW, CHARLOTTE H Lancaster, Pa. 

SHAW, MARGARET M Boston 

SHELLEY, KATHERINE M Albany, N. Y. 

SHERBURNE, RUTH E Tyngsborough 

SHUTE. MARION Uxbridge 

SKINNER, THEODOSIA F - . . . . Watertown 

SMITH, MARION C Waltham 

SORIN. RUTH H Cincinnati, Ohio 

SPAMER, MARION P Oronoque, Conn. 

SPENCER, EUNICE H W. Haven, Conn. 

STACEY, HELEN R White River Junction, Vt. 

STARBUCK, KATHARINE R Lancaster 

STEVENS, RUTH M Boston 

STOLZENBACH, ANNA K . . . Sewickley. Pa. 

STONE, ESTHER M Boston 

SUGHRUE. ALICE E ■ . . Boston 

SUMMERS, GRACE B Walpole 

SVENSON, TILLY E Boston 

SWEENEY. JOSEPHINE Exeter, N. H. 

SWIFT, EDlf H E Milton 

SYLVESTER, MARGARET J Haverhill 

THOMPSON. DORENE Orange 

TOBIN, DOROTHY E Everett 

TOLTON, EDITH R Youngstown. Ohio 

TOURTELLOTTE, L. FRANCES Marlborough 

TOWLE, OLIVE E Walpole 

TYLER, CATHERINE ■ Newton 

WALDEN. VIOLA S Williamstown 

WALKER, M. ISABELLE Quincv 

WALLIS, EVELYN M Olean, N. Y. 

WALSH. ANNA L Randolph 

WARREN. OLIVE M Worcester 

WATSON. DELLA M Toledo, Ohio 

WEINBERG. FLORENCE Newton 

WELLS. RUTH C Lyn-n 

WETHERELL, GLADYS A Natick 

WHEELER. DORIS M Greenville, N. H. 

WHITE. RUTH L ' Taunton 

WHTTMORE. NELLIE P - Seal Harbor. Me. 

WILLIAMSON, EMMA M Frankfort, N. Y. 

WILSON, BETH Medwav 

WILSON. CAROLINE H New Bedford 

WILSON. MARGARET Cincinnati. Ohio 

WINCHESTER, EDITH M Webster 

WINSLOW. EDNA M Meriden, Conn. 

WOOD. ELIZARETH G Brookline 

WRIGHT. ALICE L Melrose 

WRTGHT. ALMA A D-erfield 

ZIRNGIEBEL, IESSIE E Needham 



106 




1 




(Bffiora 

Margaret Milne 

President 

Mary Fulton Ruth Wellington 

Vice-President Secretary 

Barbara Joy 

Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Isabelle Hunter Winifred St. John 

Ella Mathews Eleanor Walquist 

Class Color : Yellow 





L 




■ 









109 



aUaBB nf 19SD 

NAME. HOME. 

ALBERT, DOROTHY D Fall River 

ALDRICH, MARION R Rockford, 111. 

AMES, ADA W Montclair, N. J. 

ASH, HAZEL L Lisbon, N. H. 

BAKER, GERTRUDE G New York, N. Y. 

BANCROFT, LOUISE Haverhill 

BASHFORD, JEAN Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

BASTIAN, EMILIE M Allentown, Pa. 

BATCHELDER, RUTH E Wilton, N. H. 

BATES, MARIA W Swampscott 

BEALS, HELEN R Winnetka, 111. 

BENNER, LOUISE M Lowell 

BIRKNER, ELSA M Boston 

BLANCHARD, ELNORA R Montpelier, Vt. 

BOOTHBY, HELEN E Augusta, Me. 

BOULDING, DOROTHY C Boston 

BOYD. KATHARINE Maiden 

BRADBURY, MILDRED R Revere 

BRADY, HELEN M Marshfield 

BREED, LUELLA Boston 

BROOKS, DOROTHY L Brookline 

BRUCE, GLADYS P Boston 

BURCH, MINNABELLE V Boston 

BURNES, CHARLOTTE I Woburn 

CARPENTER, MARY C St. Johnsbury, Vt 

CARROLL, MARY H Watertown 

CASEY, MARY Quincv 

CHRISTIAN, KATHERINE F Chicago Tunction, Ohio 

CLARK, REBA M Rockland 

CLEVELAND, RUTH H Georgetown 

COGGESHALL, DOROTHY Melrose 

CONLEY, S. BEATRICE Cambridge 

COTTER, MARY C Somerville 

CREEDAN, GRACE E Hopkinton 

CROOK, LAURA K Champlain. N. Y. 

DAMON, CATHERINE V Norfolk, Va. 

DAVIS, FRIEDA Boston 

DE MINGS, RUTH A Stoneham 

DRESEL, JOHANNA E San Francisco, Cal. 

DUNFREY, HELEN A Williamstown 

DURGIN, DOROTHY Salem 

EATON, DOROTHY H Sudbury 

EATON, MARION Taunton 

ESSERY, LOUISE H Charlottetown, P. E. I. 

FARRAR, HELEN G Somerville 

FARWELL, RACHEL Natick 

FENERTY, GERALDINE M Brookline 

FLEMMING. RUTH E Lonsdale, R. I. 

FOLEY. LILLIAN G Boston 

FULTON, MARY C Somerville 

GABLER, RUTH M Holvoke 

GALLAGHER. HELENE M Hardwick, \'t. 

GEE. FLORENCE L Maiden 

GIBLIN. CONSTANCE E Boston 

GILES. RUTH E Middletown, N. Y. 

OILMAN. BEATRICE I Colebrook, Conn. 



110 



NAME. HOME. 

GLEASON, EDITH H Everett 

GOLDSTEIN, BERTHA V Hartford, Conn. 

GOODRICH, DOROTHY I Taunton 

GOODRICH. AIARTORIE AI Lee 

GORDON, HARRIETTE E Cambridge 

GORDON. MARION L Newton 

GUNN, HELEN Obcrlin, Ohio 

HALL. VERA L Concord. N. H. 

HARXED. EM1LIE B Philadelphia, Pa. 

HARRIS. VIVIAN H Deep River, Conn. 

HARRISON. RUTH Boston 

HASKINS. RUTH M Taunton 

HATTIE. AIARY S Abington 

HAYNES, BEATRICE C Boston 

HELLER. RUTH R boston 

HENDRICKS. EVA P Allentown. Pa. 

H1LDRETH, MARGARET S Melrose 

HINMAN, ALICE H N. Stratford, N. H. 

HOUSTON. JENNIE A Portland, Me. 

HUDNUT. E. KATHERINE Youngstown, Ohio 

HUNTER, ISABELLE L ■ Boston 

HURD, HARRIET M Wellesley 

HUTCHINGS, DOROTHY Holliston 

INSCHO. DOROTHY E Nichols, N. Y. 

TACOBS. ELEANOR L Utica, N. Y. 

JACOBSON. BERTHA Chelsea 

TAQUES, MILDRED N Binghamton, N. Y. 

IENKS. MARION B Franklin. N. H. 

TONES. ISABELLE Weymouth 

TONES. MARGUERITE P Sudbury 

TOY, BARBARA E Bar Plarbor, Me. 

KAAN. MARIE W Brookline 

KARRER, CHARLOTTE A Hingham 

KIMBALL. MARY A Boston 

KTNGSLEY. AIARGARET C S. Berwick, Me. 

KIRKPATRICK, AI. REGINA Holyoke 

KLING. AIILDRED E Amsterdam, N. Y. 

KOHL. DOROTHY K Melrose 

LAAIKIN. LOUISE C Athens. Pa. 

LAPP. LUCILLE AI N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

LEGATE. BESSIE AI Charlemont 

LEWIS. BLANCHE Worcester 

LEWIS. ADALINE H Yarmouth, N. S. 

LUFKIN. HELEN M Gloucester 

LURIO. ADALINE G ■ Lancaster, Pa. 

LYNN. MARION H Plainfield, N. J. 

AIcARTHUR. RUTH L Buffalo, N. Y 

McCRlLLIS. NORMA A • Rochester, N. H. 

AI, DUFFEE. RUTH A Dover, N. H. 

AIacLEAN. AIARTORIE T Arlington. N. J. 

MANNING, ANNA F Cambridge 

AIARTIN. HELEN A. A Mill Village, N. H. 

MATTHEWS, ELLA Kingston, N. Y. 

AIEYER. ESTHER C Gardner 

AIILLER. GRACE P Qumcy 

AIILNE. AIARGARET L Fall River 

AIISHEL. SYLVIA S Boston 

AIOOERS. RUTH D Milton 

AIOONEY, AIARTORIE L Medway 



111 



NAME. H0ME 

MORSE, MARIAN E Revere 

^fV/r?^ M .'.'.'.'.'::.' Watertown 

MOSS, MARY V ■ Athens Ga 

MURDOCH, MADELINE H ' ' Brockton 

MURRAY, LILLIAN M ,™ 

NICKERSON, HELEN D .' w7,« 

NOWERS, ELIZABETH ' ' ' rVxC'ron 

OAKES, HELEN R '.".'.'.'.'.['' Bos to 

O'CONNOR, MARIE F ' Cambridge 

O'NEIL, HELEN R .'.'.'.'.'.: Boston 

PAGE, CHARLOTTE P Athens P a 

PALMER, MARION O ] \ \ \ Norwich Town , Co nn.' 

PARKER, GLADYS H Hinton 

PERRY, H. MARGARET Waltham 

PETERS, CATHERINE B ' ' : Lenox 

PETERSON, MARION E ' ' ' 'r onrn i-ri 

RANDALL, MARGARET E Winchester 

REED, GLADYS '.'.'.'.'.'' Worce t« 

SfS^SM BERTHA C Putnam, Conn, 

RJLEY INEZ E E . Greenwich, R. I. 

RIPLEY, HELEN M Chelmsford 

RIVITZ, SOPHIA G .... uneimstora 

ROACH. DOROTHY S '.'.'.'.'.'.'.' Pittsford N Y 

ROBERTS, DOROTHY D " '„' ]t'J e : 

ROME, ESTHER E Gardner 

RUST, MARION S ! .' ! ." .' ." ." ." .' .' Bucksport Me 

ST. JOHN, WINIFRED K Ham n NY 

SANBORN, JESSIE B Hamilton 

SCHWARTZ, HARRIETTS F Roston 

SCOTT, MARION F ... . . » on 

SCULLEY, MARY E '. '. ' ' Hamilton 

SCULLY, RUTH Arhni on 

SEIPLE, ELIZABETH .'.'.'.'.'.'.'. ' New ' Brighton & Pa 

^ri7r R °^Jr-^ 1LY jTmestown? N. Y 

SEWALL, NANCY R Island Falls Me 

SEYBOLT RUTH A Portsmouth," N.R 

SHARF, FRANCES Boston 

SHAW, ELIZABETH M '.'.'.'.".'.'.".'. Houlton Me 

SHEFFIELD, MARY M Newport R I 

SHUTE, ADELIA R Woodsvi lie N H 

SKOLFIELD, ELIZABETH G Brunswick Me 

SPAULDING, LOIS J. E .... u ™™™! «* 

SPRAGUE, MARJORIE E Lvnn 

STEARNS, HELEN ... ^y i ■ 

STOW, HELEN E .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'"' Winsted Con 

STUBBS, JEANNETTE B Wihm on D 

SWAIN, ELIZABETH Methuen 

TEAGUE, SALLY W \ Pea loch 

THOMAS, MARTHA A ". '. '. ". '. ' Gloucester 

THORNTON, DOROTHY L ~ Bost " 

TIEDEMANN, MARIE '.'.'.'.'.'.'. Bound Brook N T 

TOWNSEND, GLADYS E Ie Rov N Y 

TUTTLE, EDITHA H '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.. Toledo Ohio 

VAN WART, RUTH M Cherrvnel 1 Me 

vov KOLNITZ. HELEN Charleston ,S C 

WADE, MARGARET Charleston , b^C. 

WALQUIST, ELEANOR K. E ■ • • 

WANZER, EVA G En 

WARNER, BERN1CE '.'.'.'.'.'.'. Whe'aton 111. 



112 



NAME. HOME. 

WARREN, HELEN L Leicester 

WASGATT. MARGARET C Bar Harbor. Me. 

WEBB. ANNIE F Kennebunk, Me. 

WEBBER. MARY E Lvnn 

WEISS. GERTRUDE S Maiden 

W ELLINGTON. RUTH Newton 

WIDGER. BARBARA Swampscott 

WILBUR. AGNES M Boston 

WILLARD. KATHARINE L Lancaster 

WOOD. HARRIET A Chatham, N. Y. 

WOODWARD. DOROTHY B Boston 

WORCESTER. TRYPHOSA R Manchester, N. H. 

WURTZBACH. HELEN M Lee 

YAFFEE. ROSE Boston 

YOURDON. CHARLOTTE I Little Falls, N. Y. 



~r~; ■:■■-. . 




113 




(iffim-a 

Katherine Hackney 

President 

Margaret Greer Marion Crosby 

Vice-President Secretary 

Marion Bowler 

Treasurer 




117 



K CS IF^ , <Q>^ 




College GkaoitateH 

NAME. HOME. 

ARNOLD, MARJORIE Haverhill 

AYER. ELIZABETH Boston 

BARUS, DEBORAH H * . Providence, R. I. 

BEDLOW, ELINOR I Dallas, Texas 

BEEBE. KATHERINE M Boston 

BOLTON, LORA E ' Geneva, Neh. 

BOWLER, MARION W. . . , Dedham 

BOWMAN, VIVIAN B Whitman 

BRADFORD, RUTH Boxford 

BURNHAM, ALICE E Norton 

CHURCH. CLEORA K : . South Hadlev 

CLARK, GRACE D Ware 

COLE, MARY R Salem 

COWLES, KATHARINE C Amherst 

COX, EMELINE B Brookline 

CRAIG, FRANCES Sioux City, Iowa 

CROSBY, MARION J - Methuen 

DAVIS, DOROTHY H Danbury, Conn. 

DAVIS, ELEANOR S Worcester 

DeRHODES, HAZEL M South Bend. Ind. 

DOWNES, ELIZABETH S Winthrop 

DRAKE, GENEVIEVE F Yellow Springs, Ohio 

DUGGAN, MARY E Hartford, Conn. 

ELLIOTT, MARGARET K Boston 

EVARTS. CHRISTINE E Somerville 

FERGUSON, EULA G Boston 

FLICK, DORIS L Dayton, Ohio 

GAVILLER, E. BARBARA Buffalo. N. Y. 

GREENE, KATHARINE E Boston 

GREER. MARGARET R Minneapolis, Minn. 

HACKNEY, KATHARINE Johnstown, N. Y. 

HAGUE. HILDA L Kingston, Ont. 

HANCHETT, HAZEL ■ Lowell 

HARRISON, HELEN Minneapolis. Minn. 

HAVEY, MARION L Boston 

HIGGINS, DOROTHY I Boston 

HOLMES, MILDRED Eastport, Me. 

HORNE, ELEANOR T Framingham 

HOUGHTON, ISABEL Brookline 

HYDE. GLADYS W Bangor. Me. 

INGERSOLL, ELIZABETH L Hamburg. N. J. 

TONES. HF.LFN Chillicothe. Ohio 

TONES. TOSIE C Valdosta, Ga. 

KILBOURN, KATHARINE Shoshone, Idaho 

KILBOURN, CLARA Shoshone. Idaho 

KLINE. STELLA M Anoka. Minn. 

KRONACHER. REGINE T Cincinnati. Ohio 

KUGLER. HESTER C Bourne 

LACEY, ELISABETH V Cheyenne, Wyo. 

LACEY, LOUISE F Cheyenne, Wyo. 

LEWIS. IRMA B Altoona, Pa. 

LOCKE. GLADYS E Boston 

MACNICOL. LAURA E. S Cuba 

MARBLE. HELEN C Worcester 

MOYER. VERA L Chicago. II!. 

MUSSER, HAZEL Delta. Colo. 



118 



NAME. HOME. 

NEWTON, MARIORIE S. U Montreal, Que. 

OTTO, MARGARETHA E Marietta, Ohio 

OWENS, BEATRICE Cleveland, Ohio 

PALMER. LAURA M Boston 

PEARSON. ABBY B Long Beach, Cal. 

PERRY, RUTH W Belmont 

PFEIFFER. MARY G Denver, Colo. 

PIGEON. HELEN D Boston 

POST, MILDRED New Orleans, La. 

POWELL, ETHEL L Boston 

PUTNAM, M. LUCILLE Cambridge 

QUESTROM. THETIS G Newburyport 

RICHARDSON. BERNICE L Leominster 

RICHARDSON. HELEN C Watertown 

ROBBINS, MARIAN Manchester, N. H. 

ROBSON. H. ELEANOR Galesburg, 111. 

ROWNTREE. TESSY E Burlington, Wis. 

SEYMOUR. ALMA B Elgin, Neb. 

SHEFFIELD. MARGARET B Newport, R. I. 

SHEPARDSOX. MARGARET Hamilton, N. Y. 

STEVENS. RUTH H Newton 

TALBOTT. OLIVIA L Danville, Va. 

THAYER. DOROTHY G Portsmouth, N. H. 

WALTERS. HELEN M Wyoming, 111. 

WARREN. HELEN Swampscott 

WARRICK. RUTH E Meadow Grove, Neb. 

WEST, ALICE M Newton 

WHITNEY. EMILY Winchendon 

WILSON. MARIE M Boston 

WOODBURY. EDNA C Somerville 

ZEPFLER. ELIZABETH Needham 




119 



Ittrlaaatfafr &tubmtB 

i 

The following list includes students admitted under special conditions to pursue 

prescribed programmes. 

NA ME. HOME. 

APPELT, IDA B Webster 

BAKER, HELEN L • ■ • -. 

BARTNETT, HOPE .' New York N. Y 

BATCHELLER, HELEN U N Brookfield 

CAINE, MARY F. A Clinton 

CAMPBELL, L. ELIZABETH ' Boston 

CLARK, CONSTANCE H '. Alhambra, Cal. 

CLIFFORD, MERCIE L Avon 

CONNOR, M. ELIZABETH Cambridge 

DAVIS, MARGARET L . Gloucester 

DERMAN, HENRIETTE M Russia 

ELLIOTT, ESTHER J Newton 

FISK, PAULINE Brattleboro, Vt. 

FRANZ, GERTRUDE Holyoke 

FREEMAN, THELMA Detroit Mich 

GILES, EDA M Vancouver, B. C. 

HALL, EDNA A Moorestown, N. J. 

HODGKINS, HELEN Boston 

HORNE, VIOLA M Milton 

JACKSON, MARY E Boston 

JONES, VIVIAN O Nashua, N. H. 

KELLY, JANE V Savannah. Ga. 

KILEY, ETHEL F Medford 

K1LLEN, DORA E Braddock, Pa. 

KIMBALL, BERTHA G Alfred Me 

LANE, HELEN L. . Cambridge 

LENNIHAN, TRESSA Westwood 

MITCHELL, ELIZABETH D Portland Me 

MOORE, DORRIS Beverlv 

MOORE, RUTH Saco Me 

MOSHER, CAROLYN E Binghamton, N. Y. 

MUNGER, L. IRENE Herkimer. N. Y. 

NELLIS, A. MARGARET Boston 

NEWELL, MILDRED F Holden 

NICKERSON. SARAH K Yarmouth 

NOTT. ELIZABETH Newton 

OLDEN, E. WINIFRED Princeton N T 

PALMER, LAURA W Stonington, Conn. 

PARKER, ELIZABETH M Weston 

PHILLIPS, RUTH A Hornell. N. Y. 

QUIMBY, ALICE H Manchester 

ROAT. EDITH L Kingston, Pa. 

SHARP, JEANNETTE M Indianapolis. Ind. 

SHEARSTON, ALICE D Miami, Fla. 

SLEEP, D. ELIZABETH Wolfville. N. S. 

SLEEPER, RUTH Manchester, N. H. 

SMITH. ALICE L Lodi, X. Y. 

SMITH. IDA Petrolia. Out. 

SMITH, LEORA N Palmer 

STEMLER, LOUISE A Boston 

TAYLOR. OLIVE E Moorestown, N. I. 

WEDDIGKN. IRENE G . Auburn N Y 

WITHINGTON, MARGARET Boston 



120 



It 

The following list includes students admitted to pursue irregular or partial programmes. 
NAME. HOME. 

ALLEN, EUNICE D., A.B ' . Cambridge 

RAIN. GLADYS L., A.B r" Quincy 

BAKER, ELEANOR T Newton 

BANKS, FRANCES B„ S.B Barrington Passage, N. S. 

BARBER. EMILY E., A.B Painesville, Ohio 

BARNICOAT. CORA C Quincy 

BERNARD, IEAN, S.B Evansville, Ind. 

BRADLEY, FLORENCE A Duluth, Minn. 

BROWNELL, MARY G., A.B Providence, R. I. 

BRYANT, TOSEPHINE E., A.B E. Hartford, Conn. 

BURNHAM. CAROLYN A ' . . Cambridge 

BUTLER, ALLIE E Evansville, Ind. 

CAMPBELL, BETSY A., A.B Toledo, Ohio 

CATLETT, MARGARET Clarksville, Tenn. 

CHAPIN. RUTH Newton 

CHURCHILL, HARRIOTT P Providence, R. I. 

COBB, BEATRICE Milton 

COLSON. HELEN D. F Lawrence 

CONNOR, OLIVIA M., A.B Charleston, S. C. 

CRARY. IOSEPHINE S.. A.B Minneapolis, Minn. 

CROASDALE. DOROTHY, A.B Denver. Colo. 

CROCKETT, EVA E Boston 

CROWLEY, MARIE J Boston 

CURTIS, HELEN M Seattle, Wash. 

DALLET, MILDRED E Toledo. Ohio 

DANA, GERTRUDE Boston 

deCOU, AGNES B., A.B Moorestown, N. J. 

DODD, MARGARET, A.B Cambridge 

EDWARDS, LUCINDA S Boston 

ELIOT, ELISABETH Cambridge 

ELLIS, FANNY S Summerside, P. E. I. 

ERNST. GERTRUDE S Newton 

EVERTS. CHRISTINE, A.B Boston 

FEIGE, LAURA, A.B Ann Arbor. Mich. 

FERNALD, HELEN L., A.B Belmont 

FLAA, GURINE L Davis, Cal. 

FOSTER, HELEN B„ S.B Swampscott 

FRANZ, LOUISE M Milwaukee, Wis. 

FREEMAN, FAUSTINA. A.B Provincetown 

GARVER, LYDIA B.. A.B Strasburg, Ohio 

GORMAN, DOROTHY M Worcester 

GRIFFIN, GRACE G., A.B - Seattle, Wash. 

GRIMES. LENA E ■ Somerville 

GUTTENTAG, TESSIE Boston 

GUTTERSON. HILDEGARDE Winchester 

HARTER, LAURA V Peru, Ind. 

HELMAN, ELIZABETH E Boston 

HENNIG. RUTH M. E Boston 

HICKMAN, MILDRED M., A.B Nelsonville, Ohio 

HICKS. ISABEL, A.B Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOLLIES. ROSE E. . Brooklyn. N. Y. 

HOPKINS, ELIZABETH S Dixondale, Va. 

HUNTER, AGATHA F Arlington 

HUSTON, LOUISE K Indianapolis, Ind. 

JACKSON, MARY D Southborough 



121 



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NAME. HOME. 

KELLY, JULIA C Boston 

KENDALL, DEAN, PH.B ' Indianapolis, Ind. 

KISSEL, FLORENCE, A.B Lima, Ohio 

KJELLSTROM. INEZ, LL.B Boston 

KURTZ, EDITH R„ A.B Los Angeles, Cal. 

LEWIS, RACHEL, A.B Boston 

McAFEE, FLORENCE E Cambridge 

McINTYRE, LOIS L Minneapolis, Minn. 

MATSOUKI, MARIANTHI : Greece 

METCALF. CORNELIA S., A.B Providence, R. I. 

MOORE, FLORENCE G Los Angeles, Cal 

NANGLE, RUTH, A.B 'Brookline 

NORTON, HELEN F Norwood 

PATTEN, GRACE E., A.B Stoneham 

PERISTIANO, EMILIE Greece 

PERKINS, FLORENCE A Newburyport 

POTTER. RUTH S Providence, R. I. 

PRESSENTIN, MARIE L, A.B Madison, Wis 

PROIOUS, ARYERO Greece 

RAZI, ADELA Greece 

REED, ELIZABETH W Quincy 

ROBINSON. CATHARINE H., A.B Nantucket 

ROENKE, WILHELMINA, A.B Geneva, N. Y. 

ROGOLSKY, FREDA Boston 

SDRIN. HELEN N Greece 

SIMONDS. MARGARET . •. Bedford 

SMALL, ELLEN M Riverton, N. H. 

SPEER, HELEN M. • Somerville. N. T. 

SPRENKLE, EMMA ' Baltimore. Md. 

SOUIRES, MARY W Richmond, Vt. 

STEINMANN, ELMA Berkeley, Cal. 

STEVENS. MARGARET Boston 

STONE, ELEANOR W Brookline 

SULLIVAN, AUGUSTA M., A.B Lawrence 

SZOLD, ESTHER Peoria, 111. 

TIBBALS, MILDRED M., A.M Salt Lake City, Utah 

TRUBY. GLADYS F Kingston, Ohio 

TURNER, LYLE W„ A.B E. Woodstock, Conn. 

VAN WAGENER, BLANCHE Oxford, Mich. 

WARD, LILLIAN T Brockton 

WEEKS, ELEANOR A Belmont 

WESTERVELT, MARGARET, A.B Long Beach. Cal. 

WESTWOOD, LAURA I Melrose 

WHEELER, ALICE M.. S.B Waltham 

WHITE. HILDA C Marshfield 

WHITNEY, LOUISE. A.B Lexington 

WILLIAMS. ELEANOR W Brooklin • 

WYMAN, MATTIE K, D.D.S Seattle, Wash. 




122 




CLASS BABY 
Florence Hardy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chester S. Hardy. (Priscilla Covell. Ex., '17.) 




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<5it? ^iutottt <gaumtm?ut Association 

This year completes the second year of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation as reorganized in 191^ to include every girl in college. The asso- 
ciation aims to organize and unite the interests of all the eleven hundred 
students in college, and to further all matters of college life that are in the 
hands of the students. 

The association has this year established a Voucher Board to supervise 
the academic standing as well as the number of points accredited to all 
girls holding office; it has also incorporated a Press Board to organize and 
control all material reported to the Boston newspapers. A new Treasur- 
er's system has been established centralizing the financial affairs of all the 
student organizations under the supervision of the Student Government 
Treasurer. 

The association has done Red Cross surgical dressings work at the 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, and in addition to this, the State Clubs have 
done knitting and sewing. During the Red Cross movement throughout 
the country a campaign was conducted at Simmons for membership in the 
National Red Cross Association. It was most successful, according to 
the report of the Boston Branch of the National Society. The students 
in charge of the campaign were afterward organized into a Public Health 
Committee and have done very good work in that field. A Forum meet- 
ing was held early in March in which the Faculty and the students came 
together and were given an opportunity for free discussion on topics of 
interest in the college world. 

The association at every turn has worked as well as hoped for a Stu- 
dents' Building, for which every student in college finds such an enormous 
need. 




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Sarah Thompson, Vice-President 
Rae Fixsi.i.hu. m.i). Treasurer Sahaii Page, Secretary 

Mary Pollard, J 'resident 



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©lit Sormttoy (&aumtm?nt Assoriattmt 

Mary Pollard, President 
Sarah Thompson, J'iee-Presiden! 
Sarah Page, Secretary 
Rae Finslerwald, Treasurer 

One of the most important problems which the Dormitory Govern- 
ment Association has had to meet is the coordination of the main dormi- 
tories and the affiliated houses. This year quite an advance has been made 
with the inauguration of the Senior house chairmen. A Senior was placed 
in charge of a Freshman house, representing that house on the Dormitory 
Council at its meetings which have been made as regular as possible for 
this year. During the first days of college the Seniors actually lived at 
the houses with the new girls, and since that time they have made regular 
visits to keep in touch with their needs. 

A new system of slips for light-cuts has been tried out this year; every 
girl who wants to keep her light on after 10.30 procures the slip in advance 
from the floor proctor, and so a complete register of all lights is made 
possible. In order to assist the proctors in their work and to make the 
proctor rules as unified as possible, every six weeks a conference has been 
held and the new proctors have had a chance to ask questions and to dis- 
cuss the general problems. The thing which the association has been striv- 
ing to reach is the individual realization for each girl of the measure in 
which her conduct affects every other girl. That is the only sure basis 
for the development of the best student government in the dormitories. 




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(Mi? iramattr Assnriattmt 

Louise Giblin, President 
Louise Beck with, Wee-President 
Margaret Daxiels, Secretary 
Anna K. Stolzenbach, Treasurer 
Sarah C. Page. 

Chairman of the Dramatic Committee 

With what maternal love do we guide and guard the growth ot a 
beautiful plant! It is with just such love and interest that we watch the 
gradual and graceful development of our Dramatic Association here at 
Simmons. With what pleasure do we see the sturdy sprouts strengthen 
and grow, and the ever increasing buds show themselves ! So we feel of 
the present talent we have and of the constantly appearing new artists. 
What beauty there is in this healthy and gradual growth! Beauty in the 
sense of lasting value ! How many of us appreciate the value we derive 
from facing an audience in governing self-consciousness and in controlling 
our self expression. 

We do not expect much from an infant. How pleased we are, then, 
when our youthful club celebrates its first anniversary with an ever increasing 
interest and membership, and with bright hopes for the realization of 
great things in the future. 



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Mary McLoughlin, '17, Editor-in-Chief 

Mildred Morton, '17. Business Manager 

Winifred George, '17. Advertising Business Manager 

Lillian Graham, Art Editor 



Mabel Thompson, 
Marion Craig, '17 
Jessie McMullin, 
Hleanore Keith, 
Ruth Corwin, '17 
Marion Scott, '18 



Student Editors 
'17 



Sarah Page, '18 
Madeleine Kingsley, 
'17 Eleanor Strong, '18 

17 Harriot Sawyer, '19 

Eunice Clark. '19 
Marion Scott, '20 



18 



The MiCROCOSiM Board is responsible for the publication of this book 
and is ever ready to bear much censure or much praise, if such be inad- 
vertently given, for its efforts. A lack of time is our only excuse for all 
shortcomings. 

We take this opportunity of thanking all who have kindly assisted 
us, and especially Dr. Farley, our faculty adviser, for his interest and 
labors. 




133 



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Isabel F. Starbuck, Editor-in-Chief 
Alma M b.vrni, Business Manager 



Freda M. Briggs 
Mary Coburn 
Mary E. Hatch 



Student Editors 
Ruth H. Lawrence 
Catherine Litchfield 
Mary F. Parker 



[•Catherine H. Rock 
Adele R. Shohan 
Helen Merriam 



Persimmons is intended as a means by which any literary ability in 
the student body may find its way to the light, and also as a record of the 
various activities of the undergraduates and the Alumnae during the year. 
There have been a few changes from last year in the conduct of the maga- 
zine. In the fall the board of editors decided to depart from the custom 
of issuing monthly numbers which had been followed during the two pre- 
vious years of Persimmons' existence, and to concentrate their efforts on 
five numbers for the entire year. An attempt has been made to vary the 
type of material by printing some of the best of the theses written for the 
department of History. The editors have also tried to make the Alumnae 
Department a more significant feature of the magazine than in previous 
years. 

Our exchange list now includes Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, Vassar, Rad- 
cliffe, Barnard, and some of the western colleges. 

What Persimmons, like any college publication, most needs and hopes 
to deserve is the interest of the whole college. The editors are trying to 
make the magazine represent what is most worth while in the life of the 
college, and they ask the help of every student in carrying out their aim. 




135 



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.ffl. A. 



Frances Dittmer, President 
Rachel Meserve, Vice-President 
Friscilla Bancroft, Secretary 

The fifth year of the Young Women's Christian Association is proving 
to be most successful. Our activities this year have expanded in several 
directions. The most important feature of the Y.W.C.A. is the regular 
Tuesday afternoon meeting held in Students' Room. Here we forget for 
a few moments the speed which we have just acquired in typewriting, or 
the luncheon we have with much trepidation served to a few favored mem- 
bers of the faculty, and think of the meaning of life as a whole, what place 
we are going to take in it, and how we can consecrate our lives so that 
people may say of us, "For their sakes she sanctified herself." 

In the Fall a most enjoyable and profitable day was spent at Milton at 
a conference of all the student Y.W.C.A. bodies in Greater Boston. The 
Cabinet went directly from the conference to Scituate for a house-party, 
the memories of which will endure until superseded by those of the house- 
party given the old and new Cabinet members in the Spring. Our Christ- 
mas meeting took the form of a presentation of "The Nativity Play" and 
was enjoyed by a large audience. 

Bibie classes have been held the first term and Mission Study classes 
the second. A great deal of missionary interest has sprung up this past 
year which has resulted in the formation of the first Student Volunteer 
Band of Simmons. A rally is to be held and we are hoping to raise money 
enough to support Miss Mary Baker, who will be the Simmons represent- 
ative in China. 

A new idea has been carried out this year most successfully. We 
issued in a very attractive and convenient form Freshman booklets con- 
taining information about the various extra-curriculum activities of the 
college. Our aim to increase the Christ-spirit among the student body is 
foremost, and, while we have many activities, they are all subjugated to 
that one purpose. 






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The presidents of the state clubs are: 



Frances Bradley, Connecticut 
Arbv Partridge, Maine 
Ethel Dole, New Hampshire 
Ruth Corwin, Neiv Jersey 



aIarjorie Eastman, New York 
Margaretta Spooner, Pennsylvania 
Elisabeth Miller, Ohio 
Carita Hunter, Simmons-Somervillc 



Evelyn Emerson, I'ennont 



These clubs were organized originally for distinctly social purposes, 
and with a view of bringing together into closer relationship the members 
of different States. Through the informal social affairs which are held, 
teas, picnics, and other jollifications, the girls from distant places are 
united. Especially valuable to the Freshmen are these gatherings where 
they become acquainted with upper classmen with whom they have some- 
thing in common; thus they get the "homey" feeling which is very apt to 
be lacking during the early part of one's college days. The members cf 
the clubs combine pleasure and duty very happily, for as they sit and chal 
merrily, they ply needles industriously for the Red Cross organization. 
All in all, the organizations form a very important element in our college 
life. 




139 



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Margaret Riegel, 
Adele Shohan 
Beatrice Brown 
a x x e mul c a ster 
Rachel Meserve 
Marion Lyoxs 



Chairman 
Catherine Tyler 
Katharine Boyd 
Charlotte Burnes 
Eleanor Bedloe 
Cleora Church 



The Social and Civic Club is endeavoring this year to carry out its 
initial purpose of presenting to the students social and political questions 
of importance, especially questions concerning this country. Even if all 
of us cannot take an active part in the work of the community, we have an 
interest in this work and must be informed in preparation for the time when 
we can and ought to take active part. 

At the first meeting in the Fall, just before the presidential election, 
Dr. Varrell of the History Department outlined the political situation and 
told how the candidates stood on various measures of public interest. 

This talk was followed by a political rally of the students in which 
the party followers and candidates formed a procession and marched around 
the athletic field. Mary Pollard represented Hughes; Cordelia Potter, 
Wilson ; Adele Shohan, Benson ; and Sally Page, Roosevelt. The candi- 
dates and their intimate friends rode in the cars of several of the faculty 
who were interested, and each candidate made a speech declaring his 
policy. Party bands led the procession, and large crowds of onlookers 
cheered and added to the excitement. 

At our next meeting Dr. Frankwood E. Williams, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene, gave a very inter- 
esting talk on the treatment of the feeble-minded. Later in the term Mr. 
Laidler, the editor of the Intercollegiate Socialist, spoke to us convincingly 
on the cooperative system in industry and distribution as a remedy for the 
high cost of living, and illustrated with cases where the system has been 
successfully used. 

The main drawback of the meetings has been lack of time for questions 
and discussion after the speeches. It is forums of that sort that prove 
of most value, and such a provision for discussion is something to be 
looked forward to and worked for in the future. 



141 






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lEndommnti iFittti) (Eottratttttt 

Marjorie Eastman, Chairman 

\\ ixifred George Harriet Sawyer 

Lillian Graham Ruth Mitchell 

Mary Tandy Helen Lufkin 

Louise Beckwith Emily Harned 

M \rgaret O'Connor Helen Nickerson 
Helen Stacy 

Four years ago the college graduates then at Simmons gave a play, 
the proceeds of which were set aside as the beginning of a Student En- 
dowment Fund. This sum has been increased at various times by con- 
tributions from the students. The Endowment Fund Committee, consist- 
ing of three members from each of the four classes, receives all contribu- 
tions, plans new ways of increasing the fund, and takes the initiative in 
carrying out these plans, being aided by the loyal support of the student 
body. This year money has been received through the payment of sum- 
mer pledges, the sale of Christmas cards and Japanese prints, the sale of 
second-hand books, and a Christmas Fair. Gifts were very generously 
bestowed by the members of the faculty, of the college council, and of 
Alumnae associations throughout the country. From a financial point of 
view the Fair was a tremendous success. 




143 



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A. Shohan 



J. Cauman 
Etta Sadow, President 



R. Mandelstam 



144 



®itr IHntorab ^nrtrtg 

This year a branch of the Menorah Society has been organized in 
Simmons College. The first Menorah Society was started at Harvard 
College sixteen years ago by a number of students who felt the necessity and 
desire for such a society. It proved very helpful to all connected with 
it, and soon, in colleges all over the country, similar societies sprang up. 
This year, to the great satisfaction of many, a Menorah Society has been 
organized at Simmons. 

The aim and purpose of this Society is the study of Jewish history and 
ideals. Its object is to help all interested to understand clearly and to 
discuss intelligently the Jew's great problem — his position and standing in 
his modern environment. 

The Society is absolutely academic. It is not a religious association. 
It is fundamentally non-sectarian. By means of lectures by well-known 
speakers, study circles, and individual reading, it tends to broaden and 
educate one in a new field of thought. Everyone is invited and urged to 
join whether she has Jewish affiliations or not. The Menorah meets the 
second Tuesday of every month at four-twenty. There are speakers at 
every meeting. The membership is now twenty-four but will, we expect, 
increase rapidly. Are you interested? 




145 



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Each year there is held at Silver Bay on Lake George the Eastern 
Student Conference of the Y.W.C.A. The conference comes in June and 
lasts for ten days. Delegates come from the various eastern girls' colleges, 
the number allowed each college being in proportion to the number of stu- 
dents in that college. There are between six hundred and seven hundred 
girls at the conference each June, and this fact alone will give some idea 
of the wonderful time to be had there amid the beautiful scenery. The 
natural question as to how the six hundred girls occupy their time brings the 
answer that these ten days are fundamentally different from the rest of 
the year. During the mornings you attend classes although attendance is 
not required. The leaders of these classes are men foremost in religious 
thought in the country. In the afternoons there are all kinds of sports, 
water and land; and in the evening comes the college singing, vespers and 
delegation meeting. In brief, life at Silver Bay is a joyous and sane com- 
bination of work, play and thought. You learn through mixing with girls 
of other colleges how high is the ranking of your own college, you learn 
how others have solved their problems of student government, and you gain 
in a hundred ways in college clear-sightedness. 

Last year Simmons had twenty-five delegates to Silver Bay. Many of 
these were sent by the classes and various student organizations. So deep 
was the impression which the conference made upon the delegates that they 
considered how best they could take back to college the ideals and inspira- 
tions they had received. Of all the plans proposed the one of forming a 
Silver Bay Club seemed the most practical. This club was to help keep up 
the close friendship formed during the conference, and to arouse interest in 
Silver Bay among the students, and to send a delegate to the next confer- 
ence. In what measure the club has accomplished its first purpose the mem- 
bers themselves know ; the second will be shown perhaps in the next dele- 
gation. The third purpose is well on the way to success now. To each 
girl in Simmons the experience of Silver Bay means the deepening and 
enriching of her whole college life. 



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147 




SILVER BAY 



Musical Aasoriattrnt 

President, LUCY H. NASH, '17 
Secretary and Treasurer, Helen H. Gillette, '17 

Mandolin Club Glee Club 

Leader, Phyllis Lapham, "17 Leader, Louise D. Beckwith, '18 
Manager, GLADYS J. HADLEY, '18 Manager, MARGARET L. GLADWIN, '17 

Orchestra Ukulele Club 

Leader, Katherixe Kimball, '17 Leader, Else Claussen, '17 

The Musical Association is composed of the Choir, the Glee Club, 
the Mandolin Club, the Orchestra, and, last but not least, the Ukalele Club. 

The Choir consists of eighty members and these girls rehearse every 
Wednesday afternoon after Chapel, so that they may help with special 
music for the regular Chapel service. They also sing at Christmas vespers 
and at Commencement. 

Under its new and enthusiastic leader, Louise Beckwith, the Glee Club 
has progressed wonderfully. There are now fifty members who rehearse 
on Wednesday afternoons, and on Friday mornings. In March the Glee 
Club gave a banquet to Miss Daniels, their director, to try to show her a 
little of their appreciation for her great help. 

The number of applicants to the mandolin club was so large this year 
as to be almost unmanageable ; so Miss Katherine Kimball has started an 
orchestra. There are thirteen pieces playing in it, and they have done so 
well that they will play at all the concerts. A Ukalele Club has also been 
started under the auspices of the Mandolin Club. All the new enterprises 
show how thriving and enthusiastic our Mandolin Club is. 

The Musical Association gives two concerts in February, and one in 
June as part of the Commencement exercises. These concerts are always 
splendidlv supported by the college. This year the Association is hoping 
to start a fund for a Students' Building with the proceeds from these 
concerts. 



151 



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(Slrr anft ilattftnlut (Elnbs 

Friday and Saturday Evenings, February, 19 17 

PROGRAM 

Mandolin Club 

Glee Club 



A live Wire 
Gavotte: Amaryllis 



1 ohnstone-0 dell 



3. (a) Kleine Symphonie 
(b) Abendlied 

Orchestra 

4. (a) My True Love Hath My Heart 
(b) The Little Gray Dove 

Solo, Miss Marion Morse 

Misses Alger, Hefflon, Morse, Nash, Stevens, 
Bailey, Ripley, Beckwith and Mersereau 

5. Selections 

Ukaleles, Mandolins, Banjo and Guitar 

6. (a) Song of the Persian Captive 
(b) The Alphabet 

Glee Clltb 

7. Solo (a) Impatience 

(b) The Almond Tree 

(c) Nymphs and Fauns 

Miss Marjorie Soper 

8. (a) Romancia \ 
(b) The Wind-Up S 

Mandolin Club 

9. (a) Serenade 

Solo, by Miss Scully 

(b) Grinds: I. The History of 19 17 
2. College Medley 
10. Alma Mater 

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL 

O beautiful for spacious skies. 

For amber waves of grain. 
For purple mountain majesties, 

Above the fruited plain ! 
America ! America ! 

God shed his grace on thee, 
And crown thy good with brotherhood 

From sea to shining sea ! 



Eschman 

Schumann 

Old English 

Soar 



Daniels 
Mozart 

Schubert 
S chum an 
Bemberg 

Odell 

Gabriel Marie 



153 



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ATHLETICS 




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Atiilrtira 

OiRisTiyK Rickkr, President 
Louise Beckwith. Vice-President 
Ruth Sanborn, Secretary 
Kith Mitchell, Treasurer 

From September until the 12th of December, hockey was the game 
that engrossed our whole attention. Every one who knew how to play 
participated, and those who had never played before came out and learned. 

Tennis singles which are usually played off in October were postponed 
until Spring, as quarantine had interfered badly with athletics as well as 
everything else. 

This year more than ever the association has tried to make each girl 
in college feel her responsibility, either in coming out for games herself, 
or as a loyal supporter of the others. 



:x> 



i>immmts Atlrlrttr Aaanrtattmt Prpstfonts 

191 1 Caroline E. Aldrich 

1912 Caroline E. Aldrich 

19 13 Marion Donaldson 

1 9 14 Lillian Nisbet 

1 9 1 5 Harriet Putnam 

1 91 6 Marjorie Yates 

19 1 7 Christine Ricker 



oc: 



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Mary Parker, 191 7 
Eva Leland, 1917 
Jessie McMullin, 1917 
Elinor Reilly, 19 18 
Carrie Jones, 1919 
Della Watson, 1919 
Anne Stolzenbach, 191c 



157 



Tennis Counts 



(©rgatttHpd ^>pnrta 



First Place, five points, won by 191 9. 

Second Place, three points, won by 191 8. 
Basketball Counts 

First place, five points, won by 19 16. 

Second place, three points, won by 19 17. 
Field Day 

First place, five points, won by 19 16. 

Second place, three points, won by 19 17. 

Third place, one point, won by 191 9. 
Tennis Doubles 

First place, five points, won by 19 19. 

Second place, three points, won by 19 16. 

Results: 1916 — 13 points 

1 9 1 7 — 6 points 

191 8 — 3 points 
1 919 — 1 1 points 

Organized Sports Cup, presented by the Alumnae Association, was 
won by 1916. 

<ZX.=XZZXZOO 

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The Athletic Association awarded a cup to the class who won in the 
competition for the best College Song sung at the meet. One judge was 
chosen by each class, and the Dean represented the Athletic Association. 
The cup was won by 191 6. 

The Individual Track Cup was won by G. Hussey, 19 16, 14 points. 

Class Track Cup was awarded to 1916 for the highest number of 
points. 




158 



iaskrtbaU 1915-1916 

The series of interclass basketball games for 191 5- 191 6: 



Senior- Junior 


47- 


-30 


Junior- Freshman 


3i- 


-26 


Freshman-Sophomore 


24- 


-23 


Senior-Freshman 


58- 


-18 


Junior-Sophomore 


3 1 " 


-28 


Senior-Sophomore 


40- 


-39 


Senior-Junior 


58- 


-41 



19 1 6 received the class basketball cup. 

G. Hussey received the individual basketball cup. 

Basketball "S" awarded to: 

G. Hussey, 16 
E. Leland, '17 
E. Richardson, '16 
M. Wheeler, '16 
M. Yates, '16 




161 



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Officials 

Referee — Mr. Underwood. 
Judges — Mr. Mark, Mr. Coombs, Mr. Rabe. 
Official Score Keeper — Blanche Woodward, '16. 
Official Announcer — Marjorie Hulsizer, ' 16. 
Clerk of the Course — Katherine Leonard, '16. 
Managers — E. Richardson, '16. 

M. Driscoll, '17. 

N. Dill, '18. 

M. Daniels, '19. 

Entries 



1 9 1 6 
Bell. D. 
Hussey, G. 
Hammond, R. 
Wheeler, M. 
Whiting, M. 
Richardson, E. 

1918 
Alger, S. 
Deland, G. 
Meloon, I. 
Reilly, E. 
Shelley, K. 
Tibbetts, H. 
Waterbury, H. 



1917 
Dittmer, F. 
Leland, E. 
McMullin, J. 
Sheldon, G. 
Parker, M. 

1919 
Clark, E. 
Coburn, M. 
Gordon, M. 
Tones, C. 
Klein, M. 
Sanborn, R. 
Tyler, C. 
Watson, D. 
Zirngiebel, J. 




165 



FIELD DAY RESULTS 



Running High Jump. Record: 4 ft. 8 in. He'd by J. Blanchard, 

1. Wheeler, M., '16 
( Whiting, M., '16 

2. -j Coburn, M., '19 
t Klein, M., '19 



3 feet 1 1 Y% inches 
3 feet 1 1 inches 



12. 



Held by G. True, '1: 
76 feet ij4 inches 
74 feet 
63 feet 3/ / 2 inches 



Basketball Throw. Record: 66 ft. 11 in. 

1. Dittmer, F., '17 

2. Hussey, G., '16 

3. Leland, E., '17 

Shot Put. Record: 27 ft. 11 in. Held by G. True, '12. 

1. Dittmer, F., '17 26 feet 2 T /-> inches 

2. Shelley, K., '18 23 feet %]/i inches 

3. Yates, M., '16 21 feet 9 inches 

Baseball Throw. Record: 163 ft. Held by G. Hussey, '16. 



1. Hussey, G., '16 

2. Gordon, M., '19 

3. Deland, M., '18 

Running Broad Jump. Record: 13 ft. \y. 

1. Reilly, E., '18 

2. Parker, M., '17 

3. Hussey, G., '16 



169 feet 5 inches 
160 feet 
140 feet 

in. Held by M. Parker, '17. 

13 feet 5<s inches 

13 feet 40 4 inches 

12 feet 1 ij4 inches 



Standing Broad Jump. Record: 7 ft. 6 in. Held by G. True, '12. 



1. Watson, D., '19 

2. Parker, M., '17 

3. Waterbury, H., '18 

Javelin Throw. Record: 50 ft. y/2 in. 

1. Hussey, G., '16 

2. Jones, C, '19 

3. Gordon, M., '19 



7 feet 6-M inches 

7 feet i',s inches 

6 feet njs inches 

Held by G. Hussey, '16. 

57 feet 9 inches 

57 feet $¥> inches 

52 feet 4 inches 



First place in any event gives the winning class five points toward 
Field Day; second place, three points; third place, one point. 

Total Points 

191 6 — 21 1-3 
1917— 17 
1918 — 10 

1919— 14 2 "3 



166 



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Managers for the year 1916-1917 — K. Sprague, '17; H. Grauert, '19. 
The only game in the Fall was December 6, 19 16, when the Sopho- 
mores defeated the Seniors, 5 to 3. 

Hockey "S" was awarded to the following: 



M. Klein 
E. Briggs 
B. Brown 
E. Leland 
D. Watson 
M. Lyons 



M. Pollard 
E. Clarke 
E. Keith 
K. Sprague 
H. Gillette 



Gfetmis ioubbs 



1 9 1 6 

Mildred Bouve 
Gertrude Hussey 



1917 

Marian Bathgate 
Mabel Thompson 



1918 

Louise Beckwith 
Mary Tandy 



1919 

Mildred Gordon 
Anne Stolzenbach 



Junior-Freshman 
6 — 2, 6 — 2 



Senior-Sophomore 
8—6, 6—2 



Final : Senior-Freshman 
6 — 2, 6 — 1 

The tennis doubles cup was awarded to 1919. 



169 



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Sunday, June I i. 

Baccalaureate Service in the Harvard Church, Brookline, at 4.00 
o'clock. Sermon by the Reverend Willis Howard Butler, associate 
minister of the Old South Church. 




Monday, June 12. 
Senior Dance in South Hall, 321 Brookline Avenue, at 8.00 o'clock. 

Tuesday, June 13. 

Class Day Exercises, the presentation of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," 
on the college grounds at 3.00 o'clock. 

Concert by the Glee and Mandolin Clubs in South Hall at 8.00 o'clock. 

Glee Club Dance in South Hall at 10.00 o'clock. 

Wednesday, June 14. 

Commencement Exercises in the Harvard Church, Brookline, at 11.00 
o'clock. Address by the Reverend Albert Parker Fitch, D.D., Presi- 
dent of Andover Theological Seminary...'; 

Luncheon and Meeting of the Alumnae Association in the College 
Building immediately after the Commencement Exercises. 

Reception by President Lefavour to the Alumnae and their friends in 
South Hall at 8.00 o'clock. 

Thursday, June 15. 
Senior Luncheon in South Hall at 1.00 o'clock. 



173 



Processional Hymn 



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ittu-uarii CEtjurrlj, §>mti>ay, iuttc 11, 191 6 

Order of Worship 

Tune, "All Saints" 



R. Heber 



Invocation 

The Twenty-third Psalm 

Anthem 

Scripture Lesson 

Prayer 

Hymn 

Tune, "Rockingham" 

Baccalaureate Sermon 

The Reverend Willis Howard Butler 
Associate Minister of the Old South Church 
Prayer and Benediction 
Recessional Hymn A. A. Proctor 



Roberts 



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174 



(&in (Blub (Umtrnl 



I. Collegians 
II. June Rhapsody 



PROGRAM 
Mandolin Club 

Glee Club 



cirr. by Odell 
Daniels 



III. Serenade Widor 

1st violin, Katherine Kimball; 2nd violin, Estelle Freeman; 'cello, 
Ivy Meloon; piano, Lillian Fee 

IV. Un bel di from "Madam Butterfly" Puccini 

Ruth Howe 

V. Norwegian Slumber Song Gilder 

Mandolin Club 

VI. (a) Lament of the Scottish Women Hopekirk 
(Especially arranged for the club by the composer) 

(b) Lullaby Brahms 

(c) The Candy Lion Beach 

Glee Club 

VII. (a) Requiem (Stevenson) Homer 

(b) O, for a Breath of the Moorlands Whelpley 

(c) Songs My Mother Taught Me Dvorkd 

(d) Rolling down to Rio (Kipling) German 

Mr. G. Roberts Lunger 

VIII. (a) Swiss Mountain Song Eckerl 

Solo by Marjorie Soper 
(b) Waltz Simmonesque Odell 

Glee and Mandolin Club 

IX. Grind (a) Senior Grind 

(b) History of the Dump 

X. Alma Mater 

Accompanist: Alice Stevens, '17 

175 



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(Elass lay ferrrises 

Tuesday, June 13, 191 6 

Shakespeare's "The Tempest" was presented by members of the Senior 
Class under the direction of Miss Emily Hale. The dances of the Nymphs 
and Reapers were directed by Miss Florence Diall, and executed by Martha 
Whiting, Mildred Bouve, Florence Ross, Esther Hawkes, Marion Wheeler, 
Dorothy Bell, Olive Titus, Katherine Leonard, Esther Richardson, Helen 
Giere, Opal Fisher, Ruth Hammond, Pauline Shaltz, Helen Martin, with 
Rachel Drinker as solo dancer. 



PROGRAM 
Part I. 



DRAMATIS PERSONAL: 



Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan 

Miranda, daughter to Prospero 

Ferdinand, son of the King of Naples 

Ariel, an airy Spirit 

Caliban, a savage and deformed Slave 

Trinculo, a Jester 

Stephano, a drunken Butler 

Iris 

Ceres 

Juno 

Nymphs 

Reapers 

Scene : An Uninhabited Island 



Marjorie Hulsi.zer 

Olive Barnicoat 

Eva A. Jacobi 

Isabelle Hurlbutt 

Gertrude Hussey 

Beulah Knowles 

Leone Foote 

Frances Banks 

Marjorie Heseltine 

Ella Wood 



Presented by Spirits 



Act I 
Act II 
Act III 



Prologue : The Spirits 

The Island. Before Prospero's Cell 

Another Part of the Island 

Scene I ) n r r> , n n 

c tt r Before rrospero s Lell 

Scene 11 3 r 

Epilogue: The Spirits 



Part II. 
Step Singing 
Presentation of the Steps to 19 17 



177 



Oty? iEtetintth (Enmmnirpmimt 

Wednesday, June 14, 1916 

ORDER OF EXERCISES 

Prayer The Reverend Ambrose White Vernon, D.D. 

Minister of the Harvard Church, Brookline 

Commencement Hymn Washington Gladden 

Address The Reverend Albert Parker Fitch, D.D. 

President of Andover Theological Seminary 
Hymn : Veni Creator Spiritus 
Conferring of Degrees 
Chorus: Song of the World Adventurers 
Award of Certificates 
College Hymn 
Benediction 




178 



SENIOR LUNCHEON, JUNE 15 

Toastmistress, IsabElle Hurlbutt 

Speakers 

Household Economics Margaret Currier 

Secretarial Blanche Woodward 

Library Caroline Righter 

General Science Eva Jacobi 




179 




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GEORGE WASHINGTON PARTY 

On February 1 8th our annual George Washington Party was given 
by the Student Government Association in the Refectory. Coquettish 
Marthas and gallant Georges danced the somewhat incongruous fox trot. 
We were all entertained by a presentation of the life of George Washington 
in "movies." Truly some professionals might have profited by witnessing 
this performance. A minuet was charmingly danced by Opal Fisher and 
Katherine Shelley. 




SOPHOMORE LUNCHEON 

The annual Sophomore Luncheon was given by the Class of 191 S 
on April the 15th, and a gayer crowd ne'er assembled in our Refectory. 
Bright, sparkling toasts, enthusiastic songs, and a very successful enter- 
tainment were among the leading attractions. Second only to Keith's Cir- 
cuit were some of the vaudeville performances given by members of the 
class. Dorothy Blood acted as toastmistress, and the four different schools 
were represented by Anna Silver, General Science; Gladys Bishop, House- 
hold Economics; Helen Babcock, Library; and Katherine McManmon, 
Secretarial. Jean McCulloch was chairman of the committee in charge. 



182 




SENIOR HOUSE PARTY 

House Party — Straitsmouth Inn, Rockport, Mass., April 15-16, 19 16. 
Chaperoxe — Miss Diall. 




183 



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JUNIOR HOUSE PARTY 

House Party — Rockaway Inn, East Gloucester, April i q-i 6, 1916. 
Chaperones — Miss Brown, Mrs. Morton. 





184 



SERENADE 



Softly came we singing o'er the campus, 
The Junior Class to serenade, 

We woke you gently from your dreaming 
Of your Prom and all the happy plans 
you've made. 

Farewell to you, farewell to you, 
The finest class of Juniors ever, 

May the dreams come true 

We wish for you. 

And now we must depart. 



Seniors, we sing to thee, 
Sing we right heartily, 
We love thee tenderly, 

Seniors, our Seniors. 
Here's to your faces sweet! 
Here's to each day we meet, 
Here's to the Seniors, 

Sixteen, dear Sixteen. 



srilM. 



JUNIOR PROMENADE 

1917 has always been original, and she lived up to her reputation 
by having a snowstorm on April twenty-eighth, the day of Prom. How- 
ever, the rose-trimmed Refectory made the thought of the snow outside 
seem like a mere fantasy, and the sounds of gaiety that Boated outward 
told their own story. 

In the receiving line were Mary Pollard, president of the class, Dr. 
Sedgwick, Miss Williams, Dr. and Mrs. Farley, Mr. Goodell, Miss Hatch, 
Miss Gloster and Miss Adams. 

The members of the Class of 19 18 who served as ushers were: Verta 
Mills, Norma Dill, Millicent Bliss, Sarah Page, Alice Klein, Anna Silver, 
Laura Foster, Beatrice Church, Helen McCulloch, Cora Davidson, Harriet 
Leonard, Priscilla Bancroft, Eleanor Strong, Ruth Lawrence, Helen Bab- 
cock, Katherine Shelley, Marian Scott, Dorothy Blood, Eleanor Perry, 
Sylvia Wallace, Mary Tandy, Elinor Reilly. 

The next morning was as beautiful as the preceding one had been 
stormy, and many of the Juniors went to the neighboring shore resorts. 
In the afternoon 191 6 gave a The Dansant for the Juniors and their guests. 

Saturday evening, North and South Halls were open for dancing, and 
refreshments were served in the small houses during the evening. There 
were also several theatre parties on Saturday evening. 




187 



MAY DAY 

We owe the "Weather Man" a vote of thanks for having provided 
a warm, sunny morning for our May Day revels. The fresh, green lawn 
of the campus, decorated with brilliant crocuses and daffodils, furnished 
a fitting background for the crowning of the "Fairest Queen of the May." 
This queen, Katherine Leonard, president of 1916, attended by her ten 
small ladies-in-waiting, was entertained by a dainty May-pole dance. The 
newly-crowned Queen sent greetings to her loyal subjects in the form of 
red roses and strawberry short-cake. 




ELECTION DAY 

This year on May 19th, for the second time in its history, Simmons 
celebrated election day. The results of all elections were kept secret until 
five o'clock, when all the students assembled around the Refectory steps, 
in class groups. The Seniors in their caps and gowns sat on the steps and 
behind them on the colonnade were masses of flowers which the different 
organizations gave to their newly-elected officers. When the officers were 
announced the girls cheered and sang with great enthusiasm, as each officer 
mounted the steps to receive her flowers and congratulations. 

We had supper on the lawn followed by one of the best step singings 
of the year. 



188 








JUNIOR-SENIOR PICNIC 
May 27, 19 1 6 

Preparedness being the fashion, Simmons was not to be outdone, when 
three hundred Seniors and Juniors started out for Nantasket expecting the 
best time of the whole year. 

A track meet was the first event on the programme. Dartmouth, 
Harvard, Yale, and Amherst held a hotly contested meet which was finally 
won by Dartmouth. The track meet closed with a big preparedness parade, 
led by Miss Goodrich in her famous goose step. 

Then came the welcome order to form in circles on the sand and, Oh, 
those eats! They made us feel like Eugene Field's little boy, "who wished 
that his stomach was as hungry as his eyes." 

"Paragon" next offered its attractions, and, until boat time, the sand 
bumps, roller coaster, and other attractions were kept in full swing. Else 
Claussen arranged the picnic delightfully. 




189 



FRESHMAN FROLIC 

"Freshman Frolic 
Comes tomorrow. 
Find a kid's dress 
You can borrow." 

They were all there — big ones, little ones, fat ones, thin ones, some 
with curls and some without. It was the last chance to play, and how they 
did frolic ! There were races — three-legged and potato, too, and dancing 
to hurdy-gurdy music. Since it was a real party for children, there were 
ice cream cones, peanuts, lollipops, and all good things to make them 
happy. On this day 19 19 said good-bye to baby days. 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT RECEPTION 

The annual reception given by the Student Government Association 
to all entering students was held on Saturday afternoon, September 23. 
Those in the receiving line were: Marion Doten, President of the As- 
sociation, President Lefavour, Dean Arnold, Miss Gloster, Miss Adams, 
Mrs. Prime, Eleanore Keith, Frances Dittmer, Christine Ricker, and Mary 
Pollard. 

Members of the Junior Welcoming Committee acted as ushers and 
aided in getting people acquainted. Cards were given the new students on 
which they tried to get the autographs of all the upper classmen whom they 
met during the afternoon. Refreshments were served and dancing en- 
joyed by everyone. 

190 



IT (^ IF^ <^> i@ftf2> 




DORMITORY GOVERNMENT DANCE 

On September 29 the Dormitory Government Association gave a 
welcoming dance to the Freshmen. Such gay girls and pretty gowns were 
scarcely ever seen in. the Refectory. Each new girl was escorted by an 
upper class girl, who proved to the new students that a "girl dance" at 
Simmons was a most enjoyable affair. 

In the receiving line were Mary Pollard, President of the Dormitory 
Government Association, Dean Arnold, Miss Gloster, Miss Goodrich, Mrs. 
Prime, Sally Thompson, Sally Page and Rae Finslerwald. The members 
of the Junior Welcoming Committee ushered the girls through the re- 
ceiving line. 



JUNIOR-FRESHMAN PARTY 

Since 1920 had won the love of 191 8, the two classes were united 
bv the marriage of Miss 191 8 to Mr. 1920. After the ceremony refresh- 
ments were served by the caterer, a portly colored gentleman who bore a 
strange resemblance to a member of the Junior Class. The bride and 
groom departed amid a shower of gay-colored streamers and confetti. 




191 







■B #- 
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HALLOWE'EN 

Hallowe'en was celebrated by us on 
October 28 this year. Because of our 
recent quarantine there were no guests 
from outside the dormitories. It was a 
gay, though grotesque, masquerade 
party, which sat down to the delicious 
Hallowe'en dinner, enlivened by songs, 
Hallowe'en games, and stunts. Then 
the lights were turned out, and, clustered 
around a blazing caldron, the masquer- 
aders heard weird ghost stories. 

Near the hour of midnight the Sopho- 
more ghosts came forth and clanked 
through the halls, chanting a blood- 
curdling dirge. They were disturbed in 
their plum pudding feast by the Juniors, 
who descended upon them, bent on res- 
cuing some of their classmates kidnapped 
during the parade. A lively battle en- 
sued until all were sent to their beds as 
the clock struck twelve. 



SOPHOMORE LUNCHEON 

This year the annual Sophomore Luncheon given by the Class of 
1 9 1 9 took place on the eighteenth of November. The Sophomore Lunch- 
eon has previously been given in the Spring, but this year it was inter- 
changed with the Sophomore-Senior Luncheon owing to quarantine. The 
event quite surpassed all anticipations, and such dramatic skill was ex- 
hibited by the performers in the vaudeville show which followed under 
the direction of Hildegard Drummond that the guests could not be forced 
to leave until encores were refused. 



The speakers were : 

Toastmistress 
Library School 
General Science 
Household Economics 
Secretarial School 
Class of 19 1 9 
Address 



Margaret Daniels 

Katharine Rock 

Marion McCann 

Della Watson 

Marion Lyons 

Carita Hunter 

Miss Arnold 



The chairman of the committee in charge of the luncheon was Cath- 
erine Tyler. 

192 



FOUNDER'S DAY CONVOCATION 

A new custom was instituted this year when the faculty and student 
hody celebrated the anniversary of the founding of the College by John 
Simmons. Classes were suspended for the afternoon of November r, and 
the students assembled at Harvard Church, in Brookline. There was a 
very impressive procession of the faculty in their caps and gowns. Presi- 
dent Lefavour and Professor Moore gave interesting addresses on the 
significance of the day, after which several degrees were conferred. 





















It. . 




FJI 


< I - ' T* jgtgj 












1 ^F >«w- 


r ■ ■ 



"THE LAST STAND OF THE SIOUX" 

On the evening of November 24 the Refectory was filled to welcome 
Dr. Charles Eastman, a real Sioux Indian, who had come at the invitation 
of the Seniors to tell of the life and character of his people. 

He appeared in native costume — not of course forgetting his feathers 
and paint. His lecture was a worthy and fitting tribute to the fortitude, 
courage, and integrity of his tribe, and especially to the women from 
whom the boys had received their Spartan training. He showed why 
the Sioux became hostile to the whites, and concluded his talk by a very 
vivid and detailed description of "Custer's Last Charge." 

Gladvs Sheldon was chairman of the committee who arranged for this 
very interesting evening. 



193 



CHRISTMAS PARTY 



On December 15 our annual Christmas Party 
was held in the Refectory. As usual, it took the 
form of the old English Christmas of the country 
squire in the sixteenth century. Marion Doten 
and Eleanore Keith were the host and hostess for 
the evening. With their retinue, which included 
the Monk, Red Cardinal, gorgeously gowned 
Lords and Ladies, the Herald, Pages, and Jester, 
they sat at the table upon the dais. Scarcely had 
the guests been welcomed by the Lady of the Man- 
or, when voices were heard outside the window 
singing Christmas carols. They were wandering 
choir boys who soon entered the hall and were in- 
vited to dine with the other guests. 
And such a feast ! Eaten by candle-light, without forks, and with no 

tablecloths, it was suggestive of the 16th century. 

Following the dinner was an entertainment consisting of ballads and 

folk-songs sung by Miss Emily Hale, tableaux from the "Birds' Christmas 

Carol," and dancing. 

Sally Thompson acted as chairman of the party. 






194 



n c^ it^. <^>^ 




MIRACLE PLAY 

Because of the enthusiasm shown last year, the Coventry Nativity Play 
was again given by the YAV.C.A. this Christmas. The acting was very 
well done and much credit is due the girls who took part as well as the 
Glee Club which sang carols. 

The cast of characters was as follows: 



Isaiah 

Mary 

Joseph 

First Shepherd 

Second Shepherd 

Third Shepherd 

First King 

Second King 

Third King 

King Herod 

A Herald 

An Angel 



Frances Dittmer 

Julia Jochum 

Marion Robertson 

Jessie McMullin 

Eleanor Jones 

Catherine Tyler 

Louise Beckwith 

Sally Page 

Esther Gregory 

Helena Tibbetts 

Claire MacDonald 

Hildegard Drummond 



CHRISTMAS VESPER SERVICE 

December 17, 1916 

Organ Prelude: March of the Magi 

Bethlehem 
Processional : Adeste Fideles 
Scripture Reading 

Dr. Farley 
Choir: Carol — When Christ Was Born 
The Lord's Prayer 
Solo: An Old Sacred Lullaby 

Miss Ruth Howe 
Address 

Dean Arnold 
Organ Selection: Pastoral Symphony (Messiah) 
Choir: Carols — (a) Holv Night 

(b) Noel 
Hymn: Joy to the World, the Lord Is Come! 
Prayer 

Recessional: Hark! the Herald Angels Sing 
Organ Postlude: Hallelujah Chorus (Messiah) 



Dubois 

Mailing 



Reinecke 

Corn or 

G. F. Handel 



G. F. Handel 



195 



DRAMATICS 



THE TWELVE POUND LOOK 

AND 

MISS CIVILIZATION 

PRESENTED SY THE SlMMONS COLLEGE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION 

Refectory, Saturday, December 9, 1916, at 8.00 p.m. 

The Twelve Pound Look 

by J. M. Barrie 

Sir Harry Margaret E. Daniels, 19 

Lady Sims 

Kate 

Tombes 



Edith Gleason, '20 
Marion Fitch, '19 

Ella Matthews, '20 



SCENE— A Room at Sir Harry's. 
TIME— The Present. 

Music by the Mandolin Club 



Miss Civilization 



by Richard Harding Davis 




Alice Ruth Wellington, 


20 


Hatch Elizabeth Lewis, 


19 


Reddy Margaret Pickles, 


'9 


Harry Elsie Rieger. 


18 


Chief of Police Tilly Svenson, 


19 


Brakemen, etc. 





Miss Sarah L. Arnold 
Miss Jennie Gloster 
Miss Adams 



SCENE — A Dining Room. 
TIME— The Present. 

Patrons and Patronesses : 

Miss Frances Morse 
Miss Mary E. Williams 



I 



Mr. and Airs. Robert T. Paine 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank E. Farley 
Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Mark 



Chairmen of Committees: 



Dra'natic Sally Page Clean-up 

Costume and Make-up Marion Bathgate Publicity 

Scenery and Property Sally Thompson Door ami Floor 



Gertrude Ellis 

Dorothy McKissock 

Louise Johnson 



Miss Lucia Briggs 



Coaches : 



196 



Miss Emilv I lali 



BROWN UNIVERSITY MUSICAL CLUBS 

Friday Evening, January 12, 1917. 

PROGRAM 

1. Brown Medley Combined Clubs 

2. Winter's Song Vocal Quartet 

A. Barnard, '15, 1st Tenor W. K. Sprague, '17, Baritone 

E. M. Pearce, '17, 2nd Tenor A. B. Homer, '17, Bass 

3. Selection Popular Airs 

Mandolin Quartet 

G.W.C.Vaughan, '18, 1st Mandolin H.A.Burnham, "19, Tenor Mandolin 
A.L.Caron, '18, Mandola A. B. Homer, '17, Guitar 

4. Hunting Song Robin Hood 
Tinkers' Song 

Glee Club 

5. Reading Selected 

Myles Standish, '20 

6. Solo Selected 

E. M. Pearce, '17 

7. Fantasia from "Carmen" 

Mandolin Club 

8. Carry Me Back to Old Virginny 

9. Hanging of Danny Deever 

Myles Standish, '20 

10. Poor Butterfly 

1 1. Musical Trust 

Glee Club 

1 2. Violin Selection 

E. H. Bowen, '19, Violin A. F. Bowen, '19, Violin 

13. Selected Vocal Quartet 

14. I Left Her on the Beach at Honolulu Popular Air 

Mandolin Club 

15. Reading Selected 



Bizet 
Vocal Quartet 

Kipling 

Mandolin Club 
Hadley 



16. Brown Songs 



Myles Standish, '20 

H. Fulton, '20, Accompanist 

197 



Glee Club 





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Nineteen-Seventeen leaves the following records of its illustrious mem- 
bers for the enlightenment of future classes. All the characteristics which 
this most versatile class possesses are not mentioned here, the absence 
being due chiefly to lack of space. 



MOST POPULAR 







"It i 

and to 


? pleasing to he pointed at with the finger 
have it said, 'There goes the wan.' 


— — 




- 






Marion Doten 
Mary Pollard 
Eleanore Keith 

MOST TACTFUL 






1 


In 


"It - 
■tful 


aas this memory of individual trails and Jiis 
use of it that helped to launch him on the 








sea of 


social success." . 








Marion Doten 
Mary Pollard 
Natalie Betts 








BEST ALL-ROUND GIRL 












Eleanore Keith 
Mary Pollard 
Jessie McMullin 
Alma Smith 


H 




Br • 

P-3 






MOST RESPECTED 
"/ do respect thee as my soul." 


■^ 




■ 






Eleanore Keith 
Mary Pollard 
Marion Doten 



200 



BRIGHTEST 

"Of all the girls that arc so smart, 
There's none like pretty Sally." 

Mary Parker 
Jessie McMullin 
Mary McLoughlin 



BEST STUDENT 

"En/lamed with the study of learning." 

Mary Parker 
Jessie McMullin 
Edna Havnes 



BEST LOOKING 

'Queen rose of the rosebud garden of girls. 

Helen Harlow 
Eva Leland 
Dorothy Van Orden 





201 





BUSIEST 

"Too busy with the crowded hour to fear to live 
or die." 

Winifred George 

Alma «Smith 

Jessie McMullin 



BEST BLUFFER 

"A bluff is an external something for an internal 
nothing." 

Betty Hammond 
Ada Bauer 
Jessie McMullin 



BEST DRESSED 

'For the apparel oft proclaims the man." 

Betty Hammond 
Marion Driscoll 
Louise Murphy 



202 



NEATEST 

"Still to be neat, still to be drest, 
As you were going to a feast." 

Mildred Morton 
Abby Partridge 
Katherine Manning 




BEST NATURE D 

'Man is the merriest species of the creation." 

Florence Soden 
Abbie Glover 
Louise Johnson 
Carolyn Davis 





MOST CONSCIENTIOUS 

A sense of duty pursues us ever." 

Harriet Fuller 
Mary Peters 
Cordelia Potter 



203 








MOST ATHLETIC 

"Here rose an athlete, strong to break or bind, 
All force in bonds that might endure." 

Eva Leland 
Mary Parker 
Jessie McMullin 



LEAST APPRECIATED 

Me 

Mic Board 

Persimmons 




MOST DIGNIFIED 

"Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye, 
In every gesture dignity and love." 

Frances Dittmer 
Helen Foster 
Marion Doten 



204 



MOST VERSATILE ■- 

'The versatile mind, ever ready to turn its at- 
tention in a new and unexplored quarter." 

Jessie McMullin 
Peg Gladwin 
Marion Driscoll 
Marion Doten 







*'**% 








¥*m 


















|P 



MOST CAPABLE 

'Man's capacities have never been measured." 

Mary Pollard 
Else Claussen 
Marion Doten 



■jJHlig'gJB ~ ' 

Mr 



BEST SPORT 

"Sport, that wrinkled Care derides, 
And Laughter holding both her sides." 

Chris Ricker 
Alma Smith 
Helen Gillette 



205 






WITTIEST 

"True wit is nature to advantage drest, 
Jl'hat oft was thought, but ne'er as well ex- 
pressed." 

Louise Giblin 
Mary McLoughlin 
Helen Clancey 



MOST ORIGINAL 

"A thought is often original, though yon have 
uttered it a hundred times." 

Marian Bathgate 
Ruth Corwin 
Adele Waterman 
Ruth Hudnut 




MOST CAREFREE 

"Hang sorrow/ Care will kill a cat, 
And therefore let's be merry." 

Louise Murphy 
Betty Hammond 

Beatrice Brown 



206 



MOST PROMISING 

'My native country was full of youthful promise." 

Adele Shohan 
Phyllis Lapham 
Eleanore Keith 





207 



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We, the 
possession of 
to depart this 
as follows : 

T 

II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XIII. 

XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 



(Elasa Will 

class of 1 9 1 7 of Simmons College, being as ever( ?) in full 

our senses, being of disposing mind and memory, and about 

college life do hereby make this our last will and testament 

We give and bequeath to the Junior Class the right to wear 
Cap and Gown and the Privilege of self-chaperonage. 
We bequeath to above mentioned class our seats in Chapel. 
To the Junior Class also we bequeath the work of carrying 
on the Microcosm. 

To aforesaid class we give our prowess in athletics, our 
skill in dramatics, our leadership in music, our excellence in 
scholarship and our universal popularity. 
To the Sophomores we bequeath a splendid spirit of loyalty 
to Simmons. 

We give to the Freshmen an inspiring example of college 
girl and a lot of good advice. 

Barbara Abbott leaves a few feet of her manly stature to 
her roommate, Helen Deane. 

Marion Ayer gives and devises to Grace Baker a collection 
of good marks. 

Hannah Baldwin bequeaths her worried look to Kay Mc- 
Manmon. 

To Miss Rush, lone Baldwin leaves several books of pos- 
tage stamps which she bought at wholesale price. 
Edith Barton gives and bequeaths to Elsie Rieger her viva- 
cious manner and hilarity. 

Marian Bathgate resigns her position as champion of the 
ioo-yd. dash on the tennis court in favor of Mary Tandy. 
Ada Bauer leaves her quiet, demure ways to the Junior 
"Ssh" Committee. 

To the Freshmen Class, Constance Beal leaves her "high 
brow. 

Esther Beckford bequeaths to Helen Babcock her ability 
to smile ever so sweetly. 

Natalie Betts enjoins Sally Thompson to look after 1919 
and be kind to all Natalie's friends. 

To Marion Abbott, Dorothy Black bequeaths an individual 
and rare collection of the best authors. 

Mildred Bliss leaves an excellent suggestion to the college 
— to have the affiliated houses a distance of only 15 miles. 
Peg Bond leaves as a parting gift a strong box which she 
found of use in the safe keeping of the enormous wealth 
of 191 7. 

209 



f" 



XX. Marion Boom gives and devises her carefree manner to 

Gladys Bishop. 
XXI. Marion Bowman bequeaths a very valuable volume on "Love 
and Marriage" to the College Library. 
XXII. Helen Boyce leaves the perfect marcelle wave in her hair 
to the most needy Junior. 

XXIII. Frances Bradley gives and bequeaths to Julia Jochum her 
interest in Chemistry. 

XXIV. To Gladys Wiener in remembrance of college days Beatrice 
Brown bequeaths her ring. 

XXV. Lela Brown, in keeping with her social principles, bequeaths 
a dormitory to Simmons. 
XXVI. Marion Burnes gives and bequeaths all her knowledge in 

Household Arts to the Freshies. 
XXVII. Marie Chaplin leaves to the Junior Class an exceedingly 
interesting booklet, "Advice on All Matters of the Heart, 
Its Structure and Functions." 
XXVIII. Blanche Childs gives and devises her curious ways and many 
questions to the Sophomores. 
XXIX. Helen Clancey bequeaths an ambulance to the Simmons rep- 
resentative of the M.S.P.C.A. 
XXX. Helen Clark gives to Anne Silver her dignity. 
XXXI. To North Hall Else Claussen gives and bequeaths a pack- 
age of light-cut slips. 
XXXII. Ruth Corwin gives to Isabelle Starbuck her aesthetic giggles. 

XXXIII. Alma Cottrell bequeaths some war literature to Dr. Varrell 
for use in compiling a history. 

XXXIV. Nathalie Cox gives and bequeaths to Geneva Daland every- 
thing but her solitaire. 

XXXV. Marion Craig gives and devises to Katherine Shelley an 
article on "How to Live Under the Weight of 7x7 Crushes." 
XXXVI. Phoebe Currier leaves to Gladys Dodge her extreme talk- 
ativeness and sweet manner. 
XXXVII. Caroline Davis gives and bequeaths a few pet microbes to 
Helen Jacobs. 
XXXVIII. To Charlotte Ford, Ruth Davis leaves the latest edition of 
the Encyclopedia Britannica for handy reference. 
XXXIX. Helen Decelle gives and bequeaths her studiousness to Eliza- 
beth Talbot. 
XL. Frances Dittmer, as president of the Y.W., passes her du- 
ties on to her successor. 
XLI. Ethel Dole bequeaths an original and carefully thought-out 
article on "Man" to the Students' Room. 
XLII. Marion Doten gives and bequeaths the head of Miss Student 
Government to her successor in 1 9 1 8. 

210 



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XLIII. Marion Driscoll leaves to Verta Mills steps for dancing 

through life. 
XLIV. Gertrude Dunmore gives and bequeaths to the Social and 
Civic Club an undying faith in Woman and a suffrage 
banner. 
XLV. Marjorie Eastman leaves a cake of yeast to raise the endow- 
ment fund over night. 
XLVI. Nettie Eastman leaves a sole request to the College — to 
start classes at 12.00 instead of 9.00 A.M. 
XLVII. Gertrude Ellis bequeaths the dormitory store to the Junior 
who has the smallest appetite, Miss Goodrich to be the 
judge. 
XLVI 1 1. Evelyn Emerson gives and devises her "social" leanings to 
the New Hampshire Club. 
XLIX. Anna Enarson bequeaths "principles" — to whomsoever sorely 
feels the need of principles. 
L. Lillian Fee gives and devises to the Gym several baskets 
that she shot during her sportsmanlike career. 
LI. Marion Fish leaves to 191 8 two hundred shorthand note- 
books that she has filled. 
LII. Florence Flanders gives and bequeaths to the Sewing De- 
partment tatting, more tatting, and still more tatting. 
LIII. Helen Foster bequeaths to Bernice Field her ever low voice. 
LIV. Esther Foster gives and devises her bewildered innocent look 
to 1 92 1. 
LV. To Mary Randall, Doris Frizzell leaves her stick-to-it-ive- 
ness and her speed on the typewriter. 
LVI. Harriet Fuller gives and devises her wayward ways to Y.W. 
LVII. Winifred George gives and bequeaths to the Freshmen one- 
half of her energy and the art of stretching a day into 48 
hours. 
LVIII. Louise Giblin gives and bequeaths her histrionic chair to the 
College. 
LIX. Helen Gillette gives and bequeaths her ever-present smile 

and sunny ways to Gertrude Franz. 
LX. Margaret Gladwin leaves her poise and sweet dignity to the 

Sophomores. 
LXI. Abbie Glover gives and devises her good nature to the 
Faculty. 
LXII. Bertha Govan gives a few feet (in length) to Claire Myron. 
LXIII. Helen Grady gives and bequeaths her angelic disposition 

to all 19 1 8. 
LXIV. Marion Grady bequeaths her Simmons ring to — See codicil 

N .°-.3- 
LXV. Lillian Graham bequeaths her ingenious little brain to next 

year's art editor of the Mic. 
211 



LXVI. 

LXVII. 

LXVIII. 

LXIX. 
LXX. 

LXXI. 
LXXII. 

LXXIII. 

LXXIV. 
LXXV. 

LXXVI. 
LXXVII. 

LXXVI II. 

LXXIX. 
LXXX. 

LXXXI. 

LXXXII. 

LXXXIII. 

LXXXIV. 

LXXXV. 

LXXXVI. 

LXXXVIL 

LXXXVI II. 

LXXXIX. 



Esther Gregory gives and devises her keen interest in cur- 
rent events to Sally Page. 

Eleanor Gregory leaves to the college anything but her 
twin. 

Katherine Hagerty bequeaths to Anna Moran a list of ques- 
tions which her graduation from Simmons interrupted. 
Betty Hammond leaves her studiousness to Dorothy Mackie. 
Kathleen Haney gives and bequeaths to Millicent Bliss a 
Remington card-case which Kathleen found of no further 
use after she got her medal. 

Helen Harlow bequeaths to Blanche Macrae a contagious 
laugh and one coronet braid. 

Elvira Hass gives and devises to the English Department 
some perfectly good jokes passed by the National Board 
of Censorship. 

Ina Hawes gives and bequeaths to Madeleine Kingsley a 
few thousand words which shortness of breath prevented 
her from uttering. 

Edna Haynes leaves her conscientiousness to the Y. W. 
Madge Heald gives her drag with the Secretarial faculty to 
Eleanor Strong. 

Pauline Hitt leaves a string of jokes to Peterborough House 
Grace Hodges gives and devises her conservative ways to 
the Social and Civics Club. 

Jennie Holbrook gives and bequeaths to Pearl Andrews a 
pack of cards and a weakness for midnight peregrinations. 
Mabel Holland bequeaths her dignity to the Freshmen. 
Olive Hopkins leaves to Helen Waterbury a Maine pillow 
to be handled with care. 

Ruth Hudnut gives and bequeaths her quiet and retiring 
manner to the Class of 1920. 

Louise Johnson bequeaths her "taking ways" with the faculty 
and students. 

Anne Jones gives and devises a keen sense of humor to Hazel 
Timmerman. 

Rose Karnan gives and bequeaths her loquaciousness to Alice 
Klein. 

Eleanore Keith leaves to her success in 191 8 all the honor 
— and duties — attached to the presidential chair. 
Katharine Kimball bequeaths an orchestra to the student 
body. 

Frances King bequeaths good advice and one of her helping 
hands to the irrepressible Sophomores. 

Anna Kirby leaves to Household Ecs her skill in manipulat- 
ing a needle. 
Ruth Lander leaves — us forever. 



212 



XC. Edna Lane gives and bequeaths to the Student Government 
Association several hundred honor quotations and a box of 
chalk. 
XCI. Phyllis Lapham leaves to the Secretarial Juniors the work 
which she has already completed and which is not due for 
one year from date. 
XCII. Fay Lawrence. gives and bequeaths to Estelle Wolff her bust- 
ling manner and hilarious spirit. 
XCIII. Eva Leland hands her basketball fame down to Elinor Reilly. 
XCIY. Beatrice Mauk gives and devises her pleasing manner and 
her willingness to overlook faults in others to the faculty. 
XCV. Julia McCabe advises next year's cheer leader to use Sloan's 
Liniment. 
XCYI. Cecilia McCarthy bequeaths her boisterous hilarity to Peg 
Raser. 
XCVII. Mabel Mackenzie leaves to 191 8 the show-case and its 

treasures. 
XCVIII. Mary McLoughlin gives and bequeaths her sympathy and 
three typewriters to the Editor of the 19 18 Microcosm. 
XCIX. Jessie McMullin bequeaths to Louise Beckwith a long, long 
smile and a vivacious manner. 
C. Katherine Manning leaves a trusty "Pathfinder" to the 
Newtonites. 
CI. Pearl Mason gives and bequeaths the latest thing in laughs, 
going through eight octaves, to Rhoda Lawrence. 
CI I. Betty Miller leaves as a reminder the annals recorded during 

this year. 
CIII. Romayne Milliken gives to Marian Scott an interesting 

booklet, "Go Through College Without Studying." 
CIV. Mildred Morton leaves one million dollars to the Micro- 
cosm Fund. 
CV. Harriet Mower bequeaths some additional general reading 
to the Business Methods Course. 
CVI. Catharine Munt entrusts her interests in the Secretarial De- 
partment to Dorothy Day. 
CVII. Louise Murphy offers a collection of beauty hints to the 
faculty. 
CVIII. Mary Murphy bequeaths a railroad ticket to Margaret 
Wiggin. 
CIX. Lucy Nash gives her musical talent to the Glee Club. 
CX. Louise O'Malley leaves a request with the Education De- 
partment to abolish settlement classes. 
CXI. Margaret Ormond leaves a new cataloguing system to Miss 
Donnelly. 
CXII. Ernestine Packard gives and bequeaths a chair to North 
Hall Parlor. 

213 



CXIII. Alice Parker bequeaths to the Sophs her original ideas and 

theories. 
CXIV. Mary Parker gives to Madeline Rowan the record she broke 

in broad-jumping way back in Freshman days. 
CXV. Belle Parnell leaves her ideas on suffrage to Eleanor Perry. 
CXVI. Abby Partridge gives and bequeaths her neatness to Betty 

Jones. 
CXVII. Margaret Peirce leaves her mandolin to the club. 
CXVIII. Mary Peters transfers her highly developed conscientious- 
ness in academic lines to Helen Swanton. 
CXIX. Mary Pollard hands Dormitory Government over to the 
Juniors with her good wishes. 
CXX. Cordelia Potter leaves a list of questions to be answered in 
the instructor's leisure moments. 
CXXI. Dorothea Rice gives hints on slumbering quietly in Psych 

lecture to Dorothy Annable. 
CXXII. Gladys Richardson bequeaths her frivolity and mad esca- 
pades to Ruth Richards. 
CXXIII. Christine Ricker leaves money for a new gym to Simmons. 
CXXIV. Margaret Riegel bequeaths a plank to the Socialist party. 
CXXV. Reena Roberts gives and devises her dignity to her Junior 
friends. 
CXXVI. Helen Ruggles leaves to Gertrude Robinson a smile — merely 
that and nothing more. 
CXXVII. Grace Rutan leaves us with our congratulations. 
CXXVIII. Etta Sadow bequeaths to Inez Hoyt a book of argumenta- 
tion entitled, "Should Seniors Be Shown Deference and Re- 
spect?" 
CXXIX. Ethel Schuman asks the faculty to institute more courses 

in sewing. 
CXXX. Miriam Segel leaves Simmons with a big, blazing S.B. which 

she surely deserves. 
CXXXI. Gladys Sheldon leaves her roommate to the care of the suc- 
ceeding classes. 
CXXXII. Adele Shohan leaves a guide-book for wandering in the 
realms of Lit to Gertrude Wilson. 
CXXXIII. Ruth Slade leaves her classmates memories of a very pleas- 
ing companion. 
CXXXIV. Alma Smith bequeaths some of her superfluous college spirit 
to Priscilla Bancroft. 
CXXXV. Fayetta Smith gives and bequeaths to Peterborough House 
an additional parlor. 
CXXXVI. Vera Smith leaves the fund of information she possesses to 
all her friends. 
CXXXVI I. Florence Soden gives and bequeaths her good-nature and 
her distinctive laugh to South Hall. 

214 



CXXXVIII. Una Spaller beqeaths her love of story (anecdote) telling 
to Mary Hamblett. 
CXXXIX. Margaretta Spooner gives advice of non-crushable nature 

to & . 

CXL. [Catherine Sprague bequeaths pictures and songs, songs and 
pictures to the Juniors. 
CXLI. Ada Stanley gives and bequeaths a very good-looking Rem- 
ington medal to Florence White. 
CXLII. Gladys Steele leaves her unassuming manner to the whole 

of 191 8. 
CXLIII. Alice Stevens gives a piano to the Gym. 

CXLIV. Clara Stover bequeaths salad recipes to the Cookery De- 
partment. 
CXLV. Idelle Tapley leaves to the Library, as light reading, a copy 
of the decimal classification system. 
CXLVI. Gladys Thompson gives and devises her love of a good 
time to the Freshmen. 
CXLVII. Mabel Thompson leaves a microscope to the Biology De- 
partment. 
CXLVIII. Willamay Toland advises underclassmen to make more use 
of the interrogation mark. 
CXLIX. Helen Tolman bequeaths her generosity and good-nature to 
everybody. 
CL. Dorothy Turner gives and devises her jolly way to the House- 
hold Ec Department. 
CLI. Dorothy Van Orden leaves her love to some of the Sophs. 
CLII. Margaret Walker leaves two or three discarded sweaters to 
the Red Cross Club of Simmons. 

CLIII. Ida Walkey bequeaths her sweet mannerisms to . 

CLIV. Adele Waterman leaves a lantern for getting an insight into 
studies — and other things. 
CLV. Helen Whiting bequeaths a keen interest in the Teutonic 
race. 
CLVI. Lillian Winn leaves a smile (none such) to disheartened 

Freshmen. 
CLVIL Margaret Wood bequeaths to Ethel Garey some bulky 
letters. 
CLVIII. Victoria Zehringer leaves "the bloom of youth" to the grave 
Seniors who follows us. 

And last we hereby constitute and appoint Sylvia Wallace to be the 
executrix of this our last will and testament, in witness whereof we have 
hereunto set our hand and seal this twenty-sixth day of March, One Thou- 
sand Nine Hundred and Seventeen. 



215 



OFFICIAL DISPATCHES FROM THE SCENES OF ACTION. 

PSYCOLONIKA, GREECE. 

An attack en masse was made upon the nervous system. General 
Burtano reports the result as unsatisfactory, the household economics di- 
vision proceeding too quickly in advance of the secretarial and library di- 
visions who showed themselves untrained and inexperienced in this branch 
of educational warfare. 

England, February 16. 

The 2a division of the English aviation corps, under the leadership 
of Doctor Farley, have returned from a successful trip to the clouds. Much 
valuable information was gained, and the secret messages of Shelley, Car- 
lyle, and Arnold discovered. Although it is a hazardous trip and at times 
somewhat discouraging, the entire corps is in a safe and sane condition. 

France, Nov., 191 6. 

Great joy is being manifested throughout the Physical Republic and 
the cross of the Legion of Honour has been pinned on General Tschaler 
for his noble work. The crew on the submarine Pi were caught in the 
net laid in Archimedes Channel. Five are reported as lost and the re- 
mainder of the crew, twenty in number, are floundering about hopelessly. 
All are Fre(n)shmen. 

November 15, 191 6. 

The firing in the secretarial region was unusually heavy during the 
past twenty-four hours. The echo of typewriters was heard at a distance 
of three miles, as a result of which blue cards have been flying in all direc- 
tions leaving great havoc in their wake. The affiliated houses in the sur- 
rounding country seem to bear the greatest signs of disaster and many 
homes where happiness once reigned are rendered wretched and forlorn 
by the unexpected hostility of their enemies. 



FAVORITE DANCES 

Freshmen — Hesitation 
Cookery i — Fox (Fackt's) Trot. 
German 5 — Military Stamp. 
Chemistry i — Maxixe (Mark's E' 



216 



Jan. 1 2 

7-3° 

7-35 
8.00 

8.45 
9.00 

9-53 

9-55 

10.47 

10.50 
11.45 

12-35 
12.45 

1. 10 

i-35 
2.30 

3-25 
4.20 

5-i5 
5-30 
6.00 
6.30 

7-3° 
10.30 



Jan. 12 

9.00 
10.30 
1 1. 00 
11.45. 

12.30 
2.00 
5.00 
6.00 

7-30 

8.00 

10.00 



AS IT IS 

Breakfast. 

Breakfast over. 

Study. 

Marathon across the dump. 

Class — oral themes. 

Conversation of two words in the corridor. 

Class — quiz. 

Mad dash to bookstore for the necessaries of life. 

Class — recitation. 

Hour test 

Bell. Scramble for lunch at the dorms. 

Lunch over. 

Meeting at college. 

Class 

Class 

Class 

Basketball practice 

Home 

Coolidge 

Dinner 

House Meeting 

Study 

Bed. O-o-h I'm so tired ! And I haven't done a thing all day. 

Betty, will you set Big Ben for 6? I have a quiz that I must 

study for. 

AS IT SHOULD BE 

Breakfast 

Dropped into lecture but didn't stay long 

Chatted in the halls and made a lot of noise 

Went into town and shopped with Miss Walker. She said my 

absence would be redeemable. 

Lunched at the Touraihe 

Theatre 

Tea 

Came home for dinner 

8.00 Study 

Fudge party 

Bed. O-o-h I'm so tired! This has been such a strenuous day! 

And tomorrow! Three classes! (Over the transom) Peggy, 

please don't call me in the morning; I think I'll use up four of my 

cuts. 



218 



THE CHILDREN'S HOUR 

(With all due apologies to H. W. L. ) 

As the hour of ten approaches, 

And books are beginning to bore, 

Comes a pause in the night's occupation, 
That is know as the children's hour. 

I hear in the hallway above me 
The patter of slippered feet; 

The strum of a ukalele, 

And voices soft and sweet. 

I put by my Psych with a flourish, 
With never a thought or a care, 

I care not for optic illusions; 

My one thought is but to be there. 

There's wonderful fudge in the making, 
And coffee and sandwiches, too, 

And a dish of peculiar concoction; 
It's something entirely new. 

We take our ambrosia and nectar, 
And again we play and we sing, 

But then in the midst of our revel 
We hear an unpleasant ring. 

Lo ! the Proctor appears in the doorway, 
And straightway a spirit of gloom 

Reigns now where before all was revel, 
And each maid retires to her room. 



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF 

We didn't have a Miss Rush? 

Mr. Crothers was in a hurry all" the time? 

Dr. Bacon got a grouch? 

Miss Wilkinson had no crushees? 

Dr. Burtt's bicycle was broken? 

Mr. Rabe forgot his boutonniere? 

Madame Mottet remembered our names? 

Dr. Lefavour lost his glasses ? 

Miss Diall became round-shouldered? 

Dr. Varrell fell "Out of the saddle"? 

Aliss Holbrook lost her chain? 

219 



LATEST PERILS OF PAULINE 



Presented by the POLYOMELITES FILM CO. 

Accidental Music by Miss Gladys Wiener 

DRAMATIS PERSONAE 

Richard — Hero, rich, brave and handsome 
Pauline — Heroine, poor but beautiful flower girl 



B. Brown 

H. Babcock 

M. Fisher 

N. Betts 

D. Black 

H. Leonard 

K. McManmon 

Passed by Ouarantina Board of Censorship 

Synopsis 
The beautiful flower girl stood on the street corner when Richard 
paused to buy one flower for his companion, Alicia. He looked into Paul- 



Pedro — Villain 

Alicia — Proud rich girl in love with Richard 

Mrs. Peubroke — Richard's scheming mother 

Pauline's Father 

Peubroke Butler 





220 



ine's big blue eyes, his manly heart swelled with a strange emotion, and as 
he passed on he turned his head to watch her. Hist ! what does he see ! 
The nefarious villain is stealing a kiss! 

"It shall not be!" quoth Richard, and soon that double-dyed scoundrel 
felt the strength of our Hero's good right arm. As the brave rescuer 
listened to the flower girl's pretty words of gratitude, and gazed into her 
upturned face, his heart beat fast, his brain reeled, and suddenly he knew 
that he loved her ! ! ! ! 

Each time that Richard saw Pauline his adoration grew. All Mrs. Pen- 
broke's most skillful attempts to ensnare him into proposing to Alicia were 
futile. 

At last the fateful day came when Mrs. Penbroke discovered the 
letter which Richard had lost in the heat of a bitter quarrel with the haughty 
Alicia. These are the words which met her puzzled eyes : 

"Darling, 

The minister and I will be at your home at three o'clock tomorrow. 
Be brave, sweetheart, and soon you will be mine. I can hardly wait. It's 
too wonderful to be true. 

Yours 'til eternity ends, 

Dick." 

Before the mother could grasp the import of this astounding letter, 
the butler entered with a still stranger missive. 

"Madam, 

It wood Be to your advantage to see Me. i can tell you sumthin that 
mite intrest you about your son. i am at your dore 

A frend" 



It was Pedro who had sent this and a foul plot was soon concocted 
against the beautiful object of Richard's love. 

On the day that was to have seen her union with the man she loved, 
Pauline was snatched from her quiet home by Pedro. Bound to a chair 
with an infernal machine steadily ticking off the seconds, the doomed girl 
was given her choice: To die, or marry without love. Her distress and 
terror might well have moved a heart of stone, but never that of Pedro. 
Death must be her portion, for never would her pure soul consent to a 
union with such a fiend. But, hark! a sound was heard. It was Richard, 
her hero, her prince of men sent by his mother who had confessed all. 

A frightful struggle followed, but at last, Pedro was left unconscious 
on the floor while Richard rushed off carrying the girl of his heart. The 

221 



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forgotten machine ticked on. We will draw a merciful veil over what 
followed but let us remember that "The wages of sin is death." 

Our hero carried his fair burden home to his repentant mother. There 
in the arms of her gallant lover Pauline opened her dewy eyes, and once 
more there were 

"Two minds with but a single thought, 
Two hearts that beat as one." 

Good Night! 

N.B. The playwright acknowledges her indebtedness to the Sargent 
girls. 




222 



QUOTATIONS FROM FAVORITE AUTHORS 

"O wad some power the giftie gie us 
To see ourselves as the faculty see us." 

"I hold it true whate'er befall 

I feel it when I sorrow most; 
'Tis better to have fun and flunk 

Than never to have fun at all." 

"It is a wise student that knows his own intelligence mark." 

"Tell me where is fancy bread 
That I may look and then drop dead?" 

"To flee or not to flee. That is the question; 
Whether 'tis wiser in the end to suffer the stings and arrows 

of grim poverty 
Or to take arms against this Fenway monster 
And by exclaiming scare him?" 

"When I consider how my nights are spent 
In Simmons' halls secure from city light, 
And that all pleasures gay, attractive, bright, 
Are me denied, my heart is rent." 

"Ring out, wild bells! I slumber on." 

LOST AND FOUND 

Note: The following department has been established for the con- 
venience of our faculty. Would you not be willing to advertise, to regain 
a treasured gift, a sum of money, etc.? 

Lost: Somewhere in 116 on the 5th hour Monday, seven whatnots. 
Kindly return to Dr. Burtt. 

Lost : One hour plan. Please return to Dr. Eldridge in his office 
( 124) as soon as possible. 

Lost: Mr. Rabe's place in "Bau and Tatigkeit des Menschlichen 
Korpers." Please return to Room 226 the 4th hour Wednesday or Friday. 

Found: In Room 222 a pocketbook containing some "figure sense." 
Owner can obtain same by qualifying in a rapid calculation test. Charles 
F. Rittenhouse. 

Lost: In Cookery Department, a perfect biscuit. Valued as keep- 
sake. Finder please communicate with Mary Jones, 19 19. 

Found: A new method of jogging along through the corridors. 
For further information apply to Thaddeus. Adv. 

Lost: Redeemable absence. Reward of $5,000 if returned unmu- 
tilated. 

223 



LA SIMMONS SANS MERCI 

what can ail thy maiden calm ! 
Thou standst there palely loitering ! 

Thy brow is wrinkled in despair, 
And no laugh rings. 

Oh what can ail thy maiden calm ! 

Why mirthless and so teary-eyed? 
Exams you know are not yet come, 

Dull cares aside ! 

1 chanced to stroll down by the Board, 

Full merrily with chatter gay; 
My spirits light with joyous song, 
Ne'er fairer day ! 

I glanced thereon with careless look, 

Unsuspecting mortal I, 
When suddenly I was transfixed ; 

Then might I die ! 

My name I saw emblazoned there 
In letters fiery red, it seemed, 

On card as blue as heaven's sky. 
O how it gleamed ! 

And my heart fell with awful thud, 
"See Dr. Eldridge," next I read. 

Dark clouds passed o'er my calm serene. 
All joy then fled. 

So this is why I linger here, 

And stand here palely loitering, 

My brow is wrinkled in despair, 
And no laugh rings. 





■ 


1 



224 



A FRESHMAN'S DAY 

In the gray dawn of the morning when my trusty, true, alarm clock 
Awakens me from sweet repose with ceaseless, silvery ring, 

Then my downy bed's so comfy — oh, for just another minute! 

And the dream I saw through Physics spoiled by that infernal thing! 

But oh, it's 

Jane be nimble, Jane be quick ! 

Classes begin at nine on the tick. 

A last pat and prink, some last hasty looks, 

Then skip off, Miss Jane, to your lessons and books. 

Up the stairs, ten minutes late, I climb with hasty tread, 

Trembling to think of the scathing words to fall on my young head. 

For though I've done just ergs of work, my brain's all in a whirl 

With contrary kings doing all sorts of things ! — I'm a poor, unhappy girl. 

Next to our daily gathering place we weary Freshmen wander, 
O'er dreadful Physics problems to sigh, and groan, and ponder; 
All bound together by a bond of common misery, 
We chatter, chatter as we go, in tones of agony. 
We're the trial of the J. C. Committee, 

And they glower at us and "shush!" 
But next hour we'll be failing, 
So we surely can't help wailing, 

And it's useless to ask us to hush. 

Yet though we're sure we're worked to death and plunged in misery, 
We're all in love with college life, its fun and jollity. 
And we're dreaming now of flowing robe and college cap on head, 
Our importance and our value when we're ladies, college bred. 



If you're waking, call me early, call me early, roommate dear; 
For tomorrow'll be the busiest day of all the senior year; 
Tomorrow awful mid-years start, they last the whole week through ; 
And I must surely pass Accounts and Business Methods, too. 
There's also Type and Shorthand that I must thoroughly ken ; 
But when the week is over I'll be happy, — not till then. 
My Big Ben has deserted me, he is no longer here, 
So if you're waking, call me early, call me early, won't you, dear? 



225 



THE FIRST HOCKEY GAME 

It was a free hour cheery, but I pondered tired and weary 

O'er a super-lengthy lesson that would fill one's heart with woe, 

When a glad and gay commotion put into my head the notion 

That I, too, should have a playtime, and for exercise should go 

To be introduced to hockey. To play hockey I should go. 
But then — I did not know. 

The wind was sharp and chilly, and I certainly felt silly 

Hopping up and down on tiptoe, to keep from getting cold. 

When to play fullback they bade me, I should do it, ay, and gladly, 
If I but knew what the thing meant, I should do as I was told. 

My knees began to shiver, when to play it I was told. 
But I must be brave and bold. 

Advice and regulations and a vast amount of patience, 

From all directions on my ignorance these friends-in-need did pour, 
And yet it was small wonder that I made the wildest blunder 

When they came with dash and clatter and then — Ow, my shins were 
sore ! 
And I murmured, peeved and humbled, "This rough game I'll play no 
more !" 

Sighed my banged limbs, "Never more." 




226 



MOTHER GOOSE A LA SIMMONS 

What is a Freshman made of, made of? 
What is a Freshman made of? 

F rivolity, a slight amount, changed at times to frenzied fright; 

R ashness, too, perhaps, reliability and right; 

E xtraordinary energy — just wait and see us show it ! 

S ense, we modestly admit; we cannot help but know it. 

H ilarity and hopefulness; we need it, goodness knows ! 

M irth and merriment; a memory that wandering goes; 

A lertness and assurance, yet alarmed anxiety; 

N o nonsense ( ?) but all "nice" things in the greatest quantity. 

Jumble these together, with brains and beauty, too, a-plenty, 

And lo ! you've a young woman of the class of 1920. 

Second-hand books, second-hand books ! 
Save a penny, save a penny ! Buy second-hand books. 
Get them on the fourth floor, and never mind their looks, 
But cheerfully dole out your wealth for second-hand books! 




227 



"A COMEDY OF ERRORS" 

A Tragi-Comic Tale of 191 7 

In Four Acts 

By 

Two Survivors 



Cast 



Elsie Smith 
Mary Cooke 
June Dewey 



Ethyl Alcohol 
Tames Nasium 
Mr. Oliver 



Ogres and Wisemen 

Place — House of Wonders. 
Time- — ;Not long ago. 

A Brief Synopsis of the Play 

ACT I. 

Elsie Smith, Mary Cooke, June Dewey, and Ethyl Alcohol enter the 
House of Wonders to begin exploring its mysterious depths and to learn 
its dark secrets. 

They visit certain Wisemen who send them to the Ogre's Den. 

The Ogre's Den. Here they are robbed of their money but obtain 
the "Books of Knowledge." 

A summons comes to visit again the Wisemen. Upon doing so they 
are warned of their unsatisfactory progress. 

The Happy Meeting with Mr. James Nasium, who gives them many 
good times. 

The Hours of Despair — Mary Cooke and Ethyl Alcohol almost 
fail to pass certain prescribed tests which were to determine whether they 
could continue their explorations. 

The long looked-for rest. The oracles assure them that their work 
has been satisfactory, they sadly bid Jim farewell, and leave the House 
of Wonders. 

ACT II. 

After three months of absence the four maidens return to the House 
of Wonders, but pursue their adventures separately. 

Elsie Smith begins to decipher the weird hooks and curves of the 
magic writing. 

Mary Cooke learns how to make fairy tidbits. 



228 



June Dewey is taught how to preserve and care for the Books of 
Knowledge. 

Ethyl Alcohol stews and brews mystic herbs in a witch's caldron. 

After they have pursued their courses in this manner for nearly a 
year they receive a seal which acts as a passport to allow them to continue 
their searching for another year. 

ACT III. 

The four maidens welcome the new explorers and promise to be their 
guardian angels should troubles o'ertake them. 

To ingratiate herself into the favor of the powers that be Mary Cooke 
serves daily delectable delicacies. 

Elsie Smith gets acquainted with the law as regards bona fide pur- 
chasers of solitaires and race horses. 

Urged on by the necessity of replenishing certain books of knowledge 
which careless mortals have handled without due reverence June Dewey 
spends many weary hours gluing and pasting. 

With more zeal than ever Ethyl Alcohol studies the elements in the 
hopes that some day she may become at least an assistant to Zeus and help 
him to control the lightning and thunder. 

In April the House of Wonders is invaded by the masculine friends 
of the four damsels. At this belated Winter Carnival much mirth and 
revelry prevail. 

Before leaving the House of Wonders for the third time the maidens 
are invited to linger around a few days to bid the older explorers farewell. 

ACT IV. 

The virgins enter the House of Wonders for the last year of their 
explorations. They adorn themselves with robes of funereal black to in- 
dicate their sadness at the prospects of having to leave the scene of so many 
pleasant adventures. 

June Dewey becomes so well acquainted with the prescribed books of 
knowledge that she is soon able to select new volumes for her own further 
enlightenment. 

About this time Elsie Smith is introduced to Mr. Oliver whom she 
finds a great bore. She also becomes conversant with the mechanism of 
various infernal machines, but receives no serious injury from any of them. 

Ethyl Alcohol spends many long nights writing books of magic and 
mystery, but unfortunately she never wins any fame in the way because 
none of them ever reach the eyes of mortals outside the walls of the House 
of Wonders. 



229 



It seems as though Mary Cooke has turned her attention to physical 
culture because she devotes her valuable time to the study of how to sub- 
sist on two thousand units of heat a day. 

Throughout the year the four damsels pass their leisure moments in 
contemplation of such weighty subjects as the odor of burnt pie crust, the 
blackness and whiteness in guinea pigs, the feeblemindedness of college men 
and women, and "what not." 

But even in the world of mystery everything has its end. Ere long 
the wise and dignified virgins take reluctant leave of the Wisemen who 
have assisted them in their quest, and who now present each one with a 
scroll which will prove her ability to all the world. Armed with these 
parchments, with slow and faltering steps the maidens leave the House of 
Wonders, bid farewell to each other, and depart in different directions to 
seek new adventures. Many were the mysterious but pleasant adventures 
which they shared with each other, and many were the tears shed as they 
went away a sad but wiser group than when they came to the House of 
Wonders four long years ago. 




230 



Campbell kid, all praise is due 
To you, our mascot ever true. 
You've helped us all our victories gain, 
You've been our sunshine after rain, 
And when sorrows pressed the while 
We found our comfort in your smile. 
You are so very wondrous wise 

1 ou've told us volumes with those eyes. 
And now before we say farewell, 

To everything we love so well, 
Where'er we go, where'er we be, 
Our song of praise will be for thee — 
O Campbell kiddie — Here's to you ! 




231 



A world calls longingly; its plea 

Sounds high above the noise of toil, — 
Above the voices mingling loud ; — 

O, dost thou hear ? A world calls thee ! 

Four years in college walls. And now 
Thou goest forth to find thy work; 
With youth and joyous hope and faith, 

And dreams of great deeds, goest thou. 

A world needs strength. It bids thee lift 
Unfalteringly thy share — and more — 
In fullest measure must thou give, 

Thou must not fail, nor stint the gift. 

Four years in college walls. Hast found 
That which gives understanding love 
To minister in quietness 

Where grief and pain and wrong abound? 

Give of thy womanhood, thy best, 
And giving, thou shalt find fulfilled 
Thine own heart's needs. And sweet content 

Shall be thine oft-abiding guest. 

A world calls longingly; its plea 
Sounds high above all calls beside. 
And thou wilt in thy woman's strength 

Go to the world that needeth thee. 




232 





°\1 (? 






Sept. 
18-19 

20 

21 



JUST A REMINDER 



-Seniors wear caps and gowns, 
we have greeted, and we shall 



Registration. 
Dean's Meeting- 
Classes begin. 
We are greeting 
friends. 

Student Government Party. 

First Vespers — Dean Arnold speaks at the halls. 
Lost, strayed or stolen, Senior shorthand speed. 
The burrs are given over to the custody of Thaddeus. 
Chapel — Seniors wobble down the aisle and are thrilled 
inwardly. 

Dormitory Government Party. 
A few remaining pictures take their places on the walls. 



2-1 
25 
26 
27 

29 
30 

Oct. 

3 "Life" comes anew to Simmons. 

4 Eleanore Keith moves amid very trying conditions — in a 
wheel-barrow. 

5 Seniors acquire Freshman protegees. 

6 Friday, and nothing to do until Monday. 

7 World's Series start. 

9 We go home on account of infantile paralysis. 
10 College closes to dorm girls for two weeks. For further 
information about the quarantine period see preceding 
pages of this book. 

16-23 Period of mourning in College. The day girls miss us 
coming over the dump. 

24 Once more we sign health certificates. 

26 The bulletin board assumes a blue look, redeemable ab- 
sences being the missing link. 

27 Remington medal day. 

28 Hallowe'en party. Sophomore-Senior Luncheon postponed. 

29 Ten bottles of ink used in the preparation of one dia- 
tctics chart. 

30 Dr. Varrell lectures to the Social and Civics Club on the 
political situation. 

31 Hominy for breakfast, etc., etc. 



Nov. 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



Founder's Day. Services in memory of John Simmons. 

Political rally. Roosevelt loses his orange peel teeth. 

Simmons elects Flughes. 

The Juniors wed the Freshmen. 

New Jersey Tea. 

Try-outs for Dramatics. "To be or not to be" causes 
uneasy minds. 

Mr. Savidis of Athens spoke to us on Roberts College 
in Constantinople. 



233 









PAYDAY 




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Fare well 

Inf-AD+il*. 



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irhc- 

torntp * 



9 Gloomy day for the Republicans — and the Juniors who 
take Com Law. 

10 The Democrats gloat and watch their funds grow. 

11 Nothing particular. One of those uneventful days. 

12 G. Hussey leads our singing at dinner. 
12 Student Government-College Grad Tea. 

15 Doctor Varrell speaks on Pan-Americanism at Current 
Events. 

16 Marion Doten, Mary Pollard and Sally Thompson leave 
for Mt. Holyoke Convention. 

17 Billy Sunday on Friday. 

18 Sophomore Luncheon — once more the faculty are imitated ! 

19 Return of the "Conventionals" who convince us that we 
sorely need a Student Building. 

22 Dormitory Government Meeting. Miss Stites spoke very 
interestingly. 

24 Dr. Eastman, a Sioux Indian, lectures on "The Last Stand 
of the Sioux." 

28 Senior candy pull. 

29 Thanksgiving vacation. We all welcome Betty Miller back. 



or / 



Ht/CrhES 








" Ul& 1 1 1 n a 
tor her • 




F 



4 



The. Q^ipf 




Dec. 

4 We return all too soon, and are warned not to complain 
of fatigue. 

5 Doctor Eldridge has a cold. 

6 Mrs. Sedgwick reads letters from the war zone. 

9 Dramatics. Our budding geniuses make their debut. 

11 We sing "between the soup" or "what not." 

14 Cecilia Concert. 

15 Christmas party. Miss Hale entertained us charmingly. 

17 Christmas vespers. 

18 Psych final. 

19 Intelligence tests. 

20 We make a farewell visit to the Allied Bazaar. 

21 Christmas vacation. 

Jan. 

4 College reopens and East House becomes the active center 
of everything. 

7 Mary Antin and Winston Churchill visit Boston, and we 
take advantage of this unusual opportunity. 

11 Seniors parade through the dorms and boom Brown Glee 
Club Concert to the tune of "Brighten the Corner." 

11 Interesting discourse on "Buttons" at Chapel. 

12 Brown Glee Club Concert. 

15 A few unfortunates rise at 5.30 to go to the Union. 

17 FLUNK CARDS!!! 

18 We clean house with a vengeance. 

19 The Corporation come to tea. 

22 We learn about spiritualism and hypnotism in Psych. 

24 "' 'T was the day before mid-years, and all through the 
house," etc. 

234 



*32 




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25 "Hence vain deluding 

26 Exam. 

27 Exam. 

28 Study. 

29 Exam. 

30 Study. 

31 Exam. 



joys! 



Mid-years becin. 



,.»»• ' (» 



Feb. 

1 
2 

3 

4 



/ 
8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

26 
28 



Study. 
Exam. 
Exam. 

End of an imperfect week. We resume normal habits 
of living. 

Beginning of the term, thunder storm, and rumors of war — 
three ominous signs. 
Senior sleighride to Medford. 

Psych intelligence marks revealed. Simmons lacks in- 
genuity. 

Glee Club tickets sold, and great excitement manifested. 
Ohio Club Dinner. 
Junior-Alumnae Party. 

Persimmons appears and begs for supporters. 
South Hall has two fire drills. 
The ice on the dump begins to t-h-a-w ! 
Glee Club Dance. The Ukalele Club appears on the public 
stage for the first time. 
Church and vespers, vespers and church. 
Sugar mounts in price ; we decide to like salt. 
The faculty make merry at their- annual dinner. 
Dr. Crocker speaks at the Red Cross Meeting at College. 
Holiday and the Washington Birthday party. Great in- 
genuity is displayed in the masculine costumes. 
Classes are diminished in size. Miss Walker writes un- 
redeemables all day. 

The Red Cross Organization enrolls a goodly number of 
Simmonsites. 

The beginning of another week. Oh ! 

Dean Hodges at Chapel. Miss Murray of the Harvard 
Unit speaks at Current Events meeting in North Hall. 
Alas ! this isn't leap year. Sorry to have aroused false 
hopes. 






brA \n roo<^ 




Mar. 

1 March enters like a lamb. Beware the Ides ! 

4 College Grad-Special Tea in South Hall. 

5 This which you now read passed forever from the hands 
of the editor. Amen. 



o 



235 



KfUvumrb 

Oh, Simmons dear, where'er we be 

When college days have long since past, 

We'll pledge our loyalty to thee. 
'Twill live unto the last. 

Thy memory shall never fade 

We'll cherish it through space and time; 
'Twill be our strength, 'twill courage give 

To mount the ascents we would climb. 

Seventeen bids farewell to thee 

In this her final fleeting hour; 
She goes with earnest prayer to be 

Full worthy of thy precious dower. 




CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS 



(Elaamfwo Hist of KhnntiBt vb 



BANK 

State Street Trust Co. 



PAGE 

. xx 



BATHROOM FIXTURES 
Geo. T. Johnson 



BOOKS 

A. D. Maclachlan 

Old Corner Bookstore, Inc 

Women's Educational and Indus- 
trial Union 



VII 

xviii 



CAPS AND GOWNS 
Cox Sons & Vining. 



CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS 
A. Hathaway Co 



CHINA AND GLASSES 

Jones. McDuffee & Stratton. 

COAL 

Staples Coal Co. of Boston.. 

CONFECTIONERY 

Farquharson Candy Co 

Otto Gunther's Sons 



xx 
viii 



DEPARTMENT STORES 

Jordan Marsh Co 

C. F. Hovey Co.. 



EXPRESS 

Armstrong Transfer Co. 

FIREPLACE FITTINGS 
B. F. Macy 



FLORIST 

Houghton-Gorney Co. . 

FOOTWEAR 

T. E. Moseley 

Sample Shoe Shop Co. 
Thayer McNeil Co 

FURS 

C. F. Hovey Co ....... . 

Otto J. Piehler. Inc 



VII 

xiii 



ICE 



Independent Ice Co. 



INSURANCE 

Cyrus Brewer Co 

Dewick & Flanders 

Employers' Liability Assurance.. 

Field & Cowles 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co. 
Watson & Rivinius 



JELLO 

Genesee Pure Food Co. 



JEWELER page 

Dieges & Oust vii 

KITCHENWARE 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co.. xii 

B. F. Macy xv 

LAMPS 

McKenney, Waterbury Co viii 



MASON 

Arthur D. Jones vi 

MILK 

D. Whiting & Sons xvi 



MILLINERY 

C. F. Hovey vii 

OPTICAL GOODS 

Robey-French Co xx 

ORIENTAL SHOP 

Walter M. Hatch xx 

PAINTING AND DECORATING 

Bemis & Jewett vii 

F. M. Rogers & Co xix 

PHOTOGRAPH SUPPLIES 

Robey-French Co xx 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Champlain Studios xiv 



PRINTER 

Caustic-Claflin Co xi 

Dunbar-Kerr Co xiii 

J. C. Miller, Jr viii 

D. B. Updike xiii 

PROVISIONS 

Batchelder & Snyder xvii 

Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co xviii 

S. S. Pierce xii 

Smith Brothers xv 

Twitchell-Champlin Co xv 

Weston-Thurston Co xvi 

RUGS AND DRAPERIES 

Chandler & Co xviii 

Walter M. Hatch xx 

SEWING MACHINES 

C. C. Bowles xix 

SILKS AND DRESS GOODS 

Walter M. Hatch xx 

Beattie & McGuire vi 



II 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



STATIONERY page 

Ward's xiii 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

A. D. Maclaelilan vii 

TEA AND LUNCH ROOM 

Women's Educational and Indus- 
trial Union xviii 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Fisk Teachers' Agency xiii 



WEARING APPAREL (Dresses, Suits, 

Waists) page 

Chandler & Co xviii 

Walter M. Hatch xx 

C. F. Hovey & Co vii 

Henry S. Lombard xv 

Jordan Marsh Co v 

Meyer Jonasson & Co ix 

Noyes Bros xvii 

A. Shuman & Co xiii 

E. T. Slattery Co xi 

William Read & Sons, Inc xii 



Jnfox to AfcurrttBprs 

Inasmuch as the generous response of our advertisers has largely made 
possible the publication of the Microcosm, the least we can do is to patronize 
the firms herein represented. 



Armstrong Transfer Express Co 

Batchelder & Snyder Co 

Beattie & McGuire 

Bemis & Jewett 

C. C. Bowles & Co 

Cyrus Brewer & Co 

Caustic-Claflin Co 

Champlain Studios 

Chandler & Co 

Cobb. Bates & Yerxa Co 

Cox Sons & Vining 

Dieges & Clust 

Dewick & Flanders 

Dunbar-Kerr Co 

Employers' Liabilty Assurance Cor 

poration 

Farquharson Candy Co 

Field & Cowles 

Fisk Teachers' Agency 

Genesee Food Co 

Otto Gunther's Sons 

Walter M. Hatch 

Hatchet Brand Canned Goods 

A. Hathaway Co 

Houghton-Gorney Co 

C. F. Hovey Co 

Independent Ice Co 

Geo. T. Johnson Co 

Arthur D. Jones 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co 

Jordan Marsh Co 



PAGE 

viii 
xvii 



VI 

vii 
xix 



x 

xi 

xiv 

xviii 

xviii 

xv 

vii 

x 

xiii 

x 
xx 



x 

xiii 
xxi 
viii 

XX 

XV 

vi 

iv 

vii 

ix 

xix 

vi 

xii 

v 



Henry S. Lombard 

A. D. Maclachlan 

B. F. Macy 

McKenney & Waterbury Co 

Merrymount Press 

Meyer Jonasson & Co 

J. C. Miller, Jr 

T. E. Moseley Co 

Noyes Bros 

Old Corner Book Store 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co 

Otto J. Piehler, Inc 

S. S. Pierce Co 

William Read & Sons, Inc 

Robey-French Co 

F. M. Rogers & Co 

Sample Shoe Shop Co 

A. Shuman & Co 

E. T. Slattery Co 

Smith Brothers '. 

Staples Coal Co 

State Street Trust Co 

Thayer McNeil Co 

Twitchell-Champlin Co 

D. B. Updike 

Ward's 

Watson & Rivinius 

Weston-Thurston Co 

D. Whiting & Sons 

Women's Educational and Industrial 

Union 



PAGE 

xv 

vii 

xv 

viii 

xiii 

ix 

viii 

xii 

xvii 

xviii 



x 
xiii 

xii 
xii 

XX 

xix 
ix 

xiii 
xi 

XV 

ix 
xx 

viii 
xv 
xiii 
xiii 
x 
xvi 
xvi 



III 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




ASK FOR SIMMONS DISCOUNT 



IV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



" Simmons College, 
Here's to You!" 



-H~ 



1] We want to add to the pleasures of your college days 
by making you feel that this is your "home" store while 
you are here at Simmons. 

^| It is more than likely that Mother shopped here when 
she was your age, and it is even quite possible that it was 
at Jordan Marsh Company that Grandmother bought that 
quaint old-fashioned silk you have so long admired. 
And each generation finds us better equipped to live up 
to this long established reputation. 

^| Our Main Store is prepared to meet your wardrobe demands 
for every occasion from " sporting to dress-up," including the all- 
important accessories. 

\ The New Building will provide you with your favorite books, 
the latest Jewelry and high grade Toilet Articles, as well as the 
newest Furnishings for the dormitory beautiful. 

-H- 

Jordan Marsh Company 

v 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Beattie & McGuire 

( Famous for Silks and Dress Goods ) 

IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 

Dress Goods, Suitings, 0| T X ~WT C^J Wash Dress Fabrics, 
Cloakings »J_1 \\ j J^ |^ Georgette Crepes 

Chiffon Cloths, Spool Silk, etc. 



NOTE. — Students of Simmons College will be allowed by us a Special Discount 
of H' on all merchandise except during out Semi-Annual Clearance Sales 



29 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 

Over Emerson's — TAKE ELEVATOR — Telephone j ^ g0 j Beach 











ARTHUR D. JONES 

Mason and 
Contractor 

Prompt attention given to 

Jobbing of all kinds. Alterations 

to Buildings and Boiler Work 

a Specialty 


I 




ESTABLISHED 1841 

A. Hathaway Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Carpenters and Builders 


82 CHARLES STREET 
BOSTON 


76 KINGSTON STREET 
BOSTON 


Telephone, Haymarkel I27'» 


TELEPHONES : 

2676 Beach, and Home. 11654 Bellevue 









VI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




FURS 

01. 31 ijrnipg (Eompatuj 

Summer, Chauncy and Avon Sts. 
BOSTON, MASS. 



CARDS 

CHRISTMAS— NEW YEAR— VALENTINE 
HALLOWE'EN-THANKSGIVING 

BIRTHDAY— ENGAGEMENT 
WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 

PLACE CARDS- DANCE ORDERS 
TALLIES— PARTY FAVORS 

ENGRAVING AND DIE 
STAMPING 

A. D. MACLACHLAN 

Stationer 
502 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 



BEMIS 8c JEWETT 

Painting 

In all its Branches 

<£^WALL PAPERS.*^ 

Upholstery Work 

Stuffs for Coverings 
Draperies 

Holiday Novelties 

Favors for Luncheons, Dinners, 
Parties and Pop Concerts 

OFFICES AND SALESROOMS 
Newton Centre, Mass. Needham, Mass. 



DIEGES 8c CLUST 

" If we made it, it's right " 

Original designers and Makers of the 

OFFICIAL SCHOOL PIN 

Class Pins 

Fraternity Pins 

Class Rings 
Medals and Cups 

149 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



VII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




McKenney & Waterbury Co. 

Are showing more than 100 styles in 

Desk Lamps E1 T' C 

The lamp illustrated may be hung on wall or side of 
bed. Finished in burnished brass, shade white enam- 
eled inside. 6- ft silk cord, full chain, socket and plug 

CALL OR SEND FOR CATALOGS 

181 Franklin Street c ££? n e e s r s %■ 
BOSTON, MASS. 





Plastic Footwear 



RFC U. S. PATENT OFFICE 1 91 2 



Is especially effective when relief is needed from the strain and 
ache resulting from walking or standing in illfitting shoes 

STYLES 

BOOTS — SHOES — PUMPS 

THAYER McNEIL COMPANY 

47 TEMPLE PLACE - - - 15 WEST STREET 



Otto Gunther's Sons 
Wholesale Confectioners 

ROSLINDALE, MASS. 



J. G. MILLER, JR. 

Printer 

5 AND 7 LAURIAT PLACE 

MEDFORD, MASS 

Telephone Medford 780 



Armstrong Transfer PROMPT and RELIABLE SERVICE 

Baggage checked through to destination if you procure your 

E railroad tickets in advance. :: Taxicab stands at North, South 

XT)lcSS and Back Bay Stations. :: Telephone your orders to — 

Beach 5380. or Brookline 3020 



Company M in ° ffi « 

1 J 271 Albany 



St.. Boston 



Brookline Office, 

1296 Beacon St., Brookline 



VIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Meyer Jonasson 
& Co. 

Tremont and Boylston Sts. 

The "UNUSUAL" 

IN 

ATTIRE FOR WOMEN 
AND MISSES 


1 he Sample Shoe Shop Co. 


High Grade Shoes — Low Prices 

We desire to announce that after 
August 1, 1917, we will be located 
on the fourth floor of the Blake 
Building, 59 Temple Place, where 
we will be even better equipped to 
serve our patrons than we now are 


496 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

Corner Bedford 
Over Riker-Jaynes Take Elevator 


Compliments of the 

Independent Ice Co. 

171 Second Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 


Compliments of 

Staples Coal Company 
of Boston 

40 Central Street, Boston 



IX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Dewick & Flanders 
INSURANCE 

100 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



Watson & Rivinius 
INSURANCE 

95 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
A LEADING AMERICAN CORPORATION 

ORGANIZED IN 1825 (When John Quincy Adams was President of the United States) 
NEW ENGLAND DEPARTMENT (Six States), 137 Milk Street, Cor. Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 

EDWARD C. BRUSH, Manager FRANK H. BATTILANA, Associate Manager 

CYRUS BREWER & CO. 

INSURANCE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



44 KILBY STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

The Employers' Liability Assurance Corporation 

( Limited ) 

OF LONDON 
The Original and Leading Liability Insurance Company in the World 

Workmen's Compensation, Liability, Accident, 

Disability, Fidelity, Surety, Burglary, Plate Glass 

and Steam Boiler Insurance 

PROVIDING ABSOLUTE PROTECTION AND UNEQUALLED SERVICE 
SAMUEL APPLETON, United States Mgr. 132 Water Street, BOSTON 



FIELD & COWLES 
INSURANCE 

85 Water Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



X 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



MODES CHIQUES POUR LES JEUNES 
COLLEGIENNES 

MODES qui possedent les rares qualites d 'individualite, 
d'audace, de tournure irreprochable, de charme fem- 
inin et de couleurs brillautes. 

Habits de toutes sortes pour la classe, pour le campus, 
pour les soirees, pour la salle de clause, pour le theatre, et 
pour tous les emplois scholastiques, ainsi que sociaux, de la 
vie colleg'ienne. 

Nous avons uu departemeiit special qui se charge des 
commandes envoyees par le poste. Nous nous donnons le 
plaisir de mettre a vos dispositions toutes les facilites de ce 
departemeiit. La Maison Slattery. 

IE. 5L j^laitrnj (Unmpany 

OPPOSITE BOSTON COMMON 

154-155-156-158 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Caustic - Claflin Company 

Printers of The Microcosm 

PUBLISHERS 

HARVARD, RADCLIFFE, SIMMONS 
AND WHEELOCK PUBLICATIONS 



TEXT BOOKS, LODGE AND HARVARD SQUARE 

SOCIETY REPORTS CAMBRIDGE 



XI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



CHINA and GLASS 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 




DINNERWARE 

One hundred and fifty Shapes and Decora- 
tions to choose from, in all grades up to the 
costly decorated dinner services. 

GLASSWARE OF ALL GRADES 

KITCHEN and COOKING WARE 

is a specialty with us 

INSPECTION INVITED 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

Crockery, -China and Glass Merchants 

{ten floors) 
33 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON 



T.E. 



lI*±zX ttq&ffi Ki^ 



•Q> 



Spring and Summer 

STYLES 




New and exclusive designs in PUMPS 
and OXFORDS 

OUTING SHOES in great variety 

160 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



Groceries 

Of the Highest Grade 

Perfumery and 
Toilet Articles 

The largest and most complete line 
in New England 

CONFECTIONERY 

Selected for its Superior Quality from the best 
specialty manufacturers in each line 

PRICE-LIST SENT ON APPLICATION 

S. S. Pierce Co. 

BOSTON and BROOKLINE 



Sport Clothes 




CATALOG MAILtD ON REQUEST 

WILLIAM READ &c SONS, Inc. 
364 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

OPPOSITE BROMFIELD 



XII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




The DiniHerr Co.fiRl Printers — maiden 



We Print the " Persimmons " Magazine 



THE • SERVICE - STORE. 



Tailored Apparel 

for 

Young Women 



Man- tailored from 
Men's Fabrics 



=^-4^2?%. 




D. B. UPDIKE 

Cf)e s^errpmount press 

232 SUMMER ST. 
BOSTON 

PRINTER OF THE SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BULLETIN, & THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 

&fc. fife. &fc. 

Officers and Students of Simmons College 

are invited to visit the Press, opposite the 

South Station, Boston 



(Mr® jJ«{PUEffly^ 



sseTjovtsfon S-(re.&f 
gos-rop 




57-61 FRANKLIN ST. 

Fine Stationery 
High Grade Engraving 
stationers Printing 

Commencement and Class Day Invitations 

Wedding Stationery Reception and Visiting Cards 

Monogram and Address Dies 

Menus Programs and Dance Orders 

Stationery Supplies, Fountain Pens, Leather 

Specialties and Brass Goods 



The Fisk Teachers' Agency 

2A PARK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

New York, 156 Fifth Avenue 
Birmingham, Ala., 809 Title Bldg. 
Chicago, 28 East Jackson Boulevard 
Denver, 317 Masonic Temple 
Portland, Ore., 514 Journal Building 
Berkeley, Cal., 2161 Shattuck Avenue 
Los Angeles, 533 Citizens Nat. Bank Bldg. 

SEND TO ANY ADDRESS ABOVE FOR 
AGENCY MANUAL AND REGIS- 
TRATION FORMS, FREE 



XIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



161 TREMONT STREET 164 TREMONT STREET 

Telephone Beach 858 Telephone Beach 2687 




9 



'bostoni 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



CLASS 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

ARTISTIC 
PORTRAITURE 



PICTURE FRAMES FOR SALE IN OUR STUDIOS 



XIV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



COX SONS & VINING 

72 Madison Avenue, New York 

MAKERS OF CAPS 
.-. AND GOWNS .-. 

SIMMONS 1917 CONTRACT 




Correct Hoods for AH Degrees 



Choir Vestments 



LOMBARD MIDDIES 
and SPECIALTIES 
for the COLLEGE GIRL 

Blouses, Skirts, Coats, Dresses, 
Sweaters, etc. 

Send for Illustrated Booklet 

HENRY S. LOMBARD 

22 to 26 Merchants Row, Boston, Mass. 



WHEN LOOKING FOR QUALITY 

You will never be disappointed in 

HATCHET BRAND 

CANNED GOODS, DRIED FRUITS 
TEAS AND COFFEES 

Dealers and Institutes Supplied in 
Case or Car Lots 

The Twitchell-Champlin Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Albert P. Smith 



Telephone Richmond 1647 



SMITH BROTHERS 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
and Basement No. 3 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Creamery 



Telephones 3609 and 3879 Back Bay 

B. F. MACY 

Formerly of F. A. WALKER dc CO. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS 

and 

FIREPLACE FITTINGS 

410 Boylston St. (near Berkeley St.) 
BOSTON, MASS. 



XV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



#■ 



<sM* 



\SL 



(0 






WHITING'S 

Grade A Milk 

Clean — Because tested in our 
country laboratory. 

Safe — Because pasteurized sci- 
entifically. 

Reliable — Because supervised 
by our consulting expert. 



Pel C Quit D. WHITING & SONS 



^^/^ 





The World is Learning Economy! 

It is always economy to buy a GOOD article 

WE SELL ONLY 

Good Meats, Poultry, Butter, Eggs and Can Goods 

AND AT FAIR PRICES 

WESTON-THURSTON COMPANY 

Stalls 20-22-24 New Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON, MASS. 

TWO TELEPHONES 



XVI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




ZJ 



/$rs& 



Inc. 



127 Tremont Street 


Ladies' and Misses' 

SPRING 
SUITS 

Tyrol Wool in the new 
high light colors and in our 
original models is not on 
sale in any other store 



Also SPRING HATS 
that are unusual 



E] 




y#^ 



= ' 



' b Inc. 

127 Tremont Street 




BATCHELDER & SNYDER CO. 

PACKERS AND POULTRY DRESSERS 
WHOLESALE ONLY 

Beef. Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages 
Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Olive Oils 

Blackstone, North and North Centre Streets 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Native Poultry Dressing Plant 
49 North Centre St.. Boston 

Curing Plants, Boston and Chicago 



Sausage Factory and Smoke Houses 
Blackstone and North Sts. 



XVII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



SUITS— COATS GOWNS 

By specializing in garments of style and quality at moderate prices, 
Chandler & Co. offer splendid values in apparel for young ladies 
and misses. Rugs, draperies, curtains and linens are of the same 
high quality, and at equally low prices. 



QUjatt&Ur $c do 



Srrntnnt S'trrrt 
iBnatnn 



Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co, 

are thoroughly equipped to supply 
Colleges, Schools, Institutions and all 
large users of the best quality of 
groceries from their wholesale store at 



222 SUMMER STREET 

( OPPOSITE SOUTH STATION ) 



The Old Corner Book 
Store, Inc. 

Standard and New Books, Medical and 
Scientific Books, Prayer Books and Hymnals 

Subscriptions received for all English and 
American Periodicals 

27 and 29 BROMFIELD STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone : 7069 or 7070 Main 



The Bookshop for Boys and Girls 

Selected Books for Children 
of All Ages, at All Prices 

Pictures for Babies and 
"Young People from 7 to 70" 

Orders taken fur any book or magazine 

WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL UNION 

264 Bovlston Street. Boston 



XVIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



The NEW HOME 



For Quality, Simplicity 
and Durability 



Its Patent Double 

Feed is the only one 

that will sew thick or 

thin goods with equal 

precision. 

Hand Finished 
Throughout 

Ball Bearing 

Darning done with- 
out the aid of an 
Attachment 

Simple in Construc- 
tion, Silent and Easy 
Running 

Guarantee Never 
Runs Out 

Sold for Cash or 
Easy Payments 

No Interest 

Free Instruction at 
Your Home 




Adopted by Boston, Milton, 
Newton, Qitincy, Welleslty 
and other leading New Eng- 
land cities and towns for 
school use 



lVotP Beware of similarity 
of names. There is 
but one NEW HOME. 
Not made or sold under any 
other name. THE NEW 
HOME FACTORY, lo- 
cated at Orange, Mass, has 
the distinction of being the 
largest factory in the world 
engaged in the manufacture 
of Strictly High Grade Fam- 
ily Sewing Machines. 

You don't buy a sewing 
machine often. Get the 
New Home at the start 
and avoid trouble and dis- 
appointments ever after. 



Your old machine taken in 

exchange as Part Payment ' 

New Sewing Machines 

Ren led 

All Makes Repaired 

Parts, Needles and Oil for 

All Machines 



New Home — Vibrator — Long Shuttle 

We can supply New Home in Rotary, Round Bobbin; also Chain Stitch, single thread 



C. C. Bowles & Co. 



Opposite Jordan Marsh 
Furniture Annex 



Sole Boston Agts. 

37 BEDFORD STREET tel. 1352 beach 




BOSTON OVAL 

TOILET PAPER 

We have prepared a Home Combina- 
tion consisting of one handsomely nick- 
elled BOSTON OVAL Fixture (value 
75c.) and three rolls BOSTON OVAL 
Paper (value 30c). 

Combination Retails for 25c. 

Ask your Dealer for 

THE BOSTON OVAL HOME COMBINATION 

The Geo. T. Johnson Co. 
BOSTON, MASS. 



F. M. Rogers & Co. 
Painters and Decorators 

27 to 31 Province Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Members of Master Builders' Association 



XIX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 





State Street Trust Company 

MAIN OFFICE 

33 State Street 

COPLEY SQUARE BRANCH MASSACHUSETTS AVE. BRANCH 

579 Boylston Street Cor. Mass. Ave. and Boylston St. 

Safe Deposit Vaults at all three offices 
Interest allowed on accounts of $300 and over 






We have a Mission 

A very distinct Mission 

It is to waist and dress you prop- 
erly ( and of course all Simmons 
girls are proper), in good taste, 
and economically 

We practice in store economics 
that which you are learning in 
home economics, that is, to pro- 
duce and give the most and the 
hest in value and quality for the 
money. 

We would like to show you our 
waists and dresses and have you 
tell us how far we seem to be suc- 
ceeding in our dress economics. 

We are never undersold on goods 
of equal value. 

WALTER M. HATCH & CO. 
148 Tremont, at West St. 


Farquharson Candy Co. 

1366 Beacon Street. HROOKLINE. Coolidge Comer 






Our candies are made by and under the supervision 
of Mr. Wm. J. Farquharson, 12 years with Page 
&c Shaw, and 14 years with Bailey's. 26 years a 
candy maker in West Street. 

No Better Candy Made 

Price, 40 cents the pound 
SODAS AND COLLEGE ICES 






Mail and Telephone Orders given prompt attention 






No. 2-C Autographic Kodak Jr. 

PRICE. $12.00 

The camera that made a stir in the photographic 
world, not only because of the new-size picture 
it makes (2 "s by4~s inches), but also because such 
generous picture proportions have been obtained 
in a camera so easily pocketed. Have you seen 
it? We have them in stock. 

For your developing and printing work let us suggest 
your trying out our finely-equipped department. We 
know we can please you. 

ROBEY-FRENCH CO. 

EuBlmnn Kodak Compnn) 

38 Bromfield St., Boston, Mass. 





XX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 





*? 



"Shivering Jimmy" 



"The Mills College girls like Jell-O. With fruit inside and whipped 
cream outside, it is one of their favorite dishes and is affectionately known 
as 'Shivering Jimmy.' " ' 

Mills College, near San Francisco, is the only woman's college on the 
Pacific coast, and the student body is drawn from a field of great extent. It 
was a Mills College girl who told us about "Shivering Jimmy." 

As a change from fudge and other common things, nobody can be 
more appreciative of 




than the girls who must provide their own dainties and do 
it without devoting much time and effort to it. 

There are seven pure fruit flavors of Jell-O: Straw- 
berry, Raspberry, Lemon, Orange, Chercy, Peach, Chocolate. 
Each 10 cents at any grocer's. 

Little folders in Jell-O packages contain all the instruc- 
tions anyone needs in making the "made-in-a-minute" 
Jell-O dainties. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY, Le Roy, N. Y.